SoulBoogieAlex

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About SoulBoogieAlex

  • Rank
    Member
  • Birthday 11/01/1974

Profile Information

  • Location
    Rotterdam
  • Gender
    Male
  • Springsteen fan since?
    1999
  • Does Mary's dress wave or sway?
    Sway

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  • Website URL
    http://bosstracks.blogspot.com/
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    0

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  1. I'm reading a good book about Bowie and came across this section about him seeing Bruce at Max's. At the time Bruce was a struggling artist who had about a much of an audience as Iggy an Lou. I can't help but fantasize about a Bowie produced Springsteen album all of a sudden.
  2. you are a weird dude! But so are most of us here, so I guess you're in good company
  3. Glen Hansard used it to close his show with yesterday. Though it was a fun performance it also made clear to me how good those D&D performances were and how difficult this song is to do really well.
  4. The world would be a gray place without music to move us. I don't think it has to move you into action to matter, just offer a different perspective from time to time. You can't tell me music never moved you to rethink or look back on events that shaped your life. One of the things powerful to me is how music opened windows to worlds alien to me. The music of Stevie Wonder or Hip Hop in general for example. Or made me reflect on my life and my relationships. Tunnel of Love for example. There's music I mainly enjoy for the craft, like Davis Bowie's. But there definitely music that mattered more to me than that. It didn't move me to be on the barricades but it did matter more on a personal level than just fun or enjoyment. With all the engament you show here, surely music has made a difference for you on a personal level?
  5. With a nice essay on our object of obsession The Top 25 Songs That Matter Right Now https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2019/03/07/magazine/top-songs.html
  6. I would love for them to upload the videos they did for AOL at the time and the st Luke's performances. I loved those as well.
  7. I loved that aspect of the tour, you just didn’t know what he was going to pull. I like that there’s Rumble and a bullit mic Born in the USA on this release. I must admit that both Songs for the Orphans and Zero never did much for me. But I love that they were a possibility during that tour. The number of rarities on this one is insane.
  8. I'm not sure we've got the answers but we're bound to have a few members who wish they could have been that girl for an couple of days.
  9. You don't want to hear my rhapsodizing in the shower but I do hope another round comes to pass. I much enjoyed the last one.
  10. @Outside Looking Inone man’s fascinating curiosity is another’s masterpiece. I’m hard pressed to decide which album I like better, Born to Run or Nebraska. I’d hardly call the four albums that came after Darkness a nosedive in quality. In some respects I feel his lyrics became better as those years progressed even though the music was condensed to the absolute necessities on some of those albums. The once so maligned eighties sound has ironically been largely redeemed in the past decade and a half, though still not my favorite sound, I’ve only found more appreciation for those albums. I never thought the differences between Born to Run and Darkness were all that revolutionary. One of the attractions to Bruce’s discography is how he slowly evolved and allowed his audience to grow up with him. Certainly up until Born in the USA his albums were his take on Rock and Soul history, the accents on each album varied. Darkness was more Creedence and less Phil Spector, but the basic ingredients were still the same.
  11. For some reason I've got Tunnel of Love stuck in my head
  12. Could be worse, Queen fans already have to live with Adam Lambert
  13. By which time Adam Levine has probably taken Springsteen’s place and Charlie is the only surviving “original” member. The band will be a big success in the oldies circuit and playing homes for the elderly where the audience can still remember ‘78 but whose minds are foggy enough not to realize they’re no longer there.