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lazysean

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  1. That's one of my favorite parts of that release! Not that I listen to it every time - it's on its own track and can be easily skipped - but for a show so widely bootlegged in reasonably high quality, here was finally something new. After 40 years, here was a little tidbit that only those who were there had ever heard before. The energy from the crowd, to keep clapping and chanting a full 10 minutes after they leave the stage is powerful stuff. To hear the announcer admonishing the crowd a second time, insisting that the show is over and there's no way Bruce is coming back just seconds befo
  2. Absolutely. It's not that hard of a song, he gives them the key, sings out the basic horn part beforehand, and uses a LOT of hand signals during the song to keep everyone together. The same style of horns soloing and then playing over each other all at once is also exactly how they play the Seeger songs, Johnny 99, etc, so the band is used to it. I can see them pulling this off with no rehearsal at all, or as others have suggested seeing the sign a few days or even weeks beforehand and saying "that would be fun to do if we see it again". But actually planting signs and faking the whol
  3. Certainly there may be artistic reasons they only want to present these as complete shows, but my guess is it's largely a financial decision. How many people grumble a little about having to buy the full show but do it anyway? By offering individual tracks they may pick up a few extra customers, but how many full-show sales would they lose? The more popular individual tracks become, the more they cannibalize the larger sales. It may just not be worth it.
  4. War is a definite, because that solo simply doesn't exist in the original live show.
  5. Overdubbed in the studio is my guess. The closest match I found is the Bridge Benefit '86 which suggests to me that that's the general time period it's from. I would assume Bruce was pretty heavily involved in the Live release. Basically imagine the footage of him during Darkness, endlessly yelling "stick!" at Jimmy Iovine, but with live songs instead. If there's a bum note or flubbed solo from one of the other instruments, it's probably easier to copy it from the next night or whatever. If it's a problem with a line of Bruce's vocals, it's easier for him to just walk into the next ro
  6. As for the Passaic releases, it all just comes down to personal preference. For me, I think Steve was mixed absurdly high in the original broadcast. It was interesting to hear him so clearly, but ultimately I found it distracting. I prefer the new mix where he's pushed more to the background. If I'd never heard the broadcast I'd have no idea I was missing anything, this just sounds "right". Most of all I love that clearly careful attention was paid about when to mix him higher. Speaking of Badlands - compare at 4:04, on the new mix Steve is right there where he belongs, but when Bruce
  7. I don't see how someone can be so simultaneously picky about the nuances of Steve's rhythm guitar in the mix, and think Toby was doing a good job? Whether it was his directive or otherwise, all of his releases in this series were mixed to sound more "live", ie reverberant messes. Since you've used Badlands as an example - go back now and listen to either one of the Passaic releases back to back with Badlands from August 5 1984. Passaic sounds like you're on stage with the band, 84 sounds like you're at least halfway back in the arena. Clarence's solo sounds like it was recorded by cra
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