Skin2Skin

Members
  • Content Count

    23,907
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    74

About Skin2Skin

  • Rank
    Member
  • Birthday December 18

Profile Information

  • Location
    Chapel Hill, NC
  • Gender
    Female
  • Springsteen fan since?
    1973
  • Does Mary's dress wave or sway?
    waves
  • Sex?
    Female

Contact Methods

  • Website URL
    http://www.tarotpassages.com
  • ICQ
    0

Recent Profile Visitors

35,855 profile views
  1. Many times, but not since the album Spike. My favorite tour was Punch the Clock, but I also loved the song spinning wheel.
  2. Well, Western Stars is very influenced by Blazing Saddles. So I take your point.
  3. Seeing them next month. For some reason, I gave this album short shrift when it came out. It's excellent. And they have another one released this year. So that'll be next up.
  4. She is truly wonderful live. If you get a chance to see her, do it.
  5. This is really what I came to post: https://www.app.com/story/entertainment/music/2019/10/21/bruce-springsteen-western-stars-mental-health-therapy-john-wayne-western-stars-transcript/3989703002/?fbclid=IwAR0tvPuab57iEnGHv6QxHR6ozOkgpWQjca2OYKQHR_Jt26mmPx7OqxX_WsA
  6. I do get sucked in to some stupid arguments. It's a weakness. But I learn things just the same. Last night's reading: http://www.flickchart.com/blog/hold-your-applause-the-case-for-and-against-clapping-in-a-cinema/ https://chicagoist.com/2012/02/14/movie_rant_clapping_in_a_movie_thea.php I have a friend irl who is highly reactive to even the whispered intimation of "being told what to do." It makes her make some decisions that are contrary to her best interests. I don't understand it, but I recognize it as a cultural response. OTOH, when I think someone in conversation is trying to impose his or her will on me, I can get rather reactive myself. And I generally don't regret doing so. Different methods of individuation, I guess.
  7. I think the theatres have been told to play the movie fairly loudly, because I read about one person's experience where someone complained (imagine that) it was too loud. The movie theatre accommodated that person, and the person who wrote about it thought it was way too low. My husband thought the movie was too loud, but I thought it was glorious and perfectly calibrated, being surrounded by the music. And normally I'm the one who prefers music not being too loud. I'm guessing that it was distributed to theatres with the suggestion of sound level, but hopefully Bruce wasn't so officious (pretentious) as to make such a request. LOL You know, when Bruce spent so much time on sound checks when he switched to large arenas, people appreciated his concern for the fans. Funny how things change. No one said, "If he really cared about his fans, the tickets would be free. And then he'd take us all out for dinner at a nice restaurant." Nor did they say, "Why is he so pretentious that he thinks people want to hear his music? He wants to force good acoustics on us. The nerve!"
  8. If you are debating whether or not to attend the movie or wait til the video comes out, I really believe it is a movie that shines particularly with the music surrounding you and the large screen inviting you into the barn. The sound and ambiance are simply gorgeous. (If while you're in a movie theatre, you don't feel the need to do things that are only appropriate in the privacy of your home, that is. LOL)
  9. Actually, it's sad. Sad that you have to tell people to behave with courtesy for your fellow movie-goers. There is no doubt in my mind that he is asking for us, the audience who is actually there to hear what he has to say, as well as sing, and not out of any "pretentiousness" nor self-aggrandizement. Do you really think at this point that Bruce Springsteen shouldn't take himself seriously as an artist? Do you really think he hasn't earned that? It doesn't matter, either way. This is about people behaving with a modicum of civility and respect for others who have "paid the cost" to see the Boss. In a very different setting. This talking and cheering stuff is relatively new. I saw Rocky (the first one) in the theaters and no one cheered. Maybe in subsequent Rocky movies they did. And depending on where you see movies, there is sometimes serious interaction with the film/audience (and I'm not talking about Rocky Horror, which of course, made its money on film/audience interaction). All of which to say, I think the word "pretentious" is being misused here. And I suspect it's more related to the Western Stars album than it is the request for people to behave in a way that allows other moviegoers to hear the movie. I'd be fascinated to know the correlation between people who don't like Western Stars (the album) and people who think this request is pretentious. "How dare the rock and roller who encouraged audience participation in the 80's request the opposite? How dare he do this Jimmy Webb-styled album? He's too big for his britches." I just think this line of questioning is weird. And entitled. It's not like it's required by the state to see the movie in a theatre, after all.
  10. Happy to say it didn't happen at either of the shows I saw.
  11. Yes. But technology that doesn't impose subtitles on those who are not hard of hearing and who would find it distracting.