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Tanqueray&Wine

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Everything posted by Tanqueray&Wine

  1. It is believed the Russian's intervened in the American election with the intent of sewing discord. Mission accomplished.
  2. I love lists. Greetings; For You, Blinded, Does this bus stop at 82nd street WIESS; Rosalita, Kitty’s Back, New York City Serenade Born to Run; Thunder Road, Born to Run, Jungleland Darkness; Darkness, Candy’s Room, Adam Raised a Cain The River; The River, The Price you pay, Sherry Darlin’ Nebraska; Atlantic City, Nebraska, State Trooper Born in the USA; Downbound Train, I’m Goin’ Down, Dancing in the dark Tunnel of Love; Brilliant Disguise, Cautious man, Spare Parts Human Touch; Human Touch, Cross my Heart, I wish I were blind Lucky Town; Better Days, Living Proof, If I should fall behind Ghost of Tom Joad; The Ghost of Tom Joad, Youngstown, Straight Time The Rising; The Rising, Lonesome day, Nothing Man Devils and Dust; Long Time Comin’, Devils and Dust, Matamoros Banks Magic; Long walk Home, Last to Die, Radio Nowhere Working on a Dream; Kingdom of Days, The Wrestler, The last carnival Wrecking Ball; Wrecking Ball, Land of hope and dreams, Swallowed up. Western Stars; Somewhere North of Nashville, Western Stars, The Stuntman
  3. Posting with authority was not my intention, hence the disclosure.
  4. Firstly, Funniest.Thread.Ever. To Daisy's point: the only thing I know about Swift is a lot of her songs bitch about ex-relationships and probably without any sense of redemption or how it defined the protagonists personal growth through painful experience. Springsteen explores relationships in intimate, sometimes gut-wrenching depth, and from both sides of the schism. So, If the breakdown of a relationship leaves me heartbroken and in need of soul searing honesty, I'll listen to Springsteen. If I just want to pour a bucket of chicken manure in that persons car, I'll listen to Taylor Swift. *Disclosure: I have not listened to much, if any, Taylor Swift though media reporting on her genre approach is less easy to avoid.
  5. Long Time Comin' Always really enjoyed the Devils & Dust album as a whole. Sometime after I became a father in '13 it struck deep, relating to the fear of passing on the worst in ourselves to our children. Then the way it finishes, with the warmth of a campfire, the love family brings and with the hope of a better man emerging. Now it is one of my very favourite songs.
  6. 'The Losin' Kind' is punctuated by subtle moments of quiet brilliance. Every line builds on small moments and inward feelings, which lead to the sad inevitability of the lead character's surrender to fate. The ominous warning: "it was there in the heart of Wilsonville where I met my fate." The seduction: "I pulled her close, she didn't mind." (One of my very favourite Springsteen couplets. Admit it boys, that little moment in the pursuit when you know - is always intoxicating). "and what I knew kinda slipped my mind." (oh yeah, which often leads to that moment if only)…….. The moment: "It was there I hit that guy too hard but I knew when I hit him for a second time." The kick in the guts: "Well sir I'll think that one over if you don't mind, Now luck ain't much good to you when it's the losing kind."
  7. It's a rock song about a balladeer perhaps? I saw one definition of ballad as ' a slow sentimental or romantic song.' If it's based on tempo then is there a technical range ballads sit within? I admit it is hard to classify Jungleland as a ballad but as a third party narration it's hard to beat.
  8. I like the third party narration as a definition. It rings true (think the ballad of queenie and rover, ballad of a thin man, ballad of Billy the Kid). And it forced me to dig deep into the list of songs in which Springsteen sits outside and does not adopt a character within the narrative. Choices were thin on the ground in terms of ‘best’ so for some songs the narrator is present but purely as an observer Eg; Wreck on the Highway and Point Blank to a lesser extent. Jungleland Johnny 99 Incident on 57th street Lost in the flood Reason to Believe Point blank Wreck on the highway Wild Billy’s circus story Johnny bye bye Devil’s Arcade I thought about Kitty’s Back’s place on this list but it is just too funky to be called a ballad by any other definition. Jungleland gets a nod due to the epic nature of the story unfolding as told by an outsider looking in.
  9. Thanks Humph, that's an important distinction for baseball players who walk off if they get hit.
  10. The smartest opinion Bono ever expressed in relation to music was to name Because the Night “the song we wish we had written” when inviting Patti Smith and Springteen onto stage at Rock ‘n Roll Hall of Fame.
  11. If he'd only squeezed in "he could bowl that sandshoe crusher by you" it would have more sense down here.
  12. So here I go again with the Thunder road tetralogy. Maybe now a pentalogy? Firstly, Mary does get in. With the beauty and rising hope of that introduction how could she not? There was however, no happy ending. Together they take a stab at romance and pursue the dream with the only thing available to them: a car. Thunder road is full of the wild hope and enthusiasm of young people still believing the dream is within reach. Then the months and years of Racing in the Street, chipping away, race after race, getting nowhere near the promised place to where they originally set out to win. Enthusiasm is replaced by bitterness, as Mary returns to the safe life of a house in Fairview, our anti-hero simmers in the Darkness on the Edge of Town. It is a place where the dream is hung onto with desperation, haunted by the secret he can’t face and thinks Mary never had the passion to defy: that sometimes we don’t cut loose from the things that hold us in place and it is this that eventually drags us down. The time in the story when things fell apart between the two of them. Mary went home, the anti-hero continued on alone into the Darkness. Years later when the dream is dead and only bitterness remains, this failure is at the heart of The Promise that is broken. It’s why Mary left, to play it safe. Its why our anti-hero is working a job he hates, spending his time looking back at what could have been if only. Moonlight Motel could certainly connect to the first four, after the bitterness has faded but there is no sense of reunion, only reflection. The motel may have been a regular layover for the two of them as they travelled the circuit together and where Mary ushered the “whispered secret I promised I’d never tell.” But of course we look back to The Promise’ and we know he did, which is why we find him drinking shots alone in the car park of an abandoned Moonlight Motel. This goes to the heart of Springsteen’s philosophical evolution, from songs exalting the American dream to songs which realise the American dream is out of reach for many. Certainly for many of the characters he writes about. Some of whom come to reflect on the loss of hope whiles others are consumed by it.
  13. Sounds like a typical Friday night at my house.
  14. sorry, but I'm going 1 + 10 (Thunder road – Bruce) Deeper Water – Paul Kelly Bow River – Cold Chisel Over the hills and far away – Led Zeppelin The day I tried to live – Soundgarden Ace of Spades – Motorhead Gimme Shelter – The Rolling Stones Boom Boom – John Lee Hooker Mercy seat – Johnny Cash Man Overboard - Do-Re-Mi Velouria - The Pixies
  15. I think we agree it is a bloody good album. For mine Dry Lightning will go deep: from Youngstown, Straight Time, Ghost, Dry Lightning - but hey, that's what the poll is for right? Highway 29 is an interesting one. Good song but as the supposed final realisation of The Losin' Kind, I much prefer the Nebraska era outtake.
  16. I'll second this. Though it is such a balanced album, picking favourites is not an easy task. Love this album from start to finish.
  17. Might be way off mark here but I seem to recall Murder Incorporated was the working title of BITUSA right up until it was shelved from the album. Love the song, ripping raw power. The tempo of the song matches the narrative. It feels paranoid, holed up, edgy.
  18. I've been thinking about this thread since posting yesterday (but yeah, not obsessed). How do I try to describe it? Regardless of my mood, Bruce has got the album match, whereas any other act I need to be in the mood to go to it. And those latter moods die out relatively quick. During the release phase of Western Stars someone on here asked "would you have listened to this album if it was by someone else?" The answer is no. At first listen I was unsure of the country sentiment but I feel like I owe him for the music he has given me over the journey and I trust him to deliver. In time, this trust has been rewarded, and in no small part due to the way the journey was shared. When you can see his characters represent so clearly an evolution of himself, and ourselves, then the emotional investment in every line is powerful. As a young man I was immediately moved to tears by young Janey's triumph over abandonement and fear in Spare Parts but it took me 10 years and fatherhood to be moved to tears by Long Time Comin.' I was an exhuberant, irresponsible young man, an angry young man, a man of growing responsibilities, darkening fears, flaws and selfless love. There is more to come I see, and time to reflect on what has been. Set me up and Ill tell it for you, friend.
  19. Thunder road is my all-time favourite song and it is also my second favourite song. Then, there is a gap at #3 BECAUSE NO OTHER SONG SHALL BE ALLOWED TO BRUSH AGAINST IT. Then Rosalita at #4. Same goes for Bruce. There are a lot of great bands at =4th. Obsessed? No. I did pride myself on a wide taste in music in my youth but I've noticed in the last 10 years the balance seems to have tipped disproportionately towards Springsteen. Maybe it's laziness. Maybe it is middle-aged stubborness.
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