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He was interesting...but I found him hard to relate to, because I am so relationship-oriented. Krakauer makes the case that he was amazing to survive the way he did, not foolish...and I agree--except the results are still the results. I understand some people found him to be a hero and others an irresponsible, hubristic fool. I just see him as somewhat enigmatic, to be admired in some ways and pitied in others. I definitely didn't feel resentful of him, as some native Alaskans did.

The movie version of ITW is fantastic, IMO. Hal Holbrook!

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He was interesting...but I found him hard to relate to, because I am so relationship-oriented. Krakauer makes the case that he was amazing to survive the way he did, not foolish...and I agree--except the results are still the results. I understand some people found him to be a hero and others an irresponsible, hubristic fool. I just see him as somewhat enigmatic, to be admired in some ways and pitied in others. I definitely didn't feel resentful of him, as some native Alaskans did.

While I put him more on the irresponsible side, I agree with your assessment overall.

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  • 1 month later...
  • 2 months later...

I've tried that one a couple times without success. My dh read it and really enjoyed so I will prolly give it another run at some point. It's not Infinite fuckin' Jest at least. LOL

I'm nearly done with Pillars of the Earth. It took Follett a little while to get it underway but I'm enjoying it. Concurrently reading Galileo's Daughter by Dava Sobel. Some of it is their actual translated correspondence and it's fascinating. You knew he got in how water with the Church but this does a good job really getting into how heretical Galileo was and how difficult that was for him - he was a man of faith, the Pope was something of a friend, and his daughters were nuns. If you enjoy science and science history you'll like it.

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Currently reading 'The Barbed-Wire University' by Midge Gillies. Not far into it so here is the blurb from the cover:

'For most allied prisoners of war, there were no heroic escapes through secret tunnels - the reality was a constant battle against boredom and brutality. Now drawing on letters and interviews with survivors, Midge Gillies casts a new light on a remarkable group of men who held onto the hope that there was life beyond the camps. These men applied their initiative to forming orchestras, building a golf course between their huts and daring surgery on the Thailand-Burma railway. There were men who attended lectures, learned new languages and, at one German camp, sat exams on such a scale that it became known as the Barbed-Wire University.'

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Just finished Predator Nation by Charles Ferguson, and The Cause by Eric Alterman. Excellent reads, and the former will most likely piss you off. Currently I'm re-reading Volume 3 of Robert Caro's biography of LBJ, Master of the Senate. Wanted to refresh myself before diving into Volume 4.

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I am actually half way through the Big Mans book and it's a must read for us diehards. It is more of stories from Clarence about his life and about his time with the E Street Band than it is a biography which I love. Some very funny stories he has of him and Bruce especially form the early days.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I have a few things on the go. Making myself angry reading Chavs by Owen Jones (it's about how the working class in Britain has been divided and demonized by political leaders and the media, and the resulting social and economic problems). Also reading The Prodigy by Herman Hesse, We Speak No Treason by Rosemary Hawley Jarman (such an underrated writer!) and Runaway Dream by Louis P. Masur :)

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I finished a couple of books last week, and haven't started any new ones yet. I can't afford to get any more Kindle books for a while after that Dublin trip, so it looks as though I'll have to go back to actual paper based books for a while! I'm not sure if my handbag can stand the added strain! I have a whole shelf full of books waiting to be read, but no inspiration to actually read any of them. They all look so BIG and bulky, I've got out of the habit of reading proper books now.

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Paul Auster, "The Brooklyn Follies"

Read it for the third time now. Not his best work, but every enjoyable.

Best book I've read in a while is "Shortcut 04 - Die St. Pauli Papiere", by my former colleague and friend Peter Prieler. Unfortunately it's only available in german. But I'd recommend it to anyone who speaks the languague.

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For Father's Day my son bought me A Confederacy of Dunces. I had never heard of the book before but a dozen or so pages in it seems to be an interesting read.

This is in my top five books of all time. The more you read it, the more you appreciate the humor. It's all about the characters and the language...the plot is almost non-existent, but the way the characters ricochet and connect around Planet Ignatius makes sense after the second reading. :)

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I've tried that one a couple times without success. My dh read it and really enjoyed so I will prolly give it another run at some point. It's not Infinite fuckin' Jest at least. LOL

I'm nearly done with Pillars of the Earth. It took Follett a little while to get it underway but I'm enjoying it. Concurrently reading Galileo's Daughter by Dava Sobel. Some of it is their actual translated correspondence and it's fascinating. You knew he got in how water with the Church but this does a good job really getting into how heretical Galileo was and how difficult that was for him - he was a man of faith, the Pope was something of a friend, and his daughters were nuns. If you enjoy science and science history you'll like it.

I couldn't get through Infinite Jest. I could barely start it. :)

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Just finished Predator Nation by Charles Ferguson, and The Cause by Eric Alterman. Excellent reads, and the former will most likely piss you off. Currently I'm re-reading Volume 3 of Robert Caro's biography of LBJ, Master of the Senate. Wanted to refresh myself before diving into Volume 4.

At some point, I am going to set aside some time and read all of the Caro LBJ biographies--it's on my bucket (reading) list...

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This was a rollicking good time...if you like dark and twisty books with unsympathetic characters. Which I do. lol You'll need to suspend some disbelief but it'll be worth it.

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You are the second person today I've seen recommending this...it's on my TBR list, and now it's moved higher. I thought highly of her two earlier books, but they are dark, dark, dark.

I recently finished Laura Moriarty's The Chaperone. I really loved it. It's ostensibly about Louise Brooks coming to NY from Kansas, but it's much, much more about her chaperone, Cora Carlisle, who has some personal investigations to do in NYC. Cora's transformation and growth unfold like a many-petalled and interesting flower; Louise's outlook on life has more impact on Cora than vice-versa. What transpires is the story of an amazing life...

Today I completed Domestic Affairs by Bridget Siegal, who worked for the Edwards and Obama campaigns. The novel is a thinly disguised retelling of Edwards' run for the Presidency, with the protagonist, Olivia, being the youngest head of fund raising in a presidential race ever...who falls for the southern governor running for President. The characters are poorly developed and you never get a sense of any of them, even Olivia, but you get lots of inside lingo as to how campaigns are funded and some descriptions of the richest fundraisers and their ways. The publisher is Weinstein Books (yes, Harvey Weinstein) and a character that seems based on him is one of the fund-raisers.

It's kind of fun to try and figure out which parts are based on "real-life" (if politics can be said to be real-life); there's a Bernie Madoff character and when Olivia finally walks out, a blonde with a videotape machine named Brianna is on board, documenting the campaign. Not very subtle. In the Acknowledgments, Ms. Siegal apologizes for her cynical view of politicians and lists the good ones she has worked with, among them Hillary Clinton, Mario Cuomo, and Terry McAuliffe (who provides a blurb for the book)...but not Edwards nor Obama. Interesting...

Beach trash for the politically minded, I don't recommend it.

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I really didn't appreciate the book fully the first time around. But I loved the part about Dick Clark...and Mrs. Levy's board. I fell in love with the hydrotable at my chiro's office and used to fantasize about buying it and living on it, like Mrs. Levy. It entertained me :)

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Oh yeah, the parts where Ignatius was critiquing tv shows and movies was great, and so true. I know plenty of people like him in that regard, who otherwise don't have many answers to the rest of life's mysteries. With the board, there were sexually suggestive assumptions I was making about it, or was I reading it wrong?

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Oh yeah, the parts where Ignatius was critiquing tv shows and movies was great, and so true. I know plenty of people like him in that regard, who otherwise don't have many answers to the rest of life's mysteries. With the board, there were sexually suggestive assumptions I was making about it, or was I reading it wrong?

I thought they were sexually suggestive, but also sublimation :)

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  • 2 weeks later...

Just finished the Steve Jobs biography. Fascinating read for anyone who's interested in the history of the computer industry in general and Jobs in particular. He could definitely be an asshole, but he had an insight into what makes people tick that few others posess. Would love to see the same author tackle Bill Gates life story. Not sure he would ever do it because he seems to posit that Jobs is the true innovator who will go down in history along with the likes of Edison and Henry Ford. In actuality I think he and Gates will be joined at the hip historically.

Anyway highly recommend it. Incidentally I read it on an iPad, but ironically using the Kindle app.

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