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9 hours ago, dr winston oboogie said:

Can send it on to you if you want, but i know you will enjoy it, let me know , please

Thank you, but when I saw I could buy it for less than I'd get it for in most charity shops (I saw it , here, last week) I sent for a good copy.  I have quite a few books that were written either by the person enduring that time or about them. I'll put this one on the top of the pile and let you know what I think.

Edit: It'll have to wait until I've read Bel Canto - just had word the library's got it. @judyg - picking it up this morning.

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Now reading this short new book by Edward O. Wilson. Interesting, (but next time I'll wait for the paparback edition). ;)

P.S. : I've finished it. Nice, but I wouldn't recommend it.

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Read a few pages of Bel Canto, @judyg - it's going back to the library today. Nothing about it 'touched' me or was of interest. But thank you, nonetheless. :) 

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I'm better at buying books than I am at starting to actually read them. This arrived yesterday and I intend to actually read it soon.

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10 hours ago, Eileen said:

Read a few pages of Bel Canto, @judyg - it's going back to the library today. Nothing about it 'touched' me or was of interest. But thank you, nonetheless. :) 

Oh well. To each his own. Sorry you didn't like it. :)

 

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I've just started with this. It looks promising.

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I haven't contributed to this thread for ages, as I have really struggled to read this book. Kept putting it down, picking it up.  Must be about a year? But I finally finished it yesterday - it didn't defeat me! I know many of you don't persevere with a book if you don't like it! I just couldn't get into it and I don't know why.

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On ‎10‎/‎18‎/‎2019 at 8:13 AM, Frank said:

I've just started with this. It looks promising.

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I know this is a common name in Holland but I checked anyway. I wonder, after seeing his photograph, if he's related (son) of the man in the middle of this photo? The tanned-looking man with the Dutch badge, left fist raised. I'll do some digging ...

 

Dad and de Waal.jpg

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I found this hugely valuable, but at times almost unbearable to read. The discriptions of this girl, growing up with no schooling literally on a scraphill, with parents who believe every conspiracy theory and then some, paired with the most self-righteous and ill-conceived religious predjudices take some beating. A father with bipolar disorder, a violent and destructive brother and lots of ill-informed relatives who cannot shake off the disadvantages of backward upbringing - the frightening thing is that I have known people like that in remote places of Utah and Idaho, and apparently they live on.

I had to interrupt reading this and turn to something soothing inbetween, but if you can stomach it, it is worth the effort. And it makes you thankful for being able to come by education in a more conventional manner.

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On 10/23/2019 at 12:12 PM, Eileen said:

I know this is a common name in Holland but I checked anyway. I wonder, after seeing his photograph, if he's related (son) of the man in the middle of this photo? The tanned-looking man with the Dutch badge, left fist raised. I'll do some digging ...

 

Dad and de Waal.jpg

Let us know!

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3 hours ago, Frank said:

Let us know!

They're all on their way back from Flushing as I type so I'm hoping one of the veterans was shown this photo. I'll give them a day to recover then pounce with my questions.  Two days, cos I'm seeing the Bruce film tomorrow night. :)

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5 hours ago, berlintramp said:

image.png.b0062d2edaedfab93be7c55364ba1440.png

I found this hugely valuable, but at times almost unbearable to read. The discriptions of this girl, growing up with no schooling literally on a scraphill, with parents who believe every conspiracy theory and then some, paired with the most self-righteous and ill-conceived religious predjudices take some beating. A father with bipolar disorder, a violent and destructive brother and lots of ill-informed relatives who cannot shake off the disadvantages of backward upbringing - the frightening thing is that I have known people like that in remote places of Utah and Idaho, and apparently they live on.

I had to interrupt reading this and turn to something soothing inbetween, but if you can stomach it, it is worth the effort. And it makes you thankful for being able to come by education in a more conventional manner.

I have this checked out right now but I'm finishing Lab Girl by Hope Jahren first which is our community's Big Read book this year. I've heard good things about Educated but I'll have to see if it's something I can read. I've been a little concerned hearing about it.

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Wichita Lineman by Dylan Jones (yep, a book about a song) is excellent.

I read that new Richard Dawkins book about evolution and God. Self opinionated nonsense.

Mark Radcliffe's Crossroads is excellent. Funny, too.

Next up is a biog of Peter Grant and a biog of Marilyn Monroe.

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And, at Bruce's suggestion, The Complete Stories of Flannery O' Connor.

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On 9/27/2019 at 2:48 PM, judyg said:

I just started Ann Patchett’s new novel, “The Dutch House.”  I love Ann Patchett; she's one of my favorite authors.  If you haven't read Bel Canto by Ann Patchett, run right out and buy a copy right now and read it. If you have already read it, then read the new one.  

Here's the NY Times book review, which called it "luminous", among other things: 

NY Times Book Review

I just finished The Dutch House. I've never read Patchett before but this was available through my libraries online service. I'll look for others of hers.

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On 10/16/2019 at 11:43 AM, Born To Walk said:

I'm better at buying books than I am at starting to actually read them. This arrived yesterday and I intend to actually read it soon.

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I just finished listening to the audiobook. I quite enjoyed it. Didn't realize Elton has had so many health issues recently.

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Back to Discworld again, a world that makes sense and makes me laugh as well as think!

Reading them in order of release, I've finished "Mort" so it'll be "Sourcery" next:-) 

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Turns out I took a detour to the Lynne Truss 'Constable Twitten Mystery' books instead, care of the library.

I wasn't sure at the start of the first book, "A Shot in the Dark", where the writer seemed to be deploying every semi-colon, colon and exclamation mark available just to demonstrate liberal use of punctuation, but once she got the story going it proved to be witty, exuberant and very cleverly done too. The second book, "The Man That Got Away", simply romped away from the start, which I much preferred.

I don't want to give any spoilers, of course, but the stories certainly play with the police detective genre in their 1950s setting of seaside Brighton society. Please note that you'd definitely need to read "A Shot in the Dark" before "The Man That Got Away", to get the full benefit and understanding of the peculiarities of the relationships formed in the first book.

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I started William Trevor's Last Stories a couple of nights ago.....been saving it for quite a few months now. If you know his stuff ....it is as good as anything he did but very much within his usual reportoir. Trying to stick to one story at night and one in the morning.

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I have just finished this and it was fascinating. I had it as a Christmas present and it is not a book I would have chosen myself, but I would recommend it. A really interesting look behind the scenes at the aristocracy in this country. Anne Glenconner was the eldest child of the Earl Of Leicester but, of course, because she is female she couldn't inherit the title or the estate. She married a man who, whilst charming, had a violent temper and was unpredictable. He bought the island of Mustique where Princess Margaret spent a lot of time. The descriptions of the balls held on the island are incredible - unbelievable amounts of money spent. She was Lady in Waiting to Princess Margaret and they became great friends. She had great tragedy in her life as her two eldest sons both died in their twenties. There are also some interesting comments on the way the aristocracy raise their children - nannies and boarding school etc.

@Daisey Jeep you would love it I think, as she speaks so highly of the royals.

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