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Right now I'm re-reading Custom of the Country by Edith Wharton in honor of her 150th birthday. It's a personal favorite of mine, because Undine Spragg, the main character, has no match in her combina

I read both of the books written by @Jerseyforniarecently.  Both were so enjoyable because they brought out many different emotions.  I highly recommend them.  

The Book Worms Christmas tree for our church tree festival - spot a couple you know!

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  • 2 weeks later...
2 hours ago, DarknessandHope said:

Picked this up at the local library last week and it was very enjoyable. Thank you.

You're very welcome!  I'm actually still reading it (haven't been reading as much lately), but I'm finding it very interesting.

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Started "The Iron King", first in a series about the French kings starting with Philip the Fair, 1300s.  Touted as "the real-life Game Of Thrones" by George RR Martin, and it should be the sort of thing I like, but it's a bit of a clunky read.  I suspect it's down to the translation as the original is in French.  I'll go on a bit further but it needs to improve if I'm to be drawn in.

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Plenty of reading: I'm currently finishing "The Revolutions Trilogy" by John Banville, comprising his books "Doctor Copernicus", "Kepler" and "The Newton Letter", and I've only got that short last book to read.

These first two books are astonishing feats of writing by Banville. He takes the reader into the singular minds, troubled lives and hectic times of his driven protagonists to a remarkable extent, conjuring imaginative insights into the inmost and external turmoil they are depicted as enduring whilst each endeavours to piece together his understanding of the universe. This isn't biography - there's an hallucinatory quality about some of the writing, which is most noticeable in "Doctor Copernicus", and anyone in need of laughs or cheering up should probably look elsewhere!  

For literary fiction fans who relish reading about real historical people and their creatively represented lives and times.

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I read Banville's "The Newton Letter", which is only very, very tangentially about Newton but serves as a kind of coda to the 2 longer books. 

It is written in the first person, unlike the previous books, and supplies a well-worn tale of a summer encounter, mistaken relationships, and revelations at the conclusion - not necessarily a story I would have turned to deliberately. It sails too close to stereotypes and cliches in its content, for me, but it has the feel of the conflicted, haphazard emotional life of the earlier books. I'm not at all sure that Banville did the earlier books a favour by including this slight material with them, frankly.

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I am reading "All this I give to you " by Delores Redondo.

I have previously read her Bazatan trilogy of crime novels set in Navarra and enjoyed them a lot. I think some of them have been made into films ( in Spanish ).

The new one is set in Galicia and is , so far , quite different but very good. I'm on page 270 of 470odd. The translation is into American which sometimes grates ( plowing , somber ) and yesterday  came across a new word ( to me)...roiled, which I had to look up.

Recommended.

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21 hours ago, robk1 said:

I am reading "All this I give to you " by Delores Redondo.

I have previously read her Bazatan trilogy of crime novels set in Navarra and enjoyed them a lot. I think some of them have been made into films ( in Spanish ).

The new one is set in Galicia and is , so far , quite different but very good. I'm on page 270 of 470odd. The translation is into American which sometimes grates ( plowing , somber ) and yesterday  came across a new word ( to me)...roiled, which I had to look up.

Recommended.

i realised, after posting that I hadn't really said anything about the book type.

 

I guess i'd characterize it as a mystery....man learns his partner is dead and then finds out that they have been living ( in part) a double life he knew nothing about...so he decides to find out more.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Sorry just started this after the sad death of the author Johnny Rogan last week.  

I thought I knew Van a bit but I am learning so much. It's a historical and social  lesson on Belfast from 1800 to the 60s at the start. Population 20,000 in 1800, 350,000 in 1900 fs. An only child growing up with liberal parents in a sectarian enclave and ignoring the bigotry. Being moody and kicked out of his first band for drinking and not fitting. At 15. 

It's great so far and looks like getting better. He isn't even in Them yet.

Edit to say, when I say he parents were liberal it's all relative. His dad had gone to work in Detroit and came back with loads of records , this broaden Van's horizons. They were not  strict church goers which was unusual in Belfast then. His mother became  a Jehovah's  Witness. That was unusual  too. His bandmate said that was not a problem, as long as you weren't a Catholic  you were left alone in Belfast.

So his mother actually brought him to the JW's  Kingdom Hall in Belfast.

And he actually worked cleaning windows when he was 17. 

It's so brilliant so far I want to next  read his Smith's  book after which Morrissey hoped the author died soon in a car crash on the M20 or wherever

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On 3/7/2021 at 2:49 PM, Johnstown Company said:

Later by Stephen King.

About half way through now, it's not a long novel. Good read, about a boy who can see and speak with the recently deceased.

I see plagiarizing people.

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9 hours ago, Flea said:

I see plagiarizing people.

My first thought ... but I don't know which came first.

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3 hours ago, Eileen said:
13 hours ago, Flea said:

I see plagiarizing people.

My first thought ... but I don't know which came first.

Hardly "plagiarising".  Ghost stories have been around for centuries.

"The story is told in first person by the protagonist Jamie Conklin who has the ability to see dead people, "but not like that movie with Bruce Willis," as he says very early on."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Later_(novel)

 

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9 minutes ago, Rizla said:

Hardly "plagiarising".  Ghost stories have been around for centuries.

I would imagine that Flea used that word instead of 'dead' ... a quip.

Lots of stories about to do with the topic - still doesn't stop a quip being funny. To some. :D

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7 hours ago, Eileen said:

I would imagine that Flea used that word instead of 'dead' ... a quip.

Lots of stories about to do with the topic - still doesn't stop a quip being funny. To some. :D

Well, yes - I got that it was a quip but it was still quite a loaded accusation.  I would read the book before using that word.   King acknowledges that people will think of The Sixth Sense, but at the same time makes it clear that he is telling a different story.

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On 2/28/2021 at 10:23 PM, NorthSideJimmy said:

Sorry just started this after the sad death of the author Johnny Rogan last week.  

I thought I knew Van a bit but I am learning so much. It's a historical and social  lesson on Belfast from 1800 to the 60s at the start. Population 20,000 in 1800, 350,000 in 1900 fs. An only child growing up with liberal parents in a sectarian enclave and ignoring the bigotry. Being moody and kicked out of his first band for drinking and not fitting. At 15. 

It's great so far and looks like getting better. He isn't even in Them yet.

Edit to say, when I say he parents were liberal it's all relative. His dad had gone to work in Detroit and came back with loads of records , this broaden Van's horizons. They were not  strict church goers which was unusual in Belfast then. His mother became  a Jehovah's  Witness. That was unusual  too. His bandmate said that was not a problem, as long as you weren't a Catholic  you were left alone in Belfast.

So his mother actually brought him to the JW's  Kingdom Hall in Belfast.

And he actually worked cleaning windows when he was 17. 

It's so brilliant so far I want to next  read his Smith's  book after which Morrissey hoped the author died soon in a car crash on the M20 or wherever

You still enjoying it ? I read the other biography by Clinton Heylin and I liked it a lot. Not sure I need to read another though.

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3 hours ago, Rizla said:

Well, yes - I got that it was a quip but it was still quite a loaded accusation.  I would read the book before using that word.   King acknowledges that people will think of The Sixth Sense, but at the same time makes it clear that he is telling a different story.

I am and always have been a big King fan.  That being said - sometimes he gets lazy and derivative.  And he DEFINITELY has trouble ending many of his recent novels (by recent, I mean within the past 20 years) without bringing in a Deus Ex Machina.

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2 hours ago, Flea said:

I am and always have been a big King fan.  That being said - sometimes he gets lazy and derivative.  And he DEFINITELY has trouble ending many of his recent novels (by recent, I mean within the past 20 years) without bringing in a Deus Ex Machina.

When he's good he's very very good, but when he's bad he's dreadful.  There's quite a few I haven't finished.  This is why I like the short stories and novellas best, because you don't need to invest much time finding out if they're any good - and mostly they are.

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11 hours ago, Rizla said:

When he's good he's very very good, but when he's bad he's dreadful.  There's quite a few I haven't finished.  This is why I like the short stories and novellas best, because you don't need to invest much time finding out if they're any good - and mostly they are.

Well I'm enjoying Later. I'm getting towards the end so will see how this one finishes. I agree that some of his recent stuff has been a bit disappointing, The Institute and Elevation for example. I often prefer his non horror stuff like 11.22.63, and Joyland (although sort of a ghost story I suppose).

Agree his recent short stories have been good.

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