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bassplayer617

I'm an Alcoholic

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After drinking for 30 years, I've recognized that I have an alcohol addiction. Now that I'm coming to terms with it, I don't know what the best treatment for me is. I don't think that the traditional route of joing AA is the best for me, as it is religion based. I've thought about trying holistic methods, or just going cold turkey. I already take a mild anti-depressant, so maybe I should talk to my doctor about increasing my dosage. Anyway, I am acknowledging that I have an addiction issue. Perhaps I do this to hide the depression, but my drinking makes me feel better. Yeah, this is a definite problem, and it's time that I admit it.

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I'm very sorry you are dealing with this. I definitely would talk to your doctor. If you don't want to do AA, I'm sure he/she will be able to point you in another direction. I know you're not a religious person based on your post, but I will keep you in my thoughts and prayers. Stay strong.

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The fact that you have admitted you have a problem is a start, I would speak to your Dr, or good friends. Take care.

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617, very brave of you to fess up to this on a public forum, I wish you all the very best.

My understanding of AA is that it is not so religously based as it used to be and they take a more rounded spiritual approach, so don't discount it completely.

Maybe just try it? I'm pretty sure no -one is going to try to ram religion down your throat, all organisations eventually move with the times, and changing beliefs and attitudes.

I know this because my mum went 'dry' for the last forty years of her life, and was a leading-light in the local branch of AA, until she passed away of a non alcohol related disease three years ago.I used to get regular 'bulletins' from her about it!

seriously, best wishes

K

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After drinking for 30 years, I've recognized that I have an alcohol addiction. Now that I'm coming to terms with it, I don't know what the best treatment for me is. I don't think that the traditional route of joing AA is the best for me, as it is religion based. I've thought about trying holistic methods, or just going cold turkey. I already take a mild anti-depressant, so maybe I should talk to my doctor about increasing my dosage. Anyway, I am acknowledging that I have an addiction issue. Perhaps I do this to hide the depression, but my drinking makes me feel better. Yeah, this is a definite problem, and it's time that I admit it.

It's pretty light on the religion stuff. There's mention of a higher power there, but you can use the group as a whole as your higher power, if that helps.

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One more thing ....the AA view would be that if you simply go 'cold turkey' as you put it, you will be what they call 'dry-drunk'.

i.e. you are still the same person., just not drinking....... but very prone to relapse.

My mum would have said that the person inside needs to change before the behaviour changes permanently

Anyway that's enough 'advice' from me............................ I'm hardly qualified myself.

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AA is absolutely NOT "religion based".

It IS a "spiritual program". You will come to understand the distinction.

That does not mean that any particular AA group might not be under the sway of someone with a different conception. One of the great things about 12-step programs in NYC is the vast array of meetings to go to. If you don't like one, if it doesn't resonate with what you feel inside, then go find another one. That freedom may be constrained in less populated areas.

And as was said above, if all you do is stop drinking then the result is unlikely to be pretty. No drug works as well on its targeted disease as alcohol works for the alcoholic. But there are consequences. AA is a way of managing the disease without alcohol, allowing you actually to enjoy life.

I'll leave you with these, "the Promises":

"If we are painstaking about this phase of our development, we will be amazed before we are half way through. We are going to know a new freedom and a new happiness. We will not regret the past nor wish to shut the door on it. We will comprehend the word serenity and we will know peace. No matter how far down the scale we have gone, we will see how our experience can benefit others. That feeling of uselessness and selfpity will disappear. We will lose interest in selfish things and gain interest in our fellows. Self-seeking will slip away. Our whole attitude and outlook upon life will change. Fear of people and of economic insecurity will leave us. We will intuitively know how to handle situations which used to baffle us. We will suddenly realize that God is doing for us what we could not do for ourselves.

Are these extravagant promises? We think not. They are being fulfilled among us—sometimes quickly, sometimes slowly. They will always materialize if we work for them."

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Also, you never know who you might meet in the AA meetings. We have a friend who's gone to meetings for 20 years and he walked into his meeting one night and Eric Clapton was in the room. I know you're not supposed to say who goes but I think it's well known that Mr. Clapton attends these meetings. Our friend had a grin on his face for a long time after that.

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Also, you never know who you might meet in the AA meetings. We have a friend who's gone to meetings for 20 years and he walked into his meeting one night and Eric Clapton was in the room. I know you're not supposed to say who goes but I think it's well known that Mr. Clapton attends these meetings. Our friend had a grin on his face for a long time after that.

Well my mum used to tell me who she had met in forty years of meetings, and it includes many UK celebs whose name I would not put up here! As you say tho Eric Clapton is hardly a secret.

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Bassplayer, Ive done a bit more amateur research.........

you dont need to adopt a God.

You just need to believe in a hgher power.

For some people who are not at all religious, this "higher power" can come from belief in the collective will and spirit of the other fellows that they encounter in meetings.

That's all you need!

Go to a meeting. And dont stop going just because you might take a drink afterwards.It might not be a miracle first-time cure but if you keep going it might work.

By going to a meeting youve already put yourself amongst a distinct 2% of all estimated alcoholics in the world, i.e. the 2% that have admitted there is a problem AND that they arent going to find the solution on their own.

best,

K

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