Jump to content

Random Thoughts + Discussion: Springsteen edition


Recommended Posts

  • Replies 1.7k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

On Wednesday I was driving my two great nephews (aged 8 and 10) to the cinema. Naturally, I had been playing Bruce on the way to pick them up, so when they got in I said, you don’t have to listen to B

P, your feelings are your feelings, but honestly, I’m not exactly sure why his age vs your age matters as to how you feel about his music.   Also, loving Bruce should have zero to do with listeni

A random intermittent thought that I've had on the previous three tours(including HH tour) is why does he love playing Darlington County and Working on the Highway so much?!Okay they're not played as

Posted Images

Didn't think it deserved it own thread but:

45 years ago this week Stevie Van Zandt made his live debut as a member of Bruce Springsteen and The E Street Band. #EStreetBand

image.png.d274b43aa2ab4d6db1a9cd524b54dbce.png

Love the name of the production company! 

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...
On 7/22/2020 at 9:42 AM, Jimmy James said:

Didn't think it deserved it own thread but:

45 years ago this week Stevie Van Zandt made his live debut as a member of Bruce Springsteen and The E Street Band. #EStreetBand

image.png.d274b43aa2ab4d6db1a9cd524b54dbce.png

Love the name of the production company! 

Oh,

GREAT show!!!!!!

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Paolo's Circus Story said:

4msQ.gif

They know your real name. :P

Link to post
Share on other sites

A friend said he's down to listen to some Springsteen, but he doesn't like listening to artists' most well-known songs, so he told me to hit him with some of the deep cuts, B-sides, and other rarities. He doesn't like knowing the major album tracks, haha. So I've tossed together a playlist of some of the best more obscure songs (Spotify playlist, so sorry, no "The Klansman") while trying to also make it flow pretty well AND cover different sounds from across his career. Here's what I've come out with so far; gotta say, I'm pretty happy with it and think it'd make a godly setlist:

 

1. New York City Serenade

^ A fantastic closing track, but also a fantastic opener that I think this friend of mine will really respect musically and that'll immediately blow whatever preconceptions he's got about Bruce out of the water.

 

2. I Wanna Be With You

3. Be True

^ After a nearly 10-minute, atmospheric, melodic opener, hit him with some all-out rock in the form of two great River outtakes: a personal favorite in "I Wanna Be With You", whose count-in and first guitar notes make it a great one to say "Okay, NOW the playlist properly starts" before a great performance from the ESB together -- followed by an obviously all-time beloved outtake in "Be True".

 

4. Soul Driver

^ Hits him with something off "the worst album" that keeps the rock energy going but puts a bit of a darker spin on it, to transition into another darker rock song in

5. Worlds Apart

before moving on to a couple outright darker, more minimal songs whose musical palette I think my friend will particularly dig:

 

6. Life Itself

7. Magic

 

Then after a couple atypical, darker songs, go right back into some classic, ultra old-school E Street Band energy and give him some pure Jersey vibes with:

8. Seaside Bar Song

9. Thundercrack

If we're keeping it to obscure songs and so I can't include "Jungleland" or "4th of July, Asbury Park (Sandy)", these aren't bad picks themselves.

 

Then keep the uptempo vibes going, but fast forward a bit to some of the more typical, 80s rock, with:

10. Brothers Under the Bridges ('83) - how has this never been played live??

11. Jackson Cage - not an outtake, but still a more obscure River cut than most

and cap it off really quickly with a true classic deep cut:

12. Held Up Without a Gun

After that 1-2-3 punch of 80s rock, we dial down the tempo a bit for something that's got a bit more of a flowing melody to it with an ultra-obscure album track that's got an interesting, unique vibe for a Bruce song:

13. The Fuse

I think my friend would really dig that song. And to go even further towards modern stuff and really show off the diversity of the catalog, we've got two really unique songs with some great pop appeal:

14. I'll Work for Your Love

15. Surprise, Surprise

(I'm considering slotting in another slow, stripped-down song after "The Fuse" -- like a "Stolen Car" or something -- but not sure which, and the playlist is already long as-is. But as you can tell, I like to have a kind of ebb and flow of tempos and styles on my mix playlists, and I think getting one more slow song between Hel Up and I'll Work would be optimal -- though "The Fuse" is pretty long and immersive as-is.)

 

"Surprise, Surprise" might seem like a weird cut, but screw you haha it's a 60s pop radio hit from 2009 and it's idiosyncratic as hell, which is what my friend's here for. It's a fun song. Of course, if those last two are a little... fruity, in a way my friend doesn't necessarily vibe with, we go to an ESB classic that IMMEDIATELY sucks you in on the classic rock vibes in:

16. Kitty's Back - One of a couple songs where I'm cheating a little and it's not THAT obscure... but it's also not Rosie, Incident, or anything off BTR. You've still definitely gotta be a fan before you find this song, at least. So I think it's a valid pick. If the rapid-fire, long-term flurry of sounds that is "Kitty's Back" is a little too loose for him, I wanted a song that starts with a distinct, soft opening to follow it, and for a true deep cut, I think a great pick is:

17. Night Fire - I LOVE the sound of that piano after Kitty.

And it's paired here with 18. Whitetown, the other breaking-glass-and-running-feet outtake, just as it is on the Ties box set. I usually listen to these two as a pair, and they complement each other incredibly well. To follow "Whitetown", we go with another melodic, soft (but not quite SLOW) song with nice, smooooth prediction in a classic outtake:

19. Janey Don't You Lose Heart

Now here, I wanted to go with something a little darker and quieter, so I chose a personal favorite:

20. Down in the Hole, because I had to have some dark song to build up to a song I think could be my friend's favorite:

21. State Trooper - I know he'll like this one, but it was hard to figure out where to put it haha, this song's jarring no matter what. Ultimately, the solution was to just sandwich it in between two other really dark songs, and so:

22. Wages of Sin - Continuing to drag the vibe of the playlist way, way down (especially as we get further along), with some dark songs I think he might dig. I thought of putting this one up near "The Fuse", but it's a really good follow-up to "State Trooper", which is hard to find.

23. Breakaway - A big personal favorite, massively underrated deep cut, had to be here somewhere. Nearish to the end as the playlist gets sadder and quieter, and follows the sadness of the prior tracks while raising the sound a bit, and transitioning very well into fellow Promise track:

24. Save My Love - We're not done having fun just yet! This lost classic is a good way to lift the energy back up one last time while having some really similar musical elements to "Breakaway".

25. It's Hard to Be a Saint in the City - Hard to make this one fit in too seamlessly anywhere really, but I feel like my friend would really dig the poetic stylings of Greetings/WIESS. As with "Kitty's Back", this isn't quite as obscure as the others here, but still not one the layman knows, and it's better than like MQoA or "The Angel" lol so. I would have loved to go w/ "Blinded by the Light" somewhere, but I think it's a little too well-known. Continuing the more uptempo vibes with:

26. Take 'Em As They Come - The apocalyptic lyrics and kind of intimidated, nervous delivery of the song's music make it a prime fit for a later appearance in a playlist rather than an earlier one, so it's a good song to keep some rock energy going while really winding us down towards the end. Also found that with how abruptly this song starts, you really can't put it right after a slow song. (Maybe I could swap it w/ Saint in the City, though?)

27. Two Faces  - Really approaching the "darker, thoughtful songs" home stretch of the playlist now with a song whose psychological vibes and cool, distinctive, unexpected synth-y bits I could see registering with my friend. And to bring the downtrodden vibes to their ultimate depth... I know it's not everyone's favorite here, but I think my friend might appreciate the ultra-underrated, ultra-bleak, unrelenting dirge of:

28. Swallowed Up (In the Belly of the Whale) - Plus, if you want deep cuts, this is definitely one to go to. I think this song definitely could stand out to my friend who's clearly looking for the off-kilter, obscure tracks. This is a hell of a distinctive one. And to follow up its absolute bleakness, we explode into a grand climax for the playlist....

29. ROULETTE - NO FURTHER DANGER..... Self-explanatory here, completely wakes him up after the last two, it's an explosive final rock song for the album, but starts just gradually enough with the drums.

30. Something in the Night - Another one where I'm semi-cheating with a quasi-well known song, but does a great job helping to aid the somber vibes of the playlist's end while still having a bigger rock sound.

31. The Price You Pay - I mean, if I'm making an "obscure Bruce songs" playlist and not putting this near the end of it, just rescind my membership from this board, right?

32. Gave It A Name

33. Paradise

As with "Two Faces" and "Swallowed Up", going for some stripped-down, emotional, thoughtful vibes to wind the playlist down towards a conclusion.

34. How Can A Poor Man Stand Such Times and Live? - Song has a kind of crashing down vibe of finality about it that, with the tickin' of the opening drums, works really nicely as a very, very final, ultimate bit of rock on the album, amidst quieter material. And tbh maybe it's just that the opening drums sound similar to MCOR lol

35. Dream Baby Dream - He enjoys Suicide, and if you put this one on a mix, it's gotta be at the end.

 

Overall, seriously happy with how a lot of this flows - especially everything up through "Held Up Without A Gun", Janey/Down/State/Wages, and the cluster of songs near the end as a whole. Couple things I might adjust, though:

- the order of the last few songs in general Not "Paradise" / "How Can A Poor Man...?"/ DBD, that's probably staying intact... but maybe put "Roulette" after TPYP or something, to get it closer to the end as a grand finale? But it breaks up the slow songs nicely and I really like having it after "Swallowed Up". Might put SitN a track or two later, it could maybe fit in between "Gave It A Name"/"Paradise" without quite disrupting their somber vibe. And I'm still not sure on "The Fuse" / "I'll Work" / "Surprise, Surprise"; it'd be nice to get a more stripped-down song before or after "The Fuse" potentially, but idk which one I'd want to shift earlier without taking away from the end too much. I feel like a couple of those types of things can be shifted, I dunno.

 

Listen to 'em in order. Let me know your thoughts. But overall I'm definitely pretty happy with it. Just a couple more placements to tweak I think. Might still swap Take 'Em / Saint so the more rockin' one follows SML directly and the outro of Saint goes nicely into 2Faces. In fact yeah I'll probably do that. Take 'Em would work well near the end, but it's not THAT close to the end as-is and, like, there's gotta be over 40-50 Bruce songs that would work near the end of a playlist lol so

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, ProveItAllNight747 said:

Just checked out that BTX place,its site layout is vastly inferior to GL,I felt like I was back in 2001 trying to navigate through it.

their layout's not the worst I've seen (that would be vhlinks, the Van Halen forum),  It's really not so bad, but it's better looking here.

the main problem there is the incredible fighting that goes on over there, the abuse so many lay out on people

  • Like 1
  • Sad 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Daisey Jeep said:

@CrushOnOutlawPete something weird is going on with the quoting 

But i love your playlist 

I really love the dark tracks you choose

I've only just got back on, been getting weird error messages for almost 24 hours now when trying to access any thread

Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, Bosstralian said:

I've only just got back on, been getting weird error messages for almost 24 hours now when trying to access any thread

It seems worse on the sub forums

Weird messages in orange font about 14 seconds to post 

Im surprized i don't have multible duplicates not just double ups

But Good to see you Bosstralian 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Since this is random thoughts and discussion, Springsteen edition,

I just wanna say I love this review of The Wild, The Innocent, and The E Street Shuffle:

 

The Wild, The Innocent And The E Street Shuffle - Columbia 1973.

nine.jpg


If lower-class urban romance in the East Side Story vein is your cup of shit, this is the album you've been searching for your whole life through! Sandy, Kitty, Rosalita, Wild Billy - they're all here and ready to party!!!! This is Bruce's voice - full up, front and center; the man can tell a damn story. And this record is full of great tales. Love and fear - beauty and hopelessness. Serenading sweet Spanish girls in the steaming city summer sun, walking down the boardwalk past the carnival gypsies - if you've got any sort of romantic side, these words and images will stick with you; the fantastic wall-of-music background will make sure of it.

Some dumbass professor at my old college once told his class that "Born To Run is the most complete musical statement ever made." Now, rather than naming about 50 albums that outdo that fine LP, I'm only going to point out that this Wild album manages to keep me in a fantasy world for a good 47 minutes straight every time I listen to it - something I don't even think Born To Run is even attempting to do. This is Bruce at his most epic and grandiose and, as such, either his most exciting or his most laughably bombastic, depending on whether you're willing to suspend your disbelief and buy into this romanticized vision of everyday life in early '70s New York Shitty. Me? I buy. And I don't even really like the title track! Did I mention how beautiful "Wild Billy's Circus Story" and "New York City Serenade" are? The fourth piano chord in the "Serenade" melody alone almost brings me to tears of joy every time I hear it. Maybe I'm just becoming "one of them"??????

http://markprindle.com/springa.htm

  • Like 2
  • Bruuuuce! 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/7/2020 at 6:57 AM, CrushOnOutlawPete said:

34. How Can A Poor Man Stand Such Times and Live? 

Reading the list I thought something like 'if you really want to make a playlist of obscure songs that do not sound like most people think Bruce Springsteen sounds, there has to be a Seeger song on it-and then it turned up on the end, although not a song that was on the original Seeger album.

Very nice! -also the inclusion of the deepest cut of them all, Swallowed Up In The Belly of the Whale.

If you want to include a very untypical Bruce Springsteen song, how about including Wild Billy's Circus Story and Rocky Ground? (and Outlaw Pete, but that could give problems for time reasons).

Dead Man Walking and Missing? (both obscure and both very, very underrated songs).

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, Lampi said:

Dead Man Walking and Missing? (both obscure and both very, very underrated songs).

Yes.

And Loose Change.

  • Like 1
  • Love Love Love! 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Rizla said:

Yes.

And Loose Change.

:)

Probably my highlight of tracks

Met her at a friendly little bar down along the coast
She said it was her birthday so we had us a nice little toast
Drove around for a while, smoked a few cigarettes
Took her back to my place, she slipped off her party dress
She sat for a while on the edge of the bed just talkin'
Loose change in my pocket
Loose change in my pocket

Pint of gin in my boot cuff, I'm drivin' for a drink and a dance
Sittin' on the next stool, miss a little time on her hands
Yeah I knew she was trouble, but trouble sure was lookin' fine
And when I pulled her close what I knew kinda slipped my mind
We lay in bed and watched the moon come up crawling
Loose change in my pocket
Loose change in my pocket

I pour another drink, wait for the night to get through
Stars are burning in that black void so far away and blue

Now I'm sittin' at a red light I feel somethin' tickin' way down
The night's moving like a slow train crawling through this shithole town
Got my bags packed in the back and I'm tryin' to get going again
But red just goes to green and green goes red and then
Then all I hear's the clock on the dash tick-tocking
Loose change in my pocket
Loose change in my pocket

  • Like 2
  • Love Love Love! 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Such a mysterious song.  We are left to fill in the gaps, but there's something really ominous about that last verse.
It needs a thread of its own. 

  • Like 1
  • Love Love Love! 1
  • Bruuuuce! 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I adore Loose Change. It's a multilayered gem.

Please, ladies, start a thread, I'm at work and can't right now!
 

  • Like 2
  • Bruuuuce! 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/7/2020 at 3:01 PM, soulcrusader78 said:

Since this is random thoughts and discussion, Springsteen edition,

I just wanna say I love this review of The Wild, The Innocent, and The E Street Shuffle:

 

The Wild, The Innocent And The E Street Shuffle - Columbia 1973.

nine.jpg


If lower-class urban romance in the East Side Story vein is your cup of shit, this is the album you've been searching for your whole life through! Sandy, Kitty, Rosalita, Wild Billy - they're all here and ready to party!!!! This is Bruce's voice - full up, front and center; the man can tell a damn story. And this record is full of great tales. Love and fear - beauty and hopelessness. Serenading sweet Spanish girls in the steaming city summer sun, walking down the boardwalk past the carnival gypsies - if you've got any sort of romantic side, these words and images will stick with you; the fantastic wall-of-music background will make sure of it.

Some dumbass professor at my old college once told his class that "Born To Run is the most complete musical statement ever made." Now, rather than naming about 50 albums that outdo that fine LP, I'm only going to point out that this Wild album manages to keep me in a fantasy world for a good 47 minutes straight every time I listen to it - something I don't even think Born To Run is even attempting to do. This is Bruce at his most epic and grandiose and, as such, either his most exciting or his most laughably bombastic, depending on whether you're willing to suspend your disbelief and buy into this romanticized vision of everyday life in early '70s New York Shitty. Me? I buy. And I don't even really like the title track! Did I mention how beautiful "Wild Billy's Circus Story" and "New York City Serenade" are? The fourth piano chord in the "Serenade" melody alone almost brings me to tears of joy every time I hear it. Maybe I'm just becoming "one of them"??????

http://markprindle.com/springa.htm

 

Validating mprindle@nyc.rr.com...

Validation results

confidence rating:3 - SMTP
The email address passed this level of validation
without an error. However, it is not guaranteed to be
a good address.  more info

canonical address:<mprindle@nyc.rr.com>

 

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/7/2020 at 3:01 PM, soulcrusader78 said:

I don't mean to rag on the E Street Band, or Bruce, but it's taken me years not to retch whenever I hear him bellowing with the band behind him, and I still can't deal with it enough to like most of his stuff. I'm sure I'll like more of his output over time - he can be a great lyricist, an accomplished guitarist, and a very moving performer, as this album certainly shows - but Christ, Clarence Clemons is a lucky motherfucker, isn't he? That guy has two saxophone solos at most.

Overall, this probably gets an 8, rationally. The sound, the lyrics and the atmosphere get a 10 - one of my favorite albums from a production standpoint, without question - but the melodies don't.

http://markprindle.com/springa.htm

 

 

Nebraska

 

thepublicimage79@hotmail.com
Nebraska is probably the one Springsteen album I've found I can tolerate and really, really like. It's a pretty damn common opinion to have with people who are non-Boss fans that Nebraska is, in actuality, a fantastic album. (And of course, by "common" I mean "like five people or so.")

Going song-by-song on this album would be moronic - it's not the kind of album you can really do that with. So, a little background. Bruce was supposedly living through a pretty bad period of depression when he wrote and recorded these songs in his specially designed recording room in New Jersey. All of these songs were originally recorded on a Tascam Portastudio 4-track - granted, a professional engineer was operating it, but you know...it sounds amazing for a fucking 4-track.

Trivia about this album:

1 - Mastering apparently involved an echo unit, which accounts for at least some of the ambience.
2 - Apparently, if you listen hard enough, you can hear cars going by outside Bruce's house.
3 - "Born In The USA" was originally recorded as an acoustic-only demo around this time too, supposedly.

Basically, all of these songs were demos, and he meant to turn them into your general E Street Band rouse-a-ramas. But, he just couldn't get them to work with the band - the arrangements cluttered up the songs and screwed them up. Bruce had been carrying these songs around on a cassette for a while, I think for almost a year, when he finally got the idea to release them as is - just acoustic guitar, harmonica and lead vocals, with a little mandolin, backing vocal and synthesizer added when he saw fit after the fact.

Highlights on this album include "Nebraska" and "Johnny 99," about as cold and chilling as folk songs get about killing, with fascinating differences in narrative tone, "Atlantic City," one of Springsteen's finest songs, the harrowingly sympathetic "Highway Patrolman," and the incredibly tense "State Trooper" (which Bruce appparently ripped off of Suicide, though I've heard Suicide and it doesn't sound like one of their songs melodically...) It does trail off a little after that, although "Used Cars" and "Reason To Believe" are nearly as good as the songs I've mentioned. For the most part, the melodies can be pretty sketchy - what's the difference between "Mansion On The Hill" and "Used Cars" musically? I really, really don't hear much of one, except that the lyrics and the vocals are better on "Used Cars" - but on an album this atmospheric and depressed, it often doesn't matter.

I don't mean to rag on the E Street Band, or Bruce, but it's taken me years not to retch whenever I hear him bellowing with the band behind him, and I still can't deal with it enough to like most of his stuff. I'm sure I'll like more of his output over time - he can be a great lyricist, an accomplished guitarist, and a very moving performer, as this album certainly shows - but Christ, Clarence Clemons is a lucky motherfucker, isn't he? That guy has two saxophone solos at most.

Overall, this probably gets an 8, rationally. The sound, the lyrics and the atmosphere get a 10 - one of my favorite albums from a production standpoint, without question - but the melodies don't.

 

haha

Trivia about this album:

1 - Mastering apparently involved an echo unit, which accounts for at least some of the ambience.
2 - Apparently, if you listen hard enough, you can hear cars going by outside Bruce's house.
3 - "Born In The USA" was originally recorded as an acoustic-only demo around this time too, supposedly

he wrote and recorded these songs in his specially designed recording room in New Jersey. All of these songs were originally recorded on a Tascam Portastudio 4-track - granted, a professional engineer was operating it,

 

Cars outside house?  He was right about BITUSA though! 

Batlan was a roadie not an engineer, he went out and bought the tape deck

recorded at rented house next to Swimming River reservoir, Colts Neck, NJ Dec-Jan 3 1982

On April 26 1982 band assembled at Power Station to record his demos

First day tried Atlantic City all day

next day 4 takes of Born In the USA, including the album version

also electric versions of Downbound Train, Glory Days, Darlington County, Working on the Highway (Child Bride)

next week Murder Incorporated, My Love Will Not Let You Down

these were "Electric Nebraska" sessions

then pulled out his cassette from Jan 3 and asked Toby if it could be mastered

that became Nebraska

the electric stuff went on BITUSA 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...