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JustDan

The Rolling F**king Stones...

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..are back......& they're definitely not dead yet....There's a reason why they're called the greatest rock 'n roll band in the world...Really proud to be a fan of this living legend band.

 

Stones Rock Chicago

1157480010.jpg?crop=900:600&width=1910

https://www.rollingstone.com/music/music-live-reviews/rolling-stones-chicago-comeback-concert-review-851420/?fbclid=IwAR3G8GyEHJJorDvezVl6S5yonU85HruGUhxV8YiIFfIrvOWfNQqEIstBlw4

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Thanks Dan ....Fairly straightforward set list so i don't feel TOO bad not going. Just hoping they don't do a full album Exile on Main Street tour.... I'd have to hit the 401K for that one i guess 

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16 minutes ago, Early North Jersey said:

Thanks Dan ....Fairly straightforward set list so i don't feel TOO bad not going. Just hoping they don't do a full album Exile on Main Street tour.... I'd have to hit the 401K for that one i guess 

Imagine a tour or show consisting only of material from Beggar's Banquet, Let it Bleed, Sticky Fingers & Exile.... :o

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2 minutes ago, JustDan said:

Imagine a tour or show consisting only of material from Beggar's Banquet, Let it Bleed, Sticky Fingers & Exile.... :o

They could call it " A Bigger Loan Tour " :lol:

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On 6/23/2019 at 3:43 PM, JustDan said:

..are back......& they're definitely not dead yet....There's a reason why they're called the greatest rock 'n roll band in the world...Really proud to be a fan of this living legend band.

 

Stones Rock Chicago

1157480010.jpg?crop=900:600&width=1910

https://www.rollingstone.com/music/music-live-reviews/rolling-stones-chicago-comeback-concert-review-851420/?fbclid=IwAR3G8GyEHJJorDvezVl6S5yonU85HruGUhxV8YiIFfIrvOWfNQqEIstBlw4

Dan, i thought of you when i saw this on the news 

im glad Mick is doing great

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Not a big Stones fan, but it's great to see Mick Jagger back on stage again.

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On 6/22/2019 at 11:43 PM, JustDan said:

There's a reason why they're called the greatest rock 'n roll band in the world.

Don't mean to upset you, but saw them in 1978 at JFK in Philly. Simply awful. Swore I'd never waste another dollar on them (and never have).

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15 hours ago, Mocker said:

 

 

Don't mean to upset you, but saw them in 1978 at JFK in Philly. Simply awful. Swore I'd never waste another dollar on them (and never have).

You’re not a rocker......You’re a mocker.

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As I've recounted elsewhere, SAS the Stones in 1990, World Cup semi-final day. Waited & waited & waited while Mick watched the footy. Good show once they turned up but never a penny more from me.

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On 7/14/2019 at 12:19 PM, JustDan said:

You’re not a rocker......You’re a mocker.

Image result for ringo says he's a mocker

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For you, @JustDan
Today's Philly Inquirer:


The Philly farewell?

Once more with Mick, Keith, and the feeling that this may be the Rolling Stones’ last visit here.

DAN DeLUCA @delucadan

image.ashx?kind=block&href=PHQN%2F2019%2F07%2F21&id=Pc0750100&ext=.jpg&ts=20190721083213
At a Rolling Stones concert last month in Chicago, Mick Jagger and Ron Wood (left). ROB GRABOWSKI / Invision, AP
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In the beginning, they were the anti-Beatles.

The Fab Four were the cute boys next door, the mop tops you could take home to mom.

The Rolling Stones — who bring their No Filter tour to Lincoln Financial Field on Tuesday, in a date rescheduled from June due to Mick Jagger’s heart surgery this spring — were marketed as their opposites.

Mad, bad, and dangerous to know, they were the insolent rebels of the British Invasion. They brooded, and played the blues. No matter how they tried (and tried), they could get no satisfaction.

In the 2012 documentary Crossfire Hurricane, Keith Richards explained: “The Beatles got the white hats. What’s left? The black hat.”

Pop culture may have long since lost its capacity to shock, but back then the Stones were regarded as a genuine threat to polite society, especially in their native land.

As journalist Nik Cohn put it in 1969, “They were mean and nasty, full-blooded, very tasty, and they beat out the toughest, crudest, most offensive noise any English band ever made.”

At an infamous 1967 drug bust at Richards’ house outside London, police were aghast to find Marianne Faithfull wearing nothing but a rug. At the trial, Richards responded to  a scolding prosecutor with youth-culture defiance: “We are not old men. We are not worried about petty morals.”

That lack of concern with acceptable behavior — giving absolutely no blanks, in today’s parlance — remained a Stones staple, long after the licentiousness of the era faded.

That’s particularly true when it comes to Richards, who has for decades played the image of the hard-drinking heroin-shooting rock-and-roll survivor, seemingly impervious to the laws of nature.

But of course, the Stones now are old men, and have been, it seems like, for practically forever.

An amazing run

That’s because they were original youth-culture avatars of the “don’t trust anyone over 30” generation who as they’ve aged have kept pushing the limit on just how ancient you can be while continuing to do what was once considered to be childish things.

They got to be that way because unlike live-fast ‘60s contemporaries Jimi Hendrix and Janis Joplin, they didn’t die young. (Well, Brian Jones, who stood out front with Jagger and Richards in the early days, did, but that was back in 1969, half a century ago.)

And unlike the Beatles, who called it quits before they ever put a foot wrong, the Stones have — amazingly — never actually broken up. There’s never needed to be a reunion tour, because although the Jagger-Richards relationship has often been antagonistic — like many good creative partnerships — it’s never completely gone off the rails.

So after the ‘60s came to a close — unofficially, at a Rolling Stones concert at Altamont Speedway in which a member of the Hells Angels stabbed a man to death in a scene captured on film in the Maysles Brothers documentary Gimme Shelter — the Stones carried on.

And prospered. For the first decade they did so creatively. The four-album run beginning with Beggars Banquet in 1968 through Let It Bleed in 1969, Sticky Fingers in 1971, and Exile On Main Street in 1972, all with producer Jimmy Miller, stands with the most impressive winning streaks in the history of popular music, up there with Stevie Wonder in the ‘70s and not many others.

Songs from that series of dark, murky masterpieces — like “Midnight Rambler,” “Honky Tonky Women,” and “You Can’t Always Get What You Want” — are making up about half of the 20-song-or-so slightly fluid set list the band has been playing on this tour.

And though the Stones spent the mid-‘70s being less than inspired, they bounced back with one of their greatest records, Some Girls, in 1978. One deliciously dirty riff on that thoroughly sleazy album is “Respectable,” in which Jagger — who was knighted in 2003 — snidely mocked those who inhabit elevated social strata, including the Rolling Stones: “We’re now respected in society, we ain’t worried about the things that we used to be.”

They still had some good music left in them — Tattoo You in 1981, Dirty Work in 1986, and yes I will defend the underrated 2016 album of blues covers, Blue & Lonesome — but by the early 1980s the Stones started to become known as a business entity as much as a band.

They played JFK Stadium in South Philly in 1978 and again in 1981, and filled Veterans Stadium across the street several times through the early ’00s.

A moneymaking machine, the Stones pioneered tour partnerships — the Tattoo You tour was sponsored by Jovan perfume — and did a deal with Microsoft to use “Start Me Up” to launch Windows 95.

(The No Filter tour is sponsored by a nonprofit, but one well-suited to the Stones’ baby-boomer audience: the financial planning firm Alliance for Lifetime Income.)

The Stones don’t need the financial advice, and still never talk about retiring, though people have been wondering whether it was appropriate for Jagger to keep prancing around the stage at his age for decades now.

In 1983, Pete Townshend wrote an essay agonizing over what it meant for Mick Jagger to be turning 40.

Back in the 1990s, when they were merely in their 50s, they were often mocked for their decrepitude as “the Strolling Bones,” a macabre entity long past its sell-by date.

In retrospect, the Stones paved their way for generational peers. Concert arenas across the land are filled with septuagenarians: Jeff Lynne’s ELO was at the Wells Fargo Center last weekend, Queen (with the young singer Adam Lambert) is due on Aug. 3 and Elton John’s farewell tour circles back on Nov. 8 and 9.

Meanwhile, the Stones roll on. Years ago, they started getting mocked because their average age was inching close to that of the U.S. Supreme Court. But in 2019 it’s no contest: Drummer Charlie Watts (78), guitarist Ron Wood (72), and Jagger and Richards (both 75) average out at nine years older than the current Supreme Court. (The number would be lower if bassist Darryl Jones, who replaced Bill Wyman in 1993, were included. But he’s never been made an official Stone.)

But if it’s easy to tease the Stones about their senior-citizen status, their longevity also demands respect. No, they don’t write and record new songs — or at least, they don’t release them. And they will never again be able to convey the sense of menace and danger that they did in their early “Paint It, Black” and “19th Nervous Breakdown” days.

But I suspect that those who get themselves down to the Linc to hear them on Tuesday will find themselves in the presence of a vital-sounding band whose members are still intuitively attuned to one another and capable of raising a ruckus on some of the world’s greatest rock-and-roll songs, that they’ve lived with for decades.

A different feel

This time, though, it’s going to feel different. As they’ve kept coming back — last playing here on the 50 & Counting tour in 2013 — it’s been easy to take the Stones for granted, probably particularly for baby-boomer peers who have always had the band in their life.

But since this spring when Jagger underwent his heart-valve operation — which seems to be an unqualified success — the comforting sense of musical immortality has vanished.

It’s his goblin-like, possibly invincible partner who’s pictured in a popular meme: “We need to start worrying about what kind of world we’re going to leave Keith Richards.”

But the news of Jagger’s condition — despite his amazing aerobic conditioning — put the fear of no more “Jumping Jack Flash” into Stones fans’ minds, and it will turn the Linc show into a more urgent occasion.

It’s a reminder that despite the words of Philadelphia soul-music songwriter Jerry Ragavoy — originally sung by Irma Thomas before they were by Jagger — that time isn’t ultimately on anyone’s side. And that this Tuesday night in South Philly with the Rolling Stones really could be the last time. 

 

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Before the show tonight

Does anyone know where Bruce is right now? And is he near Philly for a guest appearance? :lol:

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@JustDan..........Linc review:

NO BREAKING THIS HEART OF STONES

Neither rain nor age slowed the band’s roll at the Linc.

 
By Dan DeLuca MUSIC CRITIC
image.ashx?kind=block&href=PHQP%2F2019%2F07%2F25&id=Pc0220100&ext=.jpg&ts=20190725074504

Showing no sign of age or infirmity after his April heart surgery, Mick Jagger and the Rolling Stones performed Tuesday at the Linc, their first appearance here since 2013. STEVEN M. FALK / Staff Photographer

image.ashx?kind=block&href=PHQP%2F2019%2F07%2F25&id=Pc0220200&ext=.jpg&ts=20190725074504

From the opening “Street Fightin’ Man” to the final encore of “Satisfaction,” the Rolling Stones’ two-hour set was filled with warhorses that still delivered plenty of kick.

When the Rolling Stones postponed the entirety of their No Filter tour this spring — including a June 4 show at Lincoln Financial Field — because of Mick Jagger’s medical condition, any hopes of seeing the band before summer was out seemed overly optimistic.

To say the least: The band’s septuagenarian lead singer needed heart surgery, for goodness’ sake. And even thinking about a still recuperating Jagger performing the only way he knows how — singing while strutting up and down a catwalk, when not motoring back and forth to either side of an oversize stage — was enough to give a nervous Stones fan a heart attack.

And yet there Jagger was on Tuesday night, along with his mates Keith Richards, Ronnie Wood, and Charlie Watts — aggregate age of the four: 300 — prancing and powering through a marvelously un-slick, two-hour, rainsoaked stadium show in South Philadelphia, sounding every bit as unruly and vital as you could hope they would.

At this late stage, it’s hard not to get sentimental about the Stones — a miraculously (largely) intact entity formed in 1962 that, as Jagger pointed out, has been playing Philadelphia for “54 [blanking] years.”

That 1965 show was at the long-since-razed Philadelphia Civic Center in West Philadelphia, and the band did actually play one Pennsylvania show even earlier than that, at a Farm Show in Harrisburg in 1964.

The idea is that the Stones have been around pretty much forever, a notion Jagger underscored when he seemed to mistake the Linc for JFK Stadium, the also long-gone venue the Stones played when they came to town in the 1970s and 1980s.

“Most places we used to play have been demolished, and this one hasn’t,” he said, and while he was mixing up his venues, his point was germane. Buildings, eras, styles of music, and the people that play them come and go. But the Stones carry on, seemingly immortal.

Jagger’s health scare put the lie to that, of course, while also signaling that it’s past time to stand back and appreciate all that they are, while they’re still around.

The Stones would be gray-haired, were it not for hair dye. The elegant and imperturbable Watts, a jazz lover who always only plays what’s absolutely necessary and was introduced by Jagger as coming all the way “from Preservation Hall to Independence Hall,” is the only silver fox.

But in the Stones’ case, with age also comes intuitive, next-level musical communication, and the understanding that there’s little point in attempting to replicate one’s greatest hits note for note.

The Stones couldn’t do it if they tried, so they don’t bother, instead keeping their bluesy, Chuck Berry-derived snarl intact by staying raw and in the moment, unafraid that a bum note might show up here and there.

The set list wasn’t filled with rarities. Sticky Fingers’ horn-driven “Bitch,” with dual sax action from Karl Denson and Tim Ries, was the by-request song chosen by fans on the internet. And the two-song acoustic set played by only the core four at the edge of the catwalk featured “Angie” and “Dead Flowers.”

But from the opening “Street Fightin’ Man” — the closest the Stones ever came to a political manifesto, declaring “the time is right for a palace revolution” — to the final encore of “Satisfaction,” the set was filled with warhorses that still delivered plenty of kick.

Wood and Richards weaved their uncanny twin guitars throughout the evening, with the former shining on “You Can’t Always Get What You Want,” the night’s first sing-along. In the band’s engine room, Richards and Watts played off each other, pushing and pulling the band’s shifting rhythmic foundation, keeping the sound spry.

Bassist Daryl Jones stepped out on “Miss You,” the disco-era workout that got the crowd back up out of their chairs (or rushing back from the bathroom) after a stellar two-song, Richards-sung set, including the mood piece “Slipping Away” and the delightful “Before They Make Me Run,” in which the legendary libertine remembered times when he “wasn’t looking too good, but I was feeling real well.”

And “Miss You” also was notable for achieving a measure of tenderness, with Jagger gently repeating “I miss you, girl” in a near-whispered coda as the song faded away.

Did Jagger ever show any sign of age or infirmity? Not once. Was this really a man whose health had been in serious danger just a few months ago?

There was no way you could have guessed that. His vocals were robust. Coming out on stage in a red leather jacket and black skinny jeans — and later changing into a green leather hoodie when it rained, and a top hat and floor-length coat for his Mephistopheles bit on “Sympathy for the Devil” — his peripatetic rooster dance moves are still intact, though less exaggerated and cartoonish than they once were. He’s the most fabulously fit baby boomer in the room.

He also is still a hammy, pandering, joyful showman who delights in what he’s doing. Wood, who’s an avid painter, was introduced as “the Cheesesteak Chagall.” When the band moved to the middle of the stage, Jagger referenced Eagles field goal kicker Jake Elliott.

And the clearly well briefed front man might have overdone it when, with tongue in cheek, he told of driving to Wawa to get a hoagie but being waylaid by hitting a pothole. Watts was unbothered, he claimed. “Charlie gets his hoagies from Sheetz.”

Those showbiz shenanigans would have seemed merely silly, of course, if the music wasn’t in fine working order. And though not everything went smoothly — “Paint It, Black” was a little desultory to my ears — for the most part, it hummed along.

The most thrilling moments of the evening both came after the rain started to fall an hour in.

Jagger was joined at the end of the catwalk by singer Sasha Allen — who handled backup vocals all night long with Bernard Fowler — for “Gimme Shelter.” Allen wailed away on the showstopping vocal part originally sung by Merry Clayton, as the musical high drama was heightened by the meteorological conditions.

Jagger was similarly out on the edge on his own for “Midnight Rambler,” the creeping, hardslamming blues on which he crouched down in his green leather and blew his harp for all he was worth.

And Jagger brought smiles to Watts’ and Richards’ faces when he strolled back to the main stage to lead them into a detour in the song-within-a-song of “Walkin’ Blues.” That foundational tune for the band was sung by both Robert Johnson and Muddy Waters, the latter of whom wrote a different song that, more than 50 years ago, gave the Rolling Stones their name.

Back in 2013, before the Stones last played Philadelphia, I interviewed Jagger, and he talked about what to him “rock-and-roll is really about.” For the archetypal rock front man, it boils down to one word: “Energy. It jumps out at you, even if you haven’t heard it for ages.” On Tuesday at the Linc, watching the Stones still make that leap was a wonder to behold. 

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reading about them still performing make me really happy 

but the younger ones don't always get it

Gary's daughter who is only 6 years younger than me, thinks they should retire (then she said she has no idea what my nice stuff is worth and she'd probably send it to the salvation army if she had to clear our house out .....)

im so sick of youth driven popular culture

long live Mick and Keith 

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lately ive been visiting this forum to catch up on the obituaries but from now on im going to say i visit here to catch up on Mick and Keith

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1 hour ago, Daisey Jeep said:

lately ive been visiting this forum to catch up on the obituaries but from now on im going to say i visit here to catch up on Mick and Keith

Image result for cartoon obituaries

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47 minutes ago, Mocker said:

Image result for cartoon obituaries

my old Australian neighbour says ' put his Quee in the rack '

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1 hour ago, Daisey Jeep said:

my old Australian neighbour says ' put his Quee in the rack '

I'm afraid I'll need @jukebox to translate that foreign lingo!

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12 hours ago, Mocker said:

I'm afraid I'll need @jukebox to translate that foreign lingo!

It took me awhile, but I figured it out.

"Put his cue in the rack"

As in pool cue, at the end of a game.

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On 7/28/2019 at 1:57 PM, jukebox said:

It took me awhile, but I figured it out.

"Put his cue in the rack"

As in pool cue, at the end of a game.

opps my bad spelling 

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On 7/27/2019 at 6:40 AM, Daisey Jeep said:

 

im so sick of youth driven popular culture

 

Said every adult over age 30 since time immemorial

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On 7/27/2019 at 9:57 PM, jukebox said:

It took me awhile, but I figured it out.

"Put his cue in the rack"

As in pool cue, at the end of a game.

Must be a regional vernacular.
Thanks!

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