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Blinded By The Light (Movie)

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I'm glad that's been made clear about the 'tearing up of the tickets'. Just one of the 'Eh?' moments for me as I couldn't remember hearing that mentioned back at the Fringe.

A poorly-made film - and I'm sad about his dad being portrayed in that way. The end bit probably didn't happen, either?

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19 minutes ago, Eileen said:

A poorly-made film 

Your opinion is your opinion; but sorry... I strongly disagree with that.  

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I thought you might. :)

I enjoyed the original talk though.

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I haven't read the whole thread. Has someone pointed out - complained about - that he at one point back in 1987-88 listens to the studio version of Because the Night - released 2010 -  on his walkman?  Still, I liked the movie.

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2 hours ago, TheBoss said:

I haven't read the whole thread. Has someone pointed out - complained about - that he at one point back in 1987-88 listens to the studio version of Because the Night - released 2010 -  on his walkman?  Still, I liked the movie.

Yes, that was mentioned someplace.  

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3 hours ago, TheBoss said:

I haven't read the whole thread. Has someone pointed out - complained about - that he at one point back in 1987-88 listens to the studio version of Because the Night - released 2010 -  on his walkman?  Still, I liked the movie.

Yeah, I noticed and whispered "Anachronism!" to my friend in the cinema.  But it doesn't matter, and neither does the inconsistency about The River.  At least it gives us fans a chance to be smug smartarses.  :P

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6 hours ago, whispered secret said:

I have just finished re reading the book. I enjoyed it very much and the description of 'inspired by' rather than 'based on' is very true.

A few of the stories actually happened but most of them are an amalgamation of experiences Safraz had between the ages of 14 and 20. The one thing which surprised me (spoiler coming) is that Safraz did get to see the TOL tour and his dad actually paid for the ticket. I feel bad for Mr Manzoor Snr. that he was portrayed as someone who ripped up the ticket and I was a puzzled as to why Safraz allowed that to be portrayed in the film.

Mr Manzoor Snr. is, of course, dead so he doesn't know he was portrayed in this way.

im really glad that Dad brought him the ticket because that sceen in the movie really upset me the most

Mr Springsteen enjoyed being the inspiration behind some of Bruce's songs and after he passed away Bruce stopped the dad stories

its a pity Mr Manzoir isn't here to see his son's words inspire a movie being enjoyed all over the world

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5 hours ago, Eileen said:

I'm glad that's been made clear about the 'tearing up of the tickets'. Just one of the 'Eh?' moments for me as I couldn't remember hearing that mentioned back at the Fringe.

A poorly-made film - and I'm sad about his dad being portrayed in that way. The end bit probably didn't happen, either?

i do see where your coming from

 

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5 hours ago, Daisey Jeep said:

i do see where your coming from

Good. Why would you allow your dad to be portrayed in such a light?  Was it you who gasped at the bit where he 'tore up the ticket'? The bit in the car is ridiculous.

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52 minutes ago, Eileen said:

Good. Why would you allow your dad to be portrayed in such a light?  Was it you who gasped at the bit where he 'tore up the ticket'? The bit in the car is ridiculous.

nope:lol:

(well yes,  kind of :lol:) !

i yelled out Nooooooooo ! :lol:

it did make the Dad out as the baddie and i don't think that's fare when he's not here to defend himself

remember i also misses the part where it said 'inspired by' 

considering i thought the bit in the car was kind of the climax its much more a work of fiction than i realized

its seems to have even less fact going on than the crown and that's quite an accomplishment 

next time i see it (on t.v.) while drinking a bottle of sweet cheap wine im just going to view it as 80s nostalgia with an awsome soundtrack and im hoping ill enjoy it more 

i mean the friend with the Paul Young hair do was so redicoulss maybe that was part was the comedy that went over my head

 

 

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I won't be in a rush to see it again.

Really looking forward to seeing the Western Stars film though. Hoping for some positivity in it. There seems to be an element of gloominess hanging over Bruce World at the moment. Has been for a while.

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When his dad tore up the tickets, at first I felt really bad for Safraz then I thought "Ok, now the movie will be showing him sitting at home  listening to and instead taping the radio broadcast of the legenday Stockholm concert."But..no! A lost opportunity in my opinion. :P

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On 9/12/2019 at 11:38 AM, Promise61 said:

Does anyone know if that part about him winning a scholarship to Monmouth Uni was true or not ?

Not true. However he did go to America with Roops after he answered a notice at the student union advert for youngsters to go over there for summer employment to sell encyclopedias door to door for six weeks. That's when they went to Asbury Park and the Stone Pony etc. His father tried to stop him going just like in the film though, but he ended accepting his son's decision and even paid for the trip for him.

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Reading the book again did not change my opinion of either the book or the film. 

I still think the film was really enjoyable and captured the essence of Safraz' love for Bruce and the impact the music had on him. The book was factual, the film a mix of fact, fiction and fantasy, both good in their own way.

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4 hours ago, MacBruce said:

Not true. However he did go to America with Roops after he answered a notice at the student union advert for youngsters to go over there for summer employment to sell encyclopedias door to door for six weeks. That's when they went to Asbury Park and the Stone Pony etc. His father tried to stop him going just like in the film though, but he ended accepting his son's decision and even paid for the trip for him.

what ?

why didn't they just leave him selling encyclopedias door to door

that would fit the themes of the movie

did he win a compition with his writting in school ?

did he get a piece published in the newspaper while on work experience?

wait - its ok

i just have to remember its inspired by a true story 

carry on sorry to interrupt 

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3 hours ago, Daisey Jeep said:

what ?

why didn't they just leave him selling encyclopedias door to door

that would fit the themes of the movie

did he win a compition with his writting in school ?

did he get a piece published in the newspaper while on work experience?

wait - its ok

i just have to remember its inspired by a true story 

carry on sorry to interrupt 

DJ, you’ll be happy to know that Sarfraz did report that the real life Roops actually said, “Bruce is the direct line to all that’s true in this shitty world.”  

He said some real life dialogue was interjected and it was surreal for him to hear conversations from him life up on the big screen.  

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7 minutes ago, rosiejaneymary said:

DJ, you’ll be happy to know that Sarfraz did report that the real life Roops actually said, “Bruce is the direct line to all that’s true in this shitty world.”  

He said some real life dialogue was interjected and it was surreal for him to hear conversations from him life up on the big screen.  

:lol::):):):)

i am definatly going to watch it again when it comes on tv

im sure i will enjoy it more next time by not  putting so much pressure on the portrayal of real life and just enjoying the story - probably like Bruce did :)

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The director, Gurinder Chadha made a personal appearance at tonight’s BBTL Birthday showing in London, introduced the film and then got the audience to send a birthday message to the boy himself,

https://mobile.twitter.com/GurinderC/status/1176266900692750337?ref_src=twsrc^google|twcamp^serp|twgr^tweet

 

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On 9/12/2019 at 1:40 AM, Promise61 said:

The greatness of the monumental Thunder Road should not have been subjected to a Mary Poppins / Kids From Fame dance-a-long in that sequence.

It was a sort of dumbing down, for me.  Almost insulting.

:(

I agree, but I think even worse was what was done to the greatest, most important lyrics of Badlands. ("for the ones who had a notion, a notion deep inside, that it ain't no sin to be glad you're alive...")

The most life-affirming lyrics Bruce ever wrote, are turned into a joke in this, in a world where somehow you can passionately quote/sing lyrics to bullies (in this case, racist ones), and somehow *magically* it defeats them!

That has to have been the worst moment for me in the film. I hope it doesn't continue to linger in my mind when I listen to Badlands, lessen the song for me. I don't want to picture or think of that horrendously stupid, ridiculous scene.

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The depiction of the working class 80's in the UK was raw and realistic. The depiction of the kid's fandomship of Bruce on the other hand I found rather superficial and borderline cheesy. 5 out of 10 for me.

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17 hours ago, jukeblue said:

For anyone who hasn't seen the film yet it is showing Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday this week at the Mockingbird a small cinema in Digbeth (Peaky Blinder territory) for £3.95

https://ticketing.eu.veezi.com/sessions/?siteToken=etrhh0m2xpra010jp0khfs56mw

Only managed to see it once.

Hopefully it gets a Netflix release and is also released soon on DVD and Blu-Ray.

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2 hours ago, soulcrusader78 said:

I agree, but I think even worse was what was done to the greatest, most important lyrics of Badlands. ("for the ones who had a notion, a notion deep inside, that it ain't no sin to be glad you're alive...")

The most life-affirming lyrics Bruce ever wrote, are turned into a joke in this, in a world where somehow you can passionately quote/sing lyrics to bullies (in this case, racist ones), and somehow *magically* it defeats them!

That has to have been the worst moment for me in the film. I hope it doesn't continue to linger in my mind when I listen to Badlands, lessen the song for me. I don't want to picture or think of that horrendously stupid, ridiculous scene.

That was my 'head-in-hands' scene. Dire.

Just makes me smile now, to think of it. Silly.

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4 minutes ago, redwire said:

The depiction of the working class 80's in the UK was raw and realistic. The depiction of the kid's fandomship of Bruce on the other hand I found superficial and almost cheesy. 5 out of 10 for me.

Well, the kid in the film was like me in early 1982. Apart from not being Pakistani, the depiction was the nearest thing I have ever seen on the big screen to watching a part of my own life pass in front of me. That was me in my last year at High School. That was the effect Bruce's music had on me when I first heard it as a seventeen year old. I thought it was a wonderful film, and very moving.

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2 hours ago, soulcrusader78 said:

I agree, but I think even worse was what was done to the greatest, most important lyrics of Badlands. ("for the ones who had a notion, a notion deep inside, that it ain't no sin to be glad you're alive...")

The most life-affirming lyrics Bruce ever wrote, are turned into a joke in this, in a world where somehow you can passionately quote/sing lyrics to bullies (in this case, racist ones), and somehow *magically* it defeats them!

That has to have been the worst moment for me in the film. I hope it doesn't continue to linger in my mind when I listen to Badlands, lessen the song for me. I don't want to picture or think of that horrendously stupid, ridiculous scene.

The scene is not really meant to be taken too seriously !

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