High As Hope

Masterpiece Albums

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40 minutes ago, Jimmy James said:

One statement: Do you believe we as a group (don't know how many thousands are on this board, and on BTX) we would be here without BITUSA? 

Do you mean that without BITUSA Bruce would not be the megastar he is, and, therefore sites like GL would not exist? Or do you mean would I/we still love him without that album?

My answer to the second question is an emphatic yes!

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44 minutes ago, Jimmy James said:

One statement: Do you believe we as a group (don't know how many thousands are on this board, and on BTX) we would be here without BITUSA? 

including me 

who remembers some of the dreadful teeny bopper sounds around in 84/84 ?

for all i know i could be on some Wham! board right now without that album

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1 hour ago, Jimmy James said:

One statement: Do you believe we as a group (don't know how many thousands are on this board, and on BTX) we would be here without BITUSA? 

I 'discovered' him at 16 in 1978, so BITUSA or not wouldn't have made any difference to me.

Not a great fan of the album, (unless it's an album of outtakes) but those shows were stunning.

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1 hour ago, whispered secret said:

Do you mean that without BITUSA Bruce would not be the megastar he is, and, therefore sites like GL would not exist?

Personally I fell that without BITUSA and the money it brought, there isn't a TOL, TGOTJ, D&D or others to discuss here. Would the record company have given him the freedom to do those projects? 

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2 hours ago, Jimmy James said:

One statement: Do you believe we as a group (don't know how many thousands are on this board, and on BTX) we would be here without BITUSA? 

I would not

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Just now, Jimmy James said:

Personally I fell that without BITUSA and the money it brought, there isn't a TOL, TGOTJ, D&D or others to discuss here. Would the record company have given him the freedom to do those projects? 

That’s hard to know for sure.  

But it can’t be denied that even though Bruce had many, many hard core fans, prior (myself included) to the release of BITUSA... there’s no question that that album propelled him into superstardom and brought in many, many new fans he might not have had otherwise.  

Side note: I personally love the BITUSA album, and thought that tour was fantastic.  

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37 minutes ago, Jimmy James said:

Personally I fell that without BITUSA and the money it brought, there isn't a TOL, TGOTJ, D&D or others to discuss here. Would the record company have given him the freedom to do those projects? 

I think that's a very good point. Prior to BITUSA Bruce was just a great rock star with some great albums behind him, and was a big live draw particularly in the States and Europe. BITUSA and the massive sales of that record and especially the monumental success of the tour transported him to megastardum worldwide and I think allowed his record company basically to give him the license to write and record what he wanted to thereafter because they knew that, because of the success of BITUSA, it would still sell very well on the back of such a triumph. The live box set released in November 1986 basically closed that first chapter of his career, and the next studio album Tunnel of Love despite being a total change in style from BITUSA was still a big seller at the time. Quite a number of the newer fans who were picked up in the mid 80's fell away when the 90's hit and we started to get the likes of The Ghost of Tom Joad and the double release of Human Touch and Lucky Town. I would say though that from about the mid 90's onwards Bruce then gained and retained a substantial hard core fanbase across the globe which has for the main part stayed with him ever since.

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3 hours ago, Jimmy James said:

One statement: Do you believe we as a group (don't know how many thousands are on this board, and on BTX) we would be here without BITUSA? 

Actually, yes. And no.

It's like an unstoppable train, we all jumped on at different stations but we're all going in the same direction.

And that's only thing that really counts, don't you feel so?

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14 minutes ago, took me long enough said:

the gimmick/publicity of it

What was the gimmick of BITUSA?

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Bruce's classic masterpiece albums !

The triple crown:

Born To Run

Nebraska

Darkness On The Edge Of Town

 

Followed by the following masterpieces:

The Wild, The Innocent & The E Street Shuffle

Born In The USA

Tunnel Of Love

The River

The Rising

Magic

Wrecking Ball

Western Stars

 

If "The Promise" would be considered as an album and not as a sampling of outtakes, it would belong to the masterpiece category.

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9 hours ago, Jimmy James said:

Personally I fell that without BITUSA and the money it brought, there isn't a TOL, TGOTJ, D&D or others to discuss here. Would the record company have given him the freedom to do those projects? 

I think a few years further down the line than the mid 70s would Bruce have been given the opportunity to record a third album?

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How much does a cover influence an album? I've picked up the odd album just from it's cover.

I know there has been criticism of certain Bruce covers.

Does it make a difference if having painted the Mona Lisa you then go to the pound shop for a frame to put it in?

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15 hours ago, Lampi said:

The Velvet Underground & Nico, the most influential album of all time).

I love all things 60s and 70s rock, definitely including the Velvey Underground - genuine question though as I’ve never really looked it up:

Am I the only one who thinks this album would be 1000 time better had Nico not been on the album? Not to sound overly harsh but I just don’t like her voice and feel Lou Reed could have done a better job singing on her tracks 

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Often stated how much I love BITUSA, certainly a masterpiece in my eyes in terms of the songwriting (again, seriously underrated) and the music, which literally defines 80s rock. Hard to compare it to Darkness of BTR as they are from two very different musical eras, but certainly I wouldn’t argues against all 3 being considered masterpieces

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20 hours ago, 100yrsOld said:

The whole concept of 'masterpiece' is tricky in its definition and pretty much a warped mental structure in substance. ....
Well, then in this case we could arguably define as masterpiece Bruce's entire body-of-work (his music AND his stories) without distinction of time or format: it becomes really noteworthy as a whole. The masterpiece is his life of work. 

Finally a definition I was looking for but did not have in mind. I agree completely, thanks!

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4 hours ago, High As Hope said:

How much does a cover influence an album?

Having spent a lot of time in AP from the time I could barely walk, the Greetings cover was what first got my attention.  

I’d never heard of Bruce, when at the age of 13 saw the album in the record store window.  I got so excited and exclaimed in the exuberance of a young teen how it was ‘so cool...just like the post card...’.  The friend I was with bought it for me a few months later for my 14th birthday.  

With the Greetings cover I felt an immediate personal connection.  

Can’t think of another album I bought (or wanted) not knowing, or having some sort of interest in the artist.  

What were some of the ones you bought solely  for the cover?  

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14 hours ago, Jimmy James said:

Would the record company have given him the freedom to do those projects? 

Probably not.

But at least Bruce could have said he did not want his ass on the cover of the album.:D

(Better choice: the sleeve for the Born In The U.S.A. 7" (and 12") vinyl single).

Must say, for Bruce Springsteen fans pre-BUSA, to see Bruce suddenly becoming the greatest rock star in the world, with disco remixes, very bad videos (for DTID and I'm On Fire; Glory Days is a good video), the Rambo image and an album with his ass on the cover, must be very weird, or odd, or strange.

Again, sometimes people seem to forget that it was all part of the 'deal'  with Columbia: Bruce got permission to release Nebraska, Columbia would get their big commercial hit album.

And what a great album it is.:)

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2 minutes ago, Lampi said:

Must say, for Bruce Springsteen fans pre-BUSA, to see Bruce suddenly becoming the greatest rock star in the world, with disco remixes, very bad videos (for DTID and I'm On Fire; Glory Days is a good video), the Rambo image and an album with his ass on the cover, must be very weird, or odd, or strange.

Can only speak for myself and my small group of friends with whom I witnessed the shift... 

It was a bit strange, but we were all so very happy for him (and for the new fans that discovered him through this album), and joyously took everything that followed (except the ticket stress!!!!) as it came.  

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6 minutes ago, rosiejaneymary said:

took everything that followed (except the ticket stress!!!!) as it came.  

Thinking of it, the misunderstanding of the song Born In The U.S.A. as a supposed patriotic anthem, even now after all those years, can be annoying.

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Just now, Lampi said:

Thinking of it, the misunderstanding of the song Born In The U.S.A. as a supposed patriotic anthem, even now after all those years, can be annoying.

That has, is, and always will be, extremely aggravating.  

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4 minutes ago, Lampi said:

Thinking of it, the misunderstanding of the song Born In The U.S.A. as a supposed patriotic anthem, even now after all those years, can be annoying.

For some reason many people only seem to hear the chorus and ignore the verses. It’s not a hard song to understand at all. 

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3 minutes ago, Declansk said:

For some reason many people only seem to hear the chorus and ignore the verses. It’s not a hard song to understand at all. 

Exactly right.  

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1 hour ago, Lampi said:

Thinking of it, the misunderstanding of the song Born In The U.S.A. as a supposed patriotic anthem, even now after all those years, can be annoying.

Yes, and it's also a bit annoying that the song itself made it so incredibly easy to misunderstand Bruce Springsteen. Ever noticed that there are always American flags in a European stadium crowd? As late as 2012, We Take Of Our Own was misunderstood almost immediately, as a pro-American patriotic song, at least by people I knew. Because it was Bruce, it seemed to be a given that this was a pro-American song along the lines of Toby Keith, for example. I had to point the meaning out to quite some surprised people.

Pre-BITUSA I'm pretty sure Bruce wasn't percieved as this wholesome, 100 % American guy (but correct me if I'm wrong).

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4 hours ago, Lampi said:

Again, sometimes people seem to forget that it was all part of the 'deal'  with Columbia: Bruce got permission to release Nebraska, Columbia would get their big commercial hit album.

Put this way it sounds really bad and I don't think it's totally accurate.

BUSA was conceived together with Nebraska, recording sessions overlapped, and themes and lyrics bear many similarities.

It is true that BUSA has a much more mainstream feel to it and that greatly helped these beautiful songs to achieve planetary acclaim.

But it wasn't conceived to be a commercial success, although the record company's promotion tried to exploit every bit of it for their own gain.

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