A Saint in the city

Western Stars - The Movie thread

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@Buddhabone, you are not worthless.  Far from it.  Look at that beautiful piece that you've written.

Thank you for describing the album and the film in such a heartfelt way.  I think you've nailed it.

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3 hours ago, Buddhabone said:

I will post this in hopes it finds you well. I will include these two quotes as an introduction to what I have written. The first one is a favorite quote from a movie where a Texas law man has decided to quit working at the only thing he knows how to do. For me its connected to Western Stars...the 2nd is in my opinion the seminal moment that makes Springsteen who he is and has fueld his artistry. He would never had made Western Stars or any other of his works without this central truth. As you will see what I get from the music is an affirmation that it's ok to be at a loss. Its ok to have thse feelings and we are not alone...

The law man is eating breakfast on one of the first days hes no longer doing his life's work. He is describing a dream he had...
"Okay. Two of 'em. Both had my father. It's peculiar. I'm older now'n he ever was by twenty years. So in a sense he's the younger man. Anyway, first one I don't remember so well but it was about meetin' him in town somewheres and he give me some money and I think I lost it. The second one, it was like we was both back in older times and I was on horseback goin' through the mountains of a night....goin' through this pass in the mountains. It was cold and snowin', hard ridin'. Hard country. He rode past me and kept on goin'. Never said nothin' goin' by. He just rode on past and he had his blanket wrapped around him and his head down...and when he rode past I seen he was carryin' fire in a horn the way people used to do and I could see the horn from the light inside of it. About the color of the moon. And in the dream I knew that he was goin' on ahead and that he was fixin' to make a fire somewhere out there in all that dark and all that cold, and  I knew that whenever I got there he would be there. Out there up ahead." - No Contry for Old Men

Now those whose love we wanted but didn't get, we emulate them. That's the only way we have, in our power, to get the closeness and love that we needed and desired. So when I was a young man looking for a voice to meld with mine, to sing my songs and to tell my stories, well I chose my father's voice. Because there was something sacred in it to me. And when I went looking for something to wear, I put on a factory worker's clothes, because they were my dad's clothes. And all we know about manhood is what we have seen and what we have learned from our fathers, and my father was my hero. And my greatest foe. Not long after he died, I had this dream, I’m on stage, I’m in front of thousands of people, and my dad's back from the dead and he’s sitting in the audience and suddenly I'm kneeling next to him in the aisle, and for a moment we both watched the man on fire on stage. And then my dad who for years, he sat at the kitchen table, unreachable, but I was too young, I was too stupid to understand was his depression. Well I kneel next to him in the aisle, and I brush his forearm, and I say, "Look dad. That guy on stage - that's how I see you." My Father's House (Broadway 2018)


I live in a house that was purchased for me by my in-laws after I got married and had my son, we live in a small farming community and life has been good here...it is from this spot I reflect on things and listen to this music. I am now safe and sound thanks to recovery, mental health care, and the love of my family. I have been trying to make sense of what Western Stars, the movie and the record mean to me...I want to share my feelings with you guys because I have to. It means so much to me and it has sustained me and this might make sense to you. Towards the end of Bruce's autobiography he says to write your own story and as this music washes over me I have found the space to do that. You are reading this so I was happy with the result. 

I grew up in chaos. My Mom was a drug addict who didnt know how to do anything and consequently, my sister and me are a bit mechanically useless. My Dad was always mad about something, seemed to be greatly dissatisfied in his life and we learned to hide. We learned to make due and found ways to relieve the pressure. Our parents divorced and we had to live with our Dad after our Mom disappeared over the summer once. She didnt come back for 15 years. I lived with my Dad and his unpredictable emotions and discovered a deep love of Springsteen music as a way to make sense of what had happened and what was happening around me. His songs were a map out of this place I found myself. The crushing hand of fate was all around, In Darkness on the Edge of Town I found my twin's confession and saw myself in it and it will always be sacred. I am here because of what this music does to me and I enjoy hearing what others feel listening to it as well...You all know my story....Western Stars came to me in a bit of a crisis moment. I am unemployed and have been having trouble finding work. My uselessness is magnified these days. This music comes to me in this moment. 

I see things more clearly now that I saw the movie. I have never seen an artist bare his soul in a work so well. I see this project as a reflection of that man who needed to emulate his father. We are all in a sense that person. I have always seen his work a reflection of my life history. This record is uncanny in its ability to have found me where I live emotionally. I know My story is intertwined in the characters in all of the songs. I am the hickhiker, lost out on the road not connected to anything. The Wayfarer at once in need of connection but moved to move on. I see myself in Tucson Train and Western Stars. At one moment fleeing home to move somewhere hoping to find redemption. To be honest, the train we are left waiting for is the hope that it'll all be ok some day. Western Stars is the moment you realize the cake has been baked and you are left with all there really is left is expierience things "just again" and will never be new again. That man in the song, and most likely Springsteen himself is that man to be gratful for just waking up the next morning havin made it through another night. I am feeling really similarly now emotionally in this place I am residing currently. The stunt man is the risktaker in all of us. We need to risk to be alive, but at what cost? It is a heavy one to be addicted to jaywalking despite knowing the pain of getting hit or falling. But the freedom of the fall is magic as I fly through the air. Chasing wild horses is my current favorite as I have been an angry or sad person for so long. I regret what that has stolen from me. The final three pieces on the record bring it all home...The intro to Miracle in the movie was so moving, to me it means we all have lost that ability to see things like we did when we were young, that sense of amazement and wonder is gone. So the miracle is gone and we mourn its loss. I see us all as parentless children in search of that connection after it has left us. Hello Sunshine may be one of the most beautifully simple things he has ever written. Instead of sharing his personal story in it...he wishes us well on our search for happiness.

In the end this is a love letter to all of us in our own spaces and perspectives. We are all connected to this music and I wanted to share my own personal reading on it.
 

I couldn't decide on "thanks" or "love love love."

There are some posts where a double-tap reaction is necessary.

Thanks for sharing this, bro. We should try and hook up for the next tour when it comes to L.A.

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@Buddhabone 

I love how once you open your soul, your writings become a waterfall of honest emotions, and pure love for Bruce. 

 

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I never bother reading long posts here, but I made an exception for your one Buddhabone. You seem a remarkable person and I’m sure your story will resonate with many others. 

Western Stars for me is Bruce now, it’s his new music, it is more, it is a new direction for him. E Street Band is for him “just again”. I think he will regret not touring with this masterpiece of an album. I bet he would enjoy it more than another ESB tour. 
 

 

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Does anyone know when the live run through of the album in Bruce’s barn was performed and what the time gap is between the studio recording of the album? 

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1 hour ago, Buddhabone said:

I will post this in hopes it finds you well. I will include these two quotes as an introduction to what I have written. The first one is a favorite quote from a movie where a Texas law man has decided to quit working at the only thing he knows how to do. For me its connected to Western Stars...the 2nd is in my opinion the seminal moment that makes Springsteen who he is and has fueld his artistry. He would never had made Western Stars or any other of his works without this central truth. As you will see what I get from the music is an affirmation that it's ok to be at a loss. Its ok to have thse feelings and we are not alone...

The law man is eating breakfast on one of the first days hes no longer doing his life's work. He is describing a dream he had...
"Okay. Two of 'em. Both had my father. It's peculiar. I'm older now'n he ever was by twenty years. So in a sense he's the younger man. Anyway, first one I don't remember so well but it was about meetin' him in town somewheres and he give me some money and I think I lost it. The second one, it was like we was both back in older times and I was on horseback goin' through the mountains of a night....goin' through this pass in the mountains. It was cold and snowin', hard ridin'. Hard country. He rode past me and kept on goin'. Never said nothin' goin' by. He just rode on past and he had his blanket wrapped around him and his head down...and when he rode past I seen he was carryin' fire in a horn the way people used to do and I could see the horn from the light inside of it. About the color of the moon. And in the dream I knew that he was goin' on ahead and that he was fixin' to make a fire somewhere out there in all that dark and all that cold, and  I knew that whenever I got there he would be there. Out there up ahead." - No Contry for Old Men

Now those whose love we wanted but didn't get, we emulate them. That's the only way we have, in our power, to get the closeness and love that we needed and desired. So when I was a young man looking for a voice to meld with mine, to sing my songs and to tell my stories, well I chose my father's voice. Because there was something sacred in it to me. And when I went looking for something to wear, I put on a factory worker's clothes, because they were my dad's clothes. And all we know about manhood is what we have seen and what we have learned from our fathers, and my father was my hero. And my greatest foe. Not long after he died, I had this dream, I’m on stage, I’m in front of thousands of people, and my dad's back from the dead and he’s sitting in the audience and suddenly I'm kneeling next to him in the aisle, and for a moment we both watched the man on fire on stage. And then my dad who for years, he sat at the kitchen table, unreachable, but I was too young, I was too stupid to understand was his depression. Well I kneel next to him in the aisle, and I brush his forearm, and I say, "Look dad. That guy on stage - that's how I see you." My Father's House (Broadway 2018)


I live in a house that was purchased for me by my in-laws after I got married and had my son, we live in a small farming community and life has been good here...it is from this spot I reflect on things and listen to this music. I am now safe and sound thanks to recovery, mental health care, and the love of my family. I have been trying to make sense of what Western Stars, the movie and the record mean to me...I want to share my feelings with you guys because I have to. It means so much to me and it has sustained me and this might make sense to you. Towards the end of Bruce's autobiography he says to write your own story and as this music washes over me I have found the space to do that. You are reading this so I was happy with the result. 

I grew up in chaos. My Mom was a drug addict who didnt know how to do anything and consequently, my sister and me are a bit mechanically useless. My Dad was always mad about something, seemed to be greatly dissatisfied in his life and we learned to hide. We learned to make due and found ways to relieve the pressure. Our parents divorced and we had to live with our Dad after our Mom disappeared over the summer once. She didnt come back for 15 years. I lived with my Dad and his unpredictable emotions and discovered a deep love of Springsteen music as a way to make sense of what had happened and what was happening around me. His songs were a map out of this place I found myself. The crushing hand of fate was all around, In Darkness on the Edge of Town I found my twin's confession and saw myself in it and it will always be sacred. I am here because of what this music does to me and I enjoy hearing what others feel listening to it as well...You all know my story....Western Stars came to me in a bit of a crisis moment. I am unemployed and have been having trouble finding work. My uselessness is magnified these days. This music comes to me in this moment. 

I see things more clearly now that I saw the movie. I have never seen an artist bare his soul in a work so well. I see this project as a reflection of that man who needed to emulate his father. We are all in a sense that person. I have always seen his work a reflection of my life history. This record is uncanny in its ability to have found me where I live emotionally. I know My story is intertwined in the characters in all of the songs. I am the hickhiker, lost out on the road not connected to anything. The Wayfarer at once in need of connection but moved to move on. I see myself in Tucson Train and Western Stars. At one moment fleeing home to move somewhere hoping to find redemption. To be honest, the train we are left waiting for is the hope that it'll all be ok some day. Western Stars is the moment you realize the cake has been baked and you are left with all there really is left is expierience things "just again" and will never be new again. That man in the song, and most likely Springsteen himself is that man to be gratful for just waking up the next morning havin made it through another night. I am feeling really similarly now emotionally in this place I am residing currently. The stunt man is the risktaker in all of us. We need to risk to be alive, but at what cost? It is a heavy one to be addicted to jaywalking despite knowing the pain of getting hit or falling. But the freedom of the fall is magic as I fly through the air. Chasing wild horses is my current favorite as I have been an angry or sad person for so long. I regret what that has stolen from me. The final three pieces on the record bring it all home...The intro to Miracle in the movie was so moving, to me it means we all have lost that ability to see things like we did when we were young, that sense of amazement and wonder is gone. So the miracle is gone and we mourn its loss. I see us all as parentless children in search of that connection after it has left us. Hello Sunshine may be one of the most beautifully simple things he has ever written. Instead of sharing his personal story in it...he wishes us well on our search for happiness.

In the end this is a love letter to all of us in our own spaces and perspectives. We are all connected to this music and I wanted to share my own personal reading on it.
 

Thanks for the gift of love and honesty you share with us.

Springsteen’s concerts and records have given me some of my greatest friends.

The truth of your post has within it many important lessons but certainly that sense of community your post reflects and inspires in others is beautiful.

Im not the biggest fan of WS but as I sat in the theater on Saturday night it was impossible not to be amazed and humbled at the vulnerability and soul searching revelations of the man.

Your post reminded me of that and stands on its own as an example of the best this sight has to offer.

Peace Buddahbone 

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I just saw the film.  It's a nice film, it's a nice album.  It still doesn't blow me away.  I'm glad it does all of you and I'm glad Bruce was able to create this for himself and his fans.  But for me...bring on E Street.

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dear @Buddhabone

that made me cry

imho  this is why Darkness is the greatest album ever

and why WS is a masterpiece in its own righr 

but your awsome ! 

and there is  a job out there with your name on (and mine too)

 

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3 hours ago, Buddhabone said:

I will post this in hopes it finds you well. I will include these two quotes as an introduction to what I have written. The first one is a favorite quote from a movie where a Texas law man has decided to quit working at the only thing he knows how to do. For me its connected to Western Stars...the 2nd is in my opinion the seminal moment that makes Springsteen who he is and has fueld his artistry. He would never had made Western Stars or any other of his works without this central truth. As you will see what I get from the music is an affirmation that it's ok to be at a loss. Its ok to have thse feelings and we are not alone...

The law man is eating breakfast on one of the first days hes no longer doing his life's work. He is describing a dream he had...
"Okay. Two of 'em. Both had my father. It's peculiar. I'm older now'n he ever was by twenty years. So in a sense he's the younger man. Anyway, first one I don't remember so well but it was about meetin' him in town somewheres and he give me some money and I think I lost it. The second one, it was like we was both back in older times and I was on horseback goin' through the mountains of a night....goin' through this pass in the mountains. It was cold and snowin', hard ridin'. Hard country. He rode past me and kept on goin'. Never said nothin' goin' by. He just rode on past and he had his blanket wrapped around him and his head down...and when he rode past I seen he was carryin' fire in a horn the way people used to do and I could see the horn from the light inside of it. About the color of the moon. And in the dream I knew that he was goin' on ahead and that he was fixin' to make a fire somewhere out there in all that dark and all that cold, and  I knew that whenever I got there he would be there. Out there up ahead." - No Contry for Old Men

Now those whose love we wanted but didn't get, we emulate them. That's the only way we have, in our power, to get the closeness and love that we needed and desired. So when I was a young man looking for a voice to meld with mine, to sing my songs and to tell my stories, well I chose my father's voice. Because there was something sacred in it to me. And when I went looking for something to wear, I put on a factory worker's clothes, because they were my dad's clothes. And all we know about manhood is what we have seen and what we have learned from our fathers, and my father was my hero. And my greatest foe. Not long after he died, I had this dream, I’m on stage, I’m in front of thousands of people, and my dad's back from the dead and he’s sitting in the audience and suddenly I'm kneeling next to him in the aisle, and for a moment we both watched the man on fire on stage. And then my dad who for years, he sat at the kitchen table, unreachable, but I was too young, I was too stupid to understand was his depression. Well I kneel next to him in the aisle, and I brush his forearm, and I say, "Look dad. That guy on stage - that's how I see you." My Father's House (Broadway 2018)


I live in a house that was purchased for me by my in-laws after I got married and had my son, we live in a small farming community and life has been good here...it is from this spot I reflect on things and listen to this music. I am now safe and sound thanks to recovery, mental health care, and the love of my family. I have been trying to make sense of what Western Stars, the movie and the record mean to me...I want to share my feelings with you guys because I have to. It means so much to me and it has sustained me and this might make sense to you. Towards the end of Bruce's autobiography he says to write your own story and as this music washes over me I have found the space to do that. You are reading this so I was happy with the result. 

I grew up in chaos. My Mom was a drug addict who didnt know how to do anything and consequently, my sister and me are a bit mechanically useless. My Dad was always mad about something, seemed to be greatly dissatisfied in his life and we learned to hide. We learned to make due and found ways to relieve the pressure. Our parents divorced and we had to live with our Dad after our Mom disappeared over the summer once. She didnt come back for 15 years. I lived with my Dad and his unpredictable emotions and discovered a deep love of Springsteen music as a way to make sense of what had happened and what was happening around me. His songs were a map out of this place I found myself. The crushing hand of fate was all around, In Darkness on the Edge of Town I found my twin's confession and saw myself in it and it will always be sacred. I am here because of what this music does to me and I enjoy hearing what others feel listening to it as well...You all know my story....Western Stars came to me in a bit of a crisis moment. I am unemployed and have been having trouble finding work. My uselessness is magnified these days. This music comes to me in this moment. 

I see things more clearly now that I saw the movie. I have never seen an artist bare his soul in a work so well. I see this project as a reflection of that man who needed to emulate his father. We are all in a sense that person. I have always seen his work a reflection of my life history. This record is uncanny in its ability to have found me where I live emotionally. I know My story is intertwined in the characters in all of the songs. I am the hickhiker, lost out on the road not connected to anything. The Wayfarer at once in need of connection but moved to move on. I see myself in Tucson Train and Western Stars. At one moment fleeing home to move somewhere hoping to find redemption. To be honest, the train we are left waiting for is the hope that it'll all be ok some day. Western Stars is the moment you realize the cake has been baked and you are left with all there really is left is expierience things "just again" and will never be new again. That man in the song, and most likely Springsteen himself is that man to be gratful for just waking up the next morning havin made it through another night. I am feeling really similarly now emotionally in this place I am residing currently. The stunt man is the risktaker in all of us. We need to risk to be alive, but at what cost? It is a heavy one to be addicted to jaywalking despite knowing the pain of getting hit or falling. But the freedom of the fall is magic as I fly through the air. Chasing wild horses is my current favorite as I have been an angry or sad person for so long. I regret what that has stolen from me. The final three pieces on the record bring it all home...The intro to Miracle in the movie was so moving, to me it means we all have lost that ability to see things like we did when we were young, that sense of amazement and wonder is gone. So the miracle is gone and we mourn its loss. I see us all as parentless children in search of that connection after it has left us. Hello Sunshine may be one of the most beautifully simple things he has ever written. Instead of sharing his personal story in it...he wishes us well on our search for happiness.

In the end this is a love letter to all of us in our own spaces and perspectives. We are all connected to this music and I wanted to share my own personal reading on it.
 

Thank you for sharing this with us @Buddhabone.  I'm so happy that this album speaks to you.

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4 hours ago, Daisey Jeep said:

dear @Buddhabone

that made me cry

imho  this is why Darkness is the greatest album ever

and why WS is a masterpiece in its own righr 

but your awsome ! 

and there is  a job out there with your name on (and mine too)

 

Made me cry, too, and I had just put on my before-bed eye cream! And it's okay. 

This album is so raw and vulnerable and honest--like your post, @Buddhabone. The artistry is in its universal truths, along with the personal element.

I really like the album, but the movie, with the live performance, on the big screen . . . it has taken it to a new level for me. I know I speak for more than myself when I say it makes me grateful to live in this time, this era where Bruce Springsteen's path and my own have united.

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6 hours ago, Paolo's Circus Story said:

Reading Buddhabone's post reminded me that I'm going to hear a live version of "There Goes My Miracle", and I'm super hyped for it. 

I think you're gonna love the live performances, Paolo.  I forgot what song was playing  when one of the violin players broke out in a big smile and I thought to myself, this man is a genius performer and arranger.  As I said before, I'm not a huge fan of the new album, but the live versions with the orchestra greatly enhanced my enjoyment of the music.  Looking forward to your review of the film!

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There is nothing I can add to what has already been said @Buddhabone. Thank you for sharing such a beautiful piece of writing. May you find the peace and contentment you are searching for.

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12 hours ago, Buddhabone said:

I will post this in hopes it finds you well. I will include these two quotes as an introduction to what I have written. The first one is a favorite quote from a movie where a Texas law man has decided to quit working at the only thing he knows how to do. For me its connected to Western Stars...the 2nd is in my opinion the seminal moment that makes Springsteen who he is and has fueld his artistry. He would never had made Western Stars or any other of his works without this central truth. As you will see what I get from the music is an affirmation that it's ok to be at a loss. Its ok to have thse feelings and we are not alone...

The law man is eating breakfast on one of the first days hes no longer doing his life's work. He is describing a dream he had...
"Okay. Two of 'em. Both had my father. It's peculiar. I'm older now'n he ever was by twenty years. So in a sense he's the younger man. Anyway, first one I don't remember so well but it was about meetin' him in town somewheres and he give me some money and I think I lost it. The second one, it was like we was both back in older times and I was on horseback goin' through the mountains of a night....goin' through this pass in the mountains. It was cold and snowin', hard ridin'. Hard country. He rode past me and kept on goin'. Never said nothin' goin' by. He just rode on past and he had his blanket wrapped around him and his head down...and when he rode past I seen he was carryin' fire in a horn the way people used to do and I could see the horn from the light inside of it. About the color of the moon. And in the dream I knew that he was goin' on ahead and that he was fixin' to make a fire somewhere out there in all that dark and all that cold, and  I knew that whenever I got there he would be there. Out there up ahead." - No Contry for Old Men

Now those whose love we wanted but didn't get, we emulate them. That's the only way we have, in our power, to get the closeness and love that we needed and desired. So when I was a young man looking for a voice to meld with mine, to sing my songs and to tell my stories, well I chose my father's voice. Because there was something sacred in it to me. And when I went looking for something to wear, I put on a factory worker's clothes, because they were my dad's clothes. And all we know about manhood is what we have seen and what we have learned from our fathers, and my father was my hero. And my greatest foe. Not long after he died, I had this dream, I’m on stage, I’m in front of thousands of people, and my dad's back from the dead and he’s sitting in the audience and suddenly I'm kneeling next to him in the aisle, and for a moment we both watched the man on fire on stage. And then my dad who for years, he sat at the kitchen table, unreachable, but I was too young, I was too stupid to understand was his depression. Well I kneel next to him in the aisle, and I brush his forearm, and I say, "Look dad. That guy on stage - that's how I see you." My Father's House (Broadway 2018)


I live in a house that was purchased for me by my in-laws after I got married and had my son, we live in a small farming community and life has been good here...it is from this spot I reflect on things and listen to this music. I am now safe and sound thanks to recovery, mental health care, and the love of my family. I have been trying to make sense of what Western Stars, the movie and the record mean to me...I want to share my feelings with you guys because I have to. It means so much to me and it has sustained me and this might make sense to you. Towards the end of Bruce's autobiography he says to write your own story and as this music washes over me I have found the space to do that. You are reading this so I was happy with the result. 

I grew up in chaos. My Mom was a drug addict who didnt know how to do anything and consequently, my sister and me are a bit mechanically useless. My Dad was always mad about something, seemed to be greatly dissatisfied in his life and we learned to hide. We learned to make due and found ways to relieve the pressure. Our parents divorced and we had to live with our Dad after our Mom disappeared over the summer once. She didnt come back for 15 years. I lived with my Dad and his unpredictable emotions and discovered a deep love of Springsteen music as a way to make sense of what had happened and what was happening around me. His songs were a map out of this place I found myself. The crushing hand of fate was all around, In Darkness on the Edge of Town I found my twin's confession and saw myself in it and it will always be sacred. I am here because of what this music does to me and I enjoy hearing what others feel listening to it as well...You all know my story....Western Stars came to me in a bit of a crisis moment. I am unemployed and have been having trouble finding work. My uselessness is magnified these days. This music comes to me in this moment. 

I see things more clearly now that I saw the movie. I have never seen an artist bare his soul in a work so well. I see this project as a reflection of that man who needed to emulate his father. We are all in a sense that person. I have always seen his work a reflection of my life history. This record is uncanny in its ability to have found me where I live emotionally. I know My story is intertwined in the characters in all of the songs. I am the hickhiker, lost out on the road not connected to anything. The Wayfarer at once in need of connection but moved to move on. I see myself in Tucson Train and Western Stars. At one moment fleeing home to move somewhere hoping to find redemption. To be honest, the train we are left waiting for is the hope that it'll all be ok some day. Western Stars is the moment you realize the cake has been baked and you are left with all there really is left is expierience things "just again" and will never be new again. That man in the song, and most likely Springsteen himself is that man to be gratful for just waking up the next morning havin made it through another night. I am feeling really similarly now emotionally in this place I am residing currently. The stunt man is the risktaker in all of us. We need to risk to be alive, but at what cost? It is a heavy one to be addicted to jaywalking despite knowing the pain of getting hit or falling. But the freedom of the fall is magic as I fly through the air. Chasing wild horses is my current favorite as I have been an angry or sad person for so long. I regret what that has stolen from me. The final three pieces on the record bring it all home...The intro to Miracle in the movie was so moving, to me it means we all have lost that ability to see things like we did when we were young, that sense of amazement and wonder is gone. So the miracle is gone and we mourn its loss. I see us all as parentless children in search of that connection after it has left us. Hello Sunshine may be one of the most beautifully simple things he has ever written. Instead of sharing his personal story in it...he wishes us well on our search for happiness.

In the end this is a love letter to all of us in our own spaces and perspectives. We are all connected to this music and I wanted to share my own personal reading on it.
 

 

EXTRAORDINARY post mate. And some perfect, valid and wonderfully delivered observations and reflections. 

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10 hours ago, Paolo's Circus Story said:

Reading Buddhabone's post reminded me that I'm going to hear a live version of "There Goes My Miracle", and I'm super hyped for it. 

Can't believe Bruce picks this as a highlight. I hate the song and it's one of the few deleted from my ipod! It's just the genre of music, I'm not a fan of power pop/power ballads.

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2 hours ago, bobfan1976 said:

Can't believe Bruce picks this as a highlight. I hate the song and it's one of the few deleted from my ipod! It's just the genre of music, I'm not a fan of power pop/power ballads.

I “can’ believe” you “hate” a song.

I “can’t believe” you responded to Paolo’s post slinging “hate.”

 

 

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20 hours ago, whispered secret said:

Have to say that there is no publicity for it at Picture House - no posters and no trailer, so I don't know how many tickets they will sell!

I do think whoever was responsible for distributing this film in the UK has made a mess of it. I know Rizla wanted to see it in Oxford, but couldn't find a screening then, after buying tickets for another venue, up it pops in Oxford and I am sure she & I are not the only ones who have had similar experiences.

Its been really poor. I'm going to Newark which is about 40 mins away as it wasn't showing at Sheffield but now it is and now even the local Worksop cinema is showing it 5 mins from where I live. I wish someone was showing it on a different night as I would go twice

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We have managed to get a refund on our tickets for Birmingham Odeon and booked for our local cinema, but it has been a frustrating process! 

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17 minutes ago, red headed woman said:

Its been really poor. I'm going to Newark which is about 40 mins away as it wasn't showing at Sheffield but now it is and now even the local Worksop cinema is showing it 5 mins from where I live. I wish someone was showing it on a different night as I would go twice

Newark UK this time ;)

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4 hours ago, bobfan1976 said:

Can't believe Bruce picks this as a highlight. I hate the song and it's one of the few deleted from my ipod! It's just the genre of music, I'm not a fan of power pop/power ballads.

I disliked it as well, but something's just clicked in the last 24 hours. 

Maybe there's hope for "Hello Sunshine" yet... 

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1 hour ago, Paolo's Circus Story said:

Fwiw I'm not bothering with seeing the film so there"ll just be a review of the soundtrack mate. 

Paolo,  I think you will be making a mistake by not seeing the film IF the interludes are not on the album.  To me, it is the interludes that set the scene for the great performances that follow in the movie.  I fell in love with this album even more after hearing the true meanings of what each song means to Bruce and what questions it creates for our own existence.  This movie makes us take a deeper look at our life and our dealings with struggles in life.  The line about baggage in the movie is spot on about the longer we live, the more unsorted baggage we carry is so true of someone dealing with depression.  If you haven't been there, you don't understand the feeling of hopelessness that one has.  What we see on stage is an act.  it is a facade of what really goes on deep inside the mind of someone that battles everyday with that feeling of wanting to "see that sunshine".  To truly understand "Bruce" and just how amazing his music is, you have to see the movie.  Every song he writes is a tale of the meaning of being human.  I don't want to give the movie away to those who haven't seen it but the movie did "speak to me".  It made me question my existence in life and why I choose to do what I do.  I perform on stage as well and not for an audience that is there to see me, but is forced to be there.  Being a teacher, I have to put my struggles and problems aside and put on a show night after night.  Performing for Bruce is his medicine.  His opportunity for three hours, to allow his fans and himself, a chance to get away from the struggles of everyday life and just bask in the glow of his music.  That is why music is so special.........It speaks to us in its own unique way.  It's not "one size fits all".

Is this the hard rocking E Street Band, NOPE.  But for the message it sends, the strings bring the powerful message and the violin solo in "Stones" is as powerful for that song as the saxophone solo is in "Jungleland".  This is why he is one of the best at what he does.

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I didn't get to go last night. As we (my boss and I) were in Nashville closing on a big deal. Than we were invited to play a round of golf, so we had to reschedule our flight back home and didn't get in until after the movie started last night. 

Nice comment Commish, was hoping to see you last night along with Patty C. Catch you at the next show. 

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5 hours ago, bobfan1976 said:

Can't believe Bruce picks this as a highlight. I hate the song and it's one of the few deleted from my ipod! It's just the genre of music, I'm not a fan of power pop/power ballads.

I felt the same initially when I heard it on its own ahead of the album's release. Too basic, too simple - the sort of thing that Bruce could come up with in ten minutes flat.

I was wrong. When I heard it in sequence as part of the album I changed my mind about it completely. And now I look forward to it coming up when I play the album right through. But we all like different sides of the man's work, which is as it should be.

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2 hours ago, Paolo's Circus Story said:

Fwiw I'm not bothering with seeing the film so there"ll just be a review of the soundtrack mate. 

soundtrack review works just as well

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