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If Bruce & E Street ever sound like Aerosmith & Steven Tyler

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I’m seeing Aerosmith Friday night in Vegas....Have GA tix on the stage....Should be a blast whether they suck or not.

 I saw the Grammy performance and it was a tad rough lol.

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10 hours ago, JustDan said:

That's not the Springsteen I know, the Springsteen I love

Maybe so - and the vast majority of us love that version of the guy too (many of us also like the other stuff as well but are fully aware that some don't) - but the point I was making was that an 80 year old Bruce Springsteen WON'T be that guy - hell the 70 year old version that (hopefully) comes out with the ESB in the next 12 months won't be the guy even on the last tour 4 years ago (let alone the one before that)………..I've seen this with "many" already (incl. The Who) and whilst some of them are still putting on a great show (incl. The Who) can I say that it's the version that I "really" love...…..NO! 

I was merely suggesting that Bruce has options / versions of himself that he CAN turn to as the years catch up with him (and his shows will be 2.5 hours long) that a lot of others don't really have. The alternative is to actually pack up altogether (which some in their mid 70's ARE now doing - we are seeing that - this is the first true generation of the rock star and the book is still being written...…….by the likes of The Stones). We will NOT be seeing the Bruce we know and love still rocking out with the ESB (for a full show) in 10 years time, aged 80, not gonna happen - but we will I believe (health permitting) see Bruce on a stage aged 80 doing "something", and I'm damn sure that "something" will be worth seeing!   

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13 hours ago, Jertucky said:

If Bruce and the E Street Band ever sounded like Aerosmith at any time I would never have been a fan in the first place.

Ditto. No offence to AS fans.

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5 hours ago, BruceWho said:

Maybe so - and the vast majority of us love that version of the guy too (many of us also like the other stuff as well but are fully aware that some don't) - but the point I was making was that an 80 year old Bruce Springsteen WON'T be that guy - hell the 70 year old version that (hopefully) comes out with the ESB in the next 12 months won't be the guy even on the last tour 4 years ago (let alone the one before that)………..I've seen this with "many" already (incl. The Who) and whilst some of them are still putting on a great show (incl. The Who) can I say that it's the version that I "really" love...…..NO! 

I was merely suggesting that Bruce has options / versions of himself that he CAN turn to as the years catch up with him (and his shows will be 2.5 hours long) that a lot of others don't really have. The alternative is to actually pack up altogether (which some in their mid 70's ARE now doing - we are seeing that - this is the first true generation of the rock star and the book is still being written...…….by the likes of The Stones). We will NOT be seeing the Bruce we know and love still rocking out with the ESB (for a full show) in 10 years time, aged 80, not gonna happen - but we will I believe (health permitting) see Bruce on a stage aged 80 doing "something", and I'm damn sure that "something" will be worth seeing!   

I was not chastising you personally. I was trying to convey my idea of Bruce becoming the 2nd coming of a Folk music balladeer & how strongly I feel that is not for me. Apology.

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59 minutes ago, JustDan said:

I was not chastising you personally. I was trying to convey my idea of Bruce becoming the 2nd coming of a Folk music balladeer & how strongly I feel that is not for me. Apology.

No apology needed Dan (thanks anyway) - I didn't take it that you were having a go at me or my comments, no worries, I was simply trying to point out to ALL really that unfortunately (as I've gone through it with a few loved artists already) - in terms of "that guy", we sadly have already I suspect had the best of "that" type of show (jeez some would say that happened in 1978 or 80/81 ha!)………..I feel we have probably been to the top of the mountain and are on the way down the other side now, but not in a steep decline by any means and I'm confident that there will be good things ahead still (and I only threw in those examples as alternatives to rockin' Bruce because they are tangible ones we already know of)...……….I personally, from an older slowed down Bruce later this decade, would like to see an Unplugged style show that could still be full of many classics and lots of seldom played gems etc rather than another Seeger outing...…….much as I enjoyed those shows...……..and the Unplugged format with a handful of key players would be very different to those and/or the Joad & D&D shows...…….I think they would be superb - when "that" time comes!!!...……..but until then let's hope we have another couple (at least) runs round with the ESB, after all he has 5 or 6 years before he is where The Who, The Stones, Macca, Waters, Clapton etc are NOW!!!

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15 hours ago, VABOSSFAN said:

I’m seeing Aerosmith Friday night in Vegas....Have GA tix on the stage....Should be a blast whether they suck or not.

 I saw the Grammy performance and it was a tad rough lol.

You too ought to report back.  Even for entertainment sake.

Tho defo could still be a blast, no doubt 'bout that.  

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It was actually pretty damn good....Nothing like the Grammy’s....The sound was great....Here’s a few sideway pics.

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On 1/28/2020 at 11:20 PM, JustDan said:

NO!...Christ no!....That's not the Springsteen I know, the Springsteen I love...If he wants to morph into Pete Seeger, that's his choice, but I wont be along for the ride....NO!

He was hardly morphing into Pete Seeger with that album and tour. Arguably Nebraska is closer to Seeger than the Seeger Sessions stuff. The Seeger Sessions stuff was Bruce singing Seeger songs in a Bruce way with a Bruce version of a soul folk band. It was closer to a mix of 70s Van Morrison's soul orientated celtic folk and the Nitty Gritty Band's revved up celtic Appalachian folk than Seeger imho. 

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21 hours ago, VABOSSFAN said:

9C9D1640-480C-4979-870D-C42C010B5DB6.thumb.jpeg.35587b7cbf0f7ff15f55486fa7fe0978.jpeg

Great photos,  :D

how was it, how were they ?  I bet it was awesome from that viewpoint! 
 

If it’s not too rude to ask, how much approximately are such tickets for such a show in that city? 

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5 hours ago, ukjohnney said:

Great photos,  :D

how was it, how were they ?  I bet it was awesome from that viewpoint! 
 

If it’s not too rude to ask, how much approximately are such tickets for such a show in that city? 

Stage view looks excellent. Can’t comment on the cost of those, but I have Tier 4 cheap seats, which after TM fees worked out at £90 per ticket. Venue capacity is around 5,000 according to Wikipedia

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On 2/1/2020 at 10:41 AM, J said:

He was hardly morphing into Pete Seeger with that album and tour. Arguably Nebraska is closer to Seeger than the Seeger Sessions stuff. The Seeger Sessions stuff was Bruce singing Seeger songs in a Bruce way with a Bruce version of a soul folk band. It was closer to a mix of 70s Van Morrison's soul orientated celtic folk and the Nitty Gritty Band's revved up celtic Appalachian folk than Seeger imho. 

What a perfect description.  

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Now back from CA trip, and can confirm that Steve Tyler's voice is in perfect shape.

In fact for a 71 year old he moved round the stage with impressive energy and the band put on a great show.

Good to see that differences have been resolved with drummer Joey Kramer who is back in the line-up.

Only gripe, as a casual fan, was the setlist could have featured more of the "hits", with Dude, Angel, Janey, Crying, and even the show title Deuces are Wild all omitted.

Had a chuckle re @Jimmy James comment about how much money I was saving being at the show rather than on the strip.

Re-watched Western Stars on the flight (both ways), which was interesting as had a drive through Joshua Tree National Park, where the non barn scenes were filmed. If there is to be on ESB shows in 2020, time to plan next vacation.

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So I literally have only heard one Black Crowes song, and didn't like it much. And from what I'd read about the band, I didn't think I'd like them much, either, musically or personally. But I've heard over and over about how good the drummer's autobio was, so I thought I'd give it a go. I'm about halfway in so far and it's AWESOME. For instance:

Quote

 

We loved Aerosmith. Well, we loved early Aerosmith, the 1970s bad-boys Aerosmith. Unfortunately, that Aerosmith wasn’t the band we toured with.

The Aerosmith tour simply sucked. For a million reasons, it was awful. Now, Steven Tyler was great to us. So were Tom Hamilton and Brad Whitford. But Joe Perry was a surly prick and Joey Kramer was just kinda weird. Beyond that, though, the whole setup was ridiculous. They were headlining arenas, sold out every night, and they paid us $500 a gig. We had to upgrade to a bus (no complaints about that), but we needed a full crew, too. You can’t do arenas in a van and hump your own gear. But taking thousands of dollars each week in label support meant we were going into massive debt.

We went in there thinking, This is going to be a fucking great time with a real rock ’n’ roll rock band. It was the exact opposite. The Aerosmith guys were newly, and quite aggressively, sober. The entire tour, therefore, was sober. Their whole crew, dozens of them, had signed agreements stating they wouldn’t drink. Not even on days off! As for us, our alcohol had to stay on the bus.

It was just as bad onstage. Aerosmith used triggered backing vocals, so they were basically lip-syncing to their own record. Steven sang, but most of the backing vocals were not real. Like all those weird harmonies at the end of “Love in an Elevator,” the guys would stand in a circle around Steven’s mic and pretend to do it.

We were horrified. It was like we were in eighth grade and found out our favorite athlete did steroids. We were like, “Fuck them! They’re the fucking biggest phonies!” Maybe it seems like a silly overreaction in hindsight, but we were obsessed with ’70s Aerosmith and that entire vibe.

In 1990, Aerosmith was living out a media-friendly redemption story. They were the comeback kids, and nothing was going to make them slide back to their old, druggy, rock ’n’ roll existence. They were all about living large, but in a straitlaced kind of way. Each of those guys had a security guard with him everywhere he went.

We would have been less hostile if Aerosmith had actually supported us in any way. But they undermined us, not just with the shitty pay, but also at the shows. The first night of the tour was our first-ever arena show. I don’t remember if we even got a sound check. We just walked out cold, with no idea about how to play to that size of a crowd. We were terrible. We knew it, too.

That very night, Aerosmith’s manager called Pete and said, “Hey, I gotta take your band off the tour. The crowd hated them. They can’t even play.” Apparently, Joe Perry was the one who pushed hardest to get us kicked off the tour. We had been told he was a fan of our album, and now he wanted to fire us after one day? He wanted to bring back Skid Row, a “real” band who knew how to put on a show.

“That’s not going to happen,” Pete said. “They’ve never played in an arena before. I’m coming out there tomorrow. I’m going to work with them. It’s going to be fine.”

Pete flew out for the next gig. He told us we had to get our shit together, and fast. We told him we would be fine to leave—fuck it, let’s go back to clubs. Pete said, “No fucking way are we letting this band and their fucking manager kick us around. We’re gonna get up to speed and blow their asses off the stage!

“Someone will videotape the show every day, and we’ll watch it together,” he instructed. “And then we’ll fix the mistakes. You need to learn that it’s a different way to work a crowd when you play the big rooms.”

Pete wasn’t even with us that long. It was only three days. But the change was like night and day, and most of it had to do with Chris. He took Pete’s performance direction to heart.

“Make that stage yours,” Pete told Chris. “You mark your fucking territory.”

He impressed upon Chris the need in an arena to do everything big.

One thing Chris always had trouble with was when people didn’t stand up or appear to be into what we were doing. It would get in his head and throw him off.

“Stop looking at the people that you think don’t like you,” Pete said. “Find the people that do like you and perform to them, point them out, even if they’re in the last row. Make people remember what they saw and heard when The Black Crowes leave the stage.”

Chris took to it like a fish in water. It started at the Spectrum in Philly.

“I’ll tell you one thing about Philly, man—all you people in the back are cool, it’s too bad you can’t switch places with these contest winners in the front row,” he screamed.

The people upstairs, the proletariat, fucking loved it. And the people up front were pissed! They were flipping us off and screaming, “You suck!” But finally there was some energy onstage. We could all feel it. From then on, every show was a challenge. Are we gonna win or are we gonna lose? We were determined to fucking win.

With our newfound sense of purpose, we weren’t about to let Aerosmith psyche us out. I started walking around backstage every day with a Jack and coke. The crew guys could smell the whiskey but they wouldn’t say anything. That little act of defiance felt like victory.

One night in Omaha, I decided to give the Aerosmith guys a pep talk in their dressing room. Actually, it was the dressing room for everybody but Steven, who had his own apart from the rest of the band.

I walked in and they were all getting ready for the gig, putting on their scarves and all that crap. Then, in unison, they turned to look at me like, What the fuck is this guy doing in here?

“Listen,” I announced with mock seriousness. “This is a big one tonight. It’s Omaha, and I know you guys are probably a little nervous. Think of it as a boxing match. We just jabbed the audience out there. And we jabbed, and jabbed, and jabbed. We set them up.” I started shadowboxing, stepping up my trolling game. “They’re on their back heel now. They’re wobbly. All you have to do is land that big fucking Aerosmith uppercut and finish them off!”

They stared at me for a moment in bewildered silence.

“Get the fuck outta here!” Joe Perry finally snarled.

“No problem!” I replied, and walked out laughing, drink in hand. Fuck ’em if they can’t take a joke.

 

(Hopefully some on here will find this as funny as I did. I mean..."This is a big one tonight. It’s Omaha." That's just gold.) 

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