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Albums That Influenced you


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56 minutes ago, SteveJhb said:

No 9: Tracy Chapman - Tracy Chapman

A near flawless debut. One of the first female singer-songwriters who's career I began to follow religiously. Seeing her live (twice) in 1995, an absolute dream come true. One of the most beautiful, charismatic and enchanting performers I have ever seen.

 

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 I got to see her at Carnegie Hall around Thanksgiving 1988, solo. Just wonderful.

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Day 9 and eventually I get to the most influential of all

Day 5   

No 6: Bruce Springsteen - Tunnel of Love I knew BITUSA. I had listened to and loved the Live box set. But this was the first new Springsteen album I listened to and had that 'Eureka!' moment...

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6 minutes ago, JimCT said:

 I got to see her at Carnegie Hall around Thanksgiving 1988, solo. Just wonderful.

She came here in 1995 with a full band. Saw her, was so entranced I bought another ticket to see her again.

She ended the show on her own, this diminutive person on stage alone, no guitar, singing Amazing Grace acapella. Not a dry eye in the house.

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So that’s 10 days gone in a flash. Not necessarily my 10 favourite albums, for example I omitted ‘Bat Out Of Hell’ because I didn’t see how something so unique could influence my taste going forward.

A bit of commentary, sorry that some of this will duplicate the ‘Top 10 Lifers’ thread.

1)      Bridge Over Troubled Water – Simon & Garfunkel: I got into S&G in a big way in 1975 as a result of the 6 part Radio 1 series ‘Simon & Garfunkel – Together & Alone’ broadcast on Saturdays early in the year and repeated in the Autumn to tie in with the release of Still Crazy After All These Years and Breakaway. I saw them together at Wembley Stadium in 1982 and again at Manchester Arena in 2004. I have also seem them solo numerous times, especially Paul. Maybe Greatest Hits would have been a more accurate choice, but I went with BOTW to minimise the number of compilations in my list, however I loved all their albums.

2)      Greatest Hits – ABBA:  ABBA were the soundtrack to everyone’s 1970s. This is one of the earliest albums I remember buying - £1.99 (on offer from £2.99) at Vallances Electrical store in Wetherby.

3)      1962-1970 – The Beatles: I was always aware of The Beatles but was too young at the time. Sometime in the early/mid 1970s I remember going round to my German teacher’s house armed with two C90 cassettes to tape these two double albums. Subsequently 1967-1970 was purchased from my first salary when I started working. The Beatles were a real obsession during the 1980s in particular and I still love their music.

4)      The Stranger – Billy Joel: I heard Scenes From An Italian Restaurant on the radio, which was unusual for an album track of that length to be played on daytime Radio 1. This led eventually to me buying The Stranger and I can still see myself in Vallances deciding whether or not to buy it. It proved a very good decision and Billy was soon established as one of my favourite artists.

5)      Sequel – Harry Chapin: I was aware of some of Harry’s better known songs due to their promotion by Noel Edmonds on the radio. In late 1980 this album was released and Noel played the title track every Sunday morning on his Radio 1 show. This prompted me and a friend to delve back to Harry’s earlier albums and we saw him twice in February 1981 on what sadly became Harry’s last tour. Harry – it didn’t suck!

6)      The River – Bruce Springsteen: Born To Run would have been a more obvious choice as that was the song that initially led to my discovery of Bruce and the first of his albums I bought. But The River album and tour was what cemented the deal. I remember my friend bringing round a cassette of The River to play me, and shortly afterwards I saw a small ad in the Saturday paper for a coach tour to one of the Birmingham concerts. I rang from work on the Monday and the package was £15 each for ticket and coach, including the tickets sent by Registered post. The rearranged date was the last night of the European Tour.

7)      Guitar Town – Steve Earle: I was introduced to Steve Earle hearing Little Rock & Roller on the car radio as I was driving into Leeds. I subsequently bought this album and became a big fan, especially during the 1990s. I first saw Steve & The Dukes at a crowded Leeds Irish Centre. I’m not sure how crowded but apparently there was a Police function in another room and the Irish Centre was closed for a period after this! (I dread to think what they might have found had they searched his dressing room). Eleven months later I saw him solo in the more intimate surrounding of the City Varieties and have seen him a number of times since.

8)      Being There – Martyn Joseph: In 1991 I went to see Beverley Craven at St George’s Hall in Bradford. She had two support acts, the second of which was Martyn. This was not long prior to the release of Being There, his first album on a major label, which I subsequently bought. Four years later I saw him supporting Art Garfunkel at the same venue and have seen him many times over the subsequent years, including one show in a garden shed! In the early 1990s he played most years at Fibbers in York and was always amused by the fact that the stage had a small fence to deter stage invaders, as this wasn’t a regular problem for a guy with a guitar singing songs about redundant miners and prostitutes.

9)      Hourglass – Kate Rusby: I was aware of Kate by reputation but didn’t know her music, however I was interested enough to go and see her at the City Varieties in February 2001. She was fantastic and I ordered both her albums (Hourglass & Sleepless) the next day. The day they arrived I played them over and over. In those early days the shows were either billed as the Kate Rusby Band or the smaller Kate Rusby Trio, although the three times I saw the trio it varied in number from two to four. I still see her as often as possible, although that tends to mainly be her Christmas shows these days. Those with sharp eyes can spot me in the Kate Rusby At Christmas DVD filmed at Harrogate Royal Hall.

10)   Out On My Own – Edwina Hayes: In 2005 I saw Nanci Griffith at York’s Grand Opera House. Prior to the show I noticed the name of the support act on Nanci’s website and, on a whim, Googled it. I found out that Edwina had recently released her debut album, but what interested me was that it was produced by Clive Gregson and had an impressive list of contributors including the likes of Christine Collister and Dennis Locorriere. That prompted me to order the album despite not having heard a note. By the time of the concert I was looking forward to seeing Edwina as much as I was Nanci and took along the CD booket which I got signed. I’ve seen her and met her many times since, including the recording of the unreleased Live In Driffield CD, where she was supported by Chris Helme (formerly of The Seahorses), making him surely the only person to be support act for U2, Oasis, The Rolling Stones and Edwina Hayes. She was the last person I saw live before lockdown, playing a micro brewery in Wetherby for around 30 people. A stripped down version of this album is promised using earlier demos recorded in Nashville.

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9 minutes ago, stillilllife said:

I've never seen that album cover for it.

It might have only been out in the US, I don't know. On Wikipedia it said it was an alternate cover but it's the one I bought. I don't think I've actually seen the other.

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Day 10

I had a roommate who had Let it Be so I was familiar with The Replacements but it was this album that did it for me. This is when Paul really took over how the band sounded and that's what I love about them. Paul Westerberg is my dual musical genius along with Bruce. Between The Replacements and Paul's solo works I probably listen to him more.

Tim, The Replacements

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No 10: Just Jinger - All Comes Round

I started my list with a South African album, and I shall end it with one too. I appreciate that this cover will have little to no impression on most all of you, and thats okay. But I had to include it. In the mid Nineties, in the honeymoon of the then newly democratic South Africa, the South African rock scene saw a blossoming and a new dawn that was absolutely glorious, for a time. There was no inferiority complex around the music (if its from America or England it MUST be better, of course) young, new talented musicians and songwriters with no chip on the shoulder making great music, across many different genres. I was in my twenties, single, and I would go see live music 3 or 4 nights week almost every week. small clubs and venues where the band was sometimes only a few feet from you. Loud, hot, and amazing. These bands and artists were my Sex Pistols, my Springsteen, my Zeppelin, my Dylan.

It all started with this album for me. I heard this song on the radio and as I always did, would get to Music Warehouse as soon as I could to pick up this new album. It was a new band I'd never heard of, Just Jinger. I played that CD over and over and over... I went to see them live, and they were the most magnetic, intense live act I'd ever seen. I saw them as many times as I could and still do when they perform today.

Since then, they have released much better albums and songs, but this one always remains special. It also holds the honour of being the highest selling South African 'rock' album of all time, a feat not ever likely to be surpassed in the modern streaming era.

Just Jinger All Comes Round 2.jpeg

just jinger all comes round anniversary edition 2.jpg

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20 hours ago, ludomichel said:

n°10 shook and shocked me. It felt soooooooo good !

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By anybody's standards, this is one of the greatest and most important records ever made.

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Day 3 (somehow I forgot about this thread...)

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I bought Exile when I was 12 / 13 after watching the documentary 25 x 5 on Norwegian state television in 1989/90, and I have since listened to this album approx. 586 298 times...

It's a tremendous album in its own right - but it also opened up my mind to both country & soul music.

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