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59 minutes ago, bobfan1976 said:

This thread may gain a bit more discussion if you can actually include a clip of the version you're talking about...

I wish I was that tech savy. It's on one of my archive CD'S :D I'm Just counting on you all to be obsessive enough to own it :P

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It's not bad at all, but it's not Stockholm '88. For one thing the band doesn't play as tight. It reminds me of that Irish beer company, I have forgotten the name, that knew their  dry stout could never compete with Guinness so they adopted the slogan "Have a [the name of the beer]] for a change!" This version is nice for a detour and slight different take on the song, but Stockholm '88 is the real thing.

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On 7/1/2020 at 3:21 PM, SoulBoogieAlex said:

That one isn’t bad either. I still prefer Sunrise:ph34r: I like the looseness of it

If this topic is about losseness I prefer the version with Wolfgang Niedecken & Band. Live at Cafe Eckstein, Berlin, 1995

 

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1 hour ago, Paolo's Circus Story said:

32 ;) Otherwise this performance would be younger than me! :lol:

My mistake! Time flies but this performance seems to be forever young.

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2 hours ago, SoulBoogieAlex said:

It must be said though that John Lee had to do very little to make it sound impressive. As much as I love Springsteen’s version, he never managed to take it away from mr. Hooker.

That John Lee Hooker is classic stuff and I had that version in my mind when I first heard Bruce playing it live on the Stockholm radio broadcast. But I later I realized that Springsteen's version has more to do with the Animals, a major influence. Just check the lyrics, especially the added  "shake it baby" in the middle. Musically, as with a lot of traditional blues numbers, The Animals and Springsteen are taking its uptown, speeding it up (rock-blues)

All the Boom Boom's over the years  https://secondhandsongs.com/work/28584/all

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I think you're right @el sergio. I love how Springsteen covered and referenced well over 500 songs in his career. I started a play list years ago and I'm still discovering songs I hadn't realized he did or used. It's a fascinating journey through American music.

https://open.spotify.com/playlist/4qjGmUSD20D5Zg6j1rr4Bj?si=5ItHJ-NNS5KYlzD6eBaWmw

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23 hours ago, SoulBoogieAlex said:

I think you're right @el sergio. I love how Springsteen covered and referenced well over 500 songs in his career. I started a play list years ago and I'm still discovering songs I hadn't realized he did or used. It's a fascinating journey through American music.

https://open.spotify.com/playlist/4qjGmUSD20D5Zg6j1rr4Bj?si=5ItHJ-NNS5KYlzD6eBaWmw

Yes you are right. Wasn't it Bob Dylan who said that "All the songs are boundaries and together they simply made a map, they told a certain generation, a certain pop audience, where it was"

In that regard I am pleasantly shocked by the sheer song selections in Springsteen's SiriuxXM shows. A lot of Lakers will start to hate it when I say this but those FROM HIS HOME TO YOURS show are more valuable than the Archive shows. This is because the Radio shows are open to a much bigger audience than the specialist Archival shows. I have already sent some useful links from the Radio show to some friends who know Springsteen, but are not into live recordings. They are pleasantly shocked ...

Also Bob Dylan hosted his own radio show called "Theme Time Radio Hour" quoting wikipedia: each episode was an eclectic, freeform mix of blues, folk, rockabilly, R&B, soul, bebop, rock-and-roll, country and pop music, centered on a theme such as "Weather," "Money," and "Flowers" with songs from artists as diverse as Patti Page and LL Cool J. Much of the material for the show's 100 episodes was culled from producer Eddie Gorodetsky's music collection, which reportedly includes more than 10,000 records and more than 140,000 digital files

To get back on the Boom Boom topic, here is Rufus Thomas soulful version (it notably featured Donald "Duck" Dunn on bass) which Springsteen certainly might have had heard since he was more into soul than into blues

 

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On 7/2/2020 at 9:21 PM, SoulBoogieAlex said:

I totally forgot that café Eckstein version. That one’s a blast!

I searched for "Bruce Springsteen with Wolfgang Niedecken & Band" and found a bunch of videos I didn't knew of before. :)

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That Sunrise version is indeed superb. A great example of latter day Bruce as a bandleader. Calling out the solos then, off-the-cuff, working out a cool breakdown at the end with the horns. Bruce high energy, spontaneous, young-looking. All of the things that were great about the 2012-2014 tour.

The 2016 version from NYC is pedestrian in comparison, in large part because of how much Bruce had aged in the intervening two years. Much slower, less spontaneous, less engaged. Not having the horns takes something away although, like others, I wasn't a massive fan of everything being turned into a big-band jam because of their presence.

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