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@Rizla @Silvia

one of my very favourite songs off tracks and a highlight of disk 34

 

 

 

Met her at a friendly little bar down along the coast
She said it was her birthday so we had us a nice little toast
Drove around for a while, smoked a few cigarettes
Took her back to my place, she slipped off her party dress
She sat for a while on the edge of the bed just talkin'
Loose change in my pocket
Loose change in my pocket

Pint of gin in my boot cuff, I'm drivin' for a drink and a dance
Sittin' on the next stool, miss a little time on her hands
Yeah I knew she was trouble, but trouble sure was lookin' fine
And when I pulled her close what I knew kinda slipped my mind
We lay in bed and watched the moon come up crawling
Loose change in my pocket
Loose change in my pocket

I pour another drink, wait for the night to get through
Stars are burning in that black void so far away and blue

Now I'm sittin' at a red light I feel somethin' tickin' way down
The night's moving like a slow train crawling through this shithole town
Got my bags packed in the back and I'm tryin' to get going again
But red just goes to green and green goes red and then
Then all I hear's the clock on the dash tick-tocking
Loose change in my pocket
Loose change in my pocket

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Totally agree. Always loved this song, it is a great mood piece. Always loved the line, "Then all I hear's the clock on the dash tick-tocking", which if you are of a certain age, which alot on this forum are, know that the old analog clocks of the cars of the 60' and early 70's had springs and points in them that made that sound when they rewound themselves. 

It often was the only sound you would have in a car with the engine off- while you pondered your screw up or next move, usually with a member of the opposite sex!

Great song. 

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One of my favourites too, along with My Lover Man, off that disc.

Still think if Bruce had put these 2, plus a a combination of the best of Lucky Town and Human Touch on one album, it would have been one of his best.

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6 minutes ago, stillilllife said:

Disk 34...I wish it wasn't a typo.

bugga

its too late to edit

in my defence the board is ultra glitchy

but you are right

imangine even if tracks had been the 8 disks it was ment to be

still, who knows what might hopefully up next for Bruce inc ?

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my favourite line is the night's moving like a slow train through this shit hole train

sums up the crappy little incestuous village i used to work in 

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5 hours ago, mariasbed said:

One of my favourites too, along with My Lover Man, off that disc.

Still think if Bruce had put these 2, plus a a combination of the best of Lucky Town and Human Touch on one album, it would have been one of his best.

 

I love this song and I absolutely agree with that. Human Touch's mistake is the song selection, there Bruce skidded. But are undoubtedly the fantastic songs of that time of the beginning of the 90s.

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I'll repeat what I've written on the other thread. Loose Change is a multilayered gem if doom and gloom is your style.

I treasure all Springsteen's songs where the male protagonist is a rootless, numb, probably dysfunctional man. He meets the most ordinary woman, and you instantly know what's going to happen. Despite acknowledging how meaningless encounters will only provide him with feelings of deep alienation and isolation, he always makes the move. 
On the surface, it appears to be just another song about casual sex, but it is indeed a song about a man who's caught inside his own head. He doesn't possess the strength, or the willingness to get out of that endless cycle. Loose change I think is a metaphor for the void in his life that accompanies him constantly.

No serious fan could ignore the lyrical and thematical connection between Loose Change, The Losing Kind, and Highway 29. And on Western Stars, we can again observe the same guy, an older, more died down version of the same man. 

Musically, the song is interesting, too. It doesn't really go anywhere, it is monotonous,  repetitive. The keyboards are distant, the bass and the vocal put in the center, and on the whole, it doesn't sound like a typical Springsteen song, more like 80s alternative pop.

Dr. Jekyll's work ended on HT/LT, and Mr. Hyde's on Tracks 4? 


 

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7 hours ago, Ibbhomero said:

 

I love this song and I absolutely agree with that. Human Touch's mistake is the song selection, there Bruce skidded. But are undoubtedly the fantastic songs of that time of the beginning of the 90s.

Not just the song selections. The Christic versions of those songs painfully show how he did not figure out how to arrange the properly. The songs were some of the best he had written in his career. Working on a Dream ironically is flawed the other way around, great arrangements but mediocre song writing. I often try to imagine how Human Touch would sound if he had managed to arrange as well as he did the songs on Working.

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17 hours ago, Daisey Jeep said:

@Rizla @Silvia

one of my very favourite songs off tracks and a highlight of disk 4

Excellent choice to put that song back on the radar!

I guess that there is probably a direct link with "Loos Change" and "It's the little things" from the Joad tour 96/96. Just check this intro/outro from 19 mar 1996, King's Hall, Belfast, Northern Ireland:

[Spoken intro:] (Following THE WISH) Ah... it takes a real man to sing about his mother, folks (laughs). Alright. Now let me move on to something a little more familiar. Alright (laughs). Uh... I was in mother's Cadillac (laughs). I got a theme going here tonight. Alright (laughs). I was in my mother's Cadillac and I was going to a friend of mine's house for dinner. Uh, but I was late. So I decided I was gonna practice some newfound maturity and pull over and call him and tell him was gonna be late. But uh, I pulled off this freeway that I can't name — reasons will become obvious — and uh, I pulled into this industrial area. I don't see anything but there's a little bar on the corner. I parked the Cadillac, I go into the bar. I go to ask the bartender where the payphone is, he points in the back. I go in the back, but I only got twenty bucks. So, I go the bar, I say, "Can I have change for twenty, please?" Bartender says, "Well we don't give any change around here." I said, "Oh, you mean uh, you don't, you don't any change in the bar, or, you know, the whole community got together and said like, you know, 'Fuck 'em when they come through here, no more change'?" You know, I don't know. You know. Uh, so a waitress is watching. So she comes up and doesn't say anything, she just goes I guess, she gives me a quarter. I say, "Thank you." I go up, put the money in the payphone. I dial the number, but seems I come just a little bit out of the area code, and it's a fifty-cent call. So, so uh, I hear the waitress and I said, "gee, you know, call costs fifty cents." She says, "Well, that's too bad." Uh, "But," she says, "But if you give me a ride home I'll give you another quarter." (Crowd makes noises) Why? (Laughs) I'll let the song tell the rest. Of course you ought to understand I make all this shit up for pure entertainment purposes anyway (laughs).

She said we could just sleep together, there'd be nothing wrong
We could just hold each other with our clothes on
I went to answer, I don't think we should
Then I heard a voice say, yeah I guess we could
She kissed me lightly, said you know sometimes when you're down
It's the little things that count
It's the little things that count
It's the little things

She said it was too late and I really shouldn't try to drive
She unbuttoned my shirt and whispered just close your eyes
Hey let me take your boots off, you know sometimes when your luck runs out
It's the little things that count
It's the little things that count
It's the little things

Her dress rode lightly as she walked
Then she pulled the covers down

Well I was so dry, she held a water glass to my lips
Yeah she brushed my cheek with her fingertips
She said she had a boyfriend that I reminded her of
His hair was the same muddy brown, she stuck her tongue in my mouth

[Spoken outro:] Yeah always carry that change, that's what I tell you.

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Regarding Tracks, Backstreets.com have some nice liner notes about the stuff on disk 4 (@Promise61, here is Erik again!)

https://www.backstreets.com/Assets/pdfs/BackstreetsLinerNotes.pdf

"Initially during that record, I thought about putting out a record that was basically a bass, a synthesizer, and rhythm, and it created a very austere context for [the] songs to come forth in. I think that happens on "Over The Rise," "When The Lights Go Out," "Loose Change," "Goin' Cali" . . . They were experimental pieces, and they were away from the rock music I was making at the time. Even though it's electric music, it has more to do with "Nebraska." Billboard, NOVEMBER 07, 1998

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2 hours ago, el sergio said:

Excellent choice to put that song back on the radar!

I guess that there is probably a direct link with "Loos Change" and "It's the little things" from the Joad tour 96/96. Just check this intro/outro from 19 mar 1996, King's Hall, Belfast, Northern Ireland:

[Spoken intro:] (Following THE WISH) Ah... it takes a real man to sing about his mother, folks (laughs). Alright. Now let me move on to something a little more familiar. Alright (laughs). Uh... I was in mother's Cadillac (laughs). I got a theme going here tonight. Alright (laughs). I was in my mother's Cadillac and I was going to a friend of mine's house for dinner. Uh, but I was late. So I decided I was gonna practice some newfound maturity and pull over and call him and tell him was gonna be late. But uh, I pulled off this freeway that I can't name — reasons will become obvious — and uh, I pulled into this industrial area. I don't see anything but there's a little bar on the corner. I parked the Cadillac, I go into the bar. I go to ask the bartender where the payphone is, he points in the back. I go in the back, but I only got twenty bucks. So, I go the bar, I say, "Can I have change for twenty, please?" Bartender says, "Well we don't give any change around here." I said, "Oh, you mean uh, you don't, you don't any change in the bar, or, you know, the whole community got together and said like, you know, 'Fuck 'em when they come through here, no more change'?" You know, I don't know. You know. Uh, so a waitress is watching. So she comes up and doesn't say anything, she just goes I guess, she gives me a quarter. I say, "Thank you." I go up, put the money in the payphone. I dial the number, but seems I come just a little bit out of the area code, and it's a fifty-cent call. So, so uh, I hear the waitress and I said, "gee, you know, call costs fifty cents." She says, "Well, that's too bad." Uh, "But," she says, "But if you give me a ride home I'll give you another quarter." (Crowd makes noises) Why? (Laughs) I'll let the song tell the rest. Of course you ought to understand I make all this shit up for pure entertainment purposes anyway (laughs).

She said we could just sleep together, there'd be nothing wrong
We could just hold each other with our clothes on
I went to answer, I don't think we should
Then I heard a voice say, yeah I guess we could
She kissed me lightly, said you know sometimes when you're down
It's the little things that count
It's the little things that count
It's the little things

She said it was too late and I really shouldn't try to drive
She unbuttoned my shirt and whispered just close your eyes
Hey let me take your boots off, you know sometimes when your luck runs out
It's the little things that count
It's the little things that count
It's the little things

Her dress rode lightly as she walked
Then she pulled the covers down

Well I was so dry, she held a water glass to my lips
Yeah she brushed my cheek with her fingertips
She said she had a boyfriend that I reminded her of
His hair was the same muddy brown, she stuck her tongue in my mouth

[Spoken outro:] Yeah always carry that change, that's what I tell you.

i love its the little things that count, its my favourite outake tied with fade to black

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10 hours ago, el sergio said:

Excellent choice to put that song back on the radar!

I guess that there is probably a direct link with "Loos Change" and "It's the little things" from the Joad tour 96/96. Just check this intro/outro from 19 mar 1996, King's Hall, Belfast, Northern Ireland:

[Spoken intro:] (Following THE WISH) Ah... it takes a real man to sing about his mother, folks (laughs). Alright. Now let me move on to something a little more familiar. Alright (laughs). Uh... I was in mother's Cadillac (laughs). I got a theme going here tonight. Alright (laughs). I was in my mother's Cadillac and I was going to a friend of mine's house for dinner. Uh, but I was late. So I decided I was gonna practice some newfound maturity and pull over and call him and tell him was gonna be late. But uh, I pulled off this freeway that I can't name — reasons will become obvious — and uh, I pulled into this industrial area. I don't see anything but there's a little bar on the corner. I parked the Cadillac, I go into the bar. I go to ask the bartender where the payphone is, he points in the back. I go in the back, but I only got twenty bucks. So, I go the bar, I say, "Can I have change for twenty, please?" Bartender says, "Well we don't give any change around here." I said, "Oh, you mean uh, you don't, you don't any change in the bar, or, you know, the whole community got together and said like, you know, 'Fuck 'em when they come through here, no more change'?" You know, I don't know. You know. Uh, so a waitress is watching. So she comes up and doesn't say anything, she just goes I guess, she gives me a quarter. I say, "Thank you." I go up, put the money in the payphone. I dial the number, but seems I come just a little bit out of the area code, and it's a fifty-cent call. So, so uh, I hear the waitress and I said, "gee, you know, call costs fifty cents." She says, "Well, that's too bad." Uh, "But," she says, "But if you give me a ride home I'll give you another quarter." (Crowd makes noises) Why? (Laughs) I'll let the song tell the rest. Of course you ought to understand I make all this shit up for pure entertainment purposes anyway (laughs).

She said we could just sleep together, there'd be nothing wrong
We could just hold each other with our clothes on
I went to answer, I don't think we should
Then I heard a voice say, yeah I guess we could
She kissed me lightly, said you know sometimes when you're down
It's the little things that count
It's the little things that count
It's the little things

She said it was too late and I really shouldn't try to drive
She unbuttoned my shirt and whispered just close your eyes
Hey let me take your boots off, you know sometimes when your luck runs out
It's the little things that count
It's the little things that count
It's the little things

Her dress rode lightly as she walked
Then she pulled the covers down

Well I was so dry, she held a water glass to my lips
Yeah she brushed my cheek with her fingertips
She said she had a boyfriend that I reminded her of
His hair was the same muddy brown, she stuck her tongue in my mouth

[Spoken outro:] Yeah always carry that change, that's what I tell you.

This is probably the into I love the most...

This song is also in 'my category'. :)

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These songs.... they often leave me wondering about how much of the content is autobiographical...

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2 hours ago, Silvia said:

These songs.... they often leave me wondering about how much of the content is autobiographical...

Quite a bit, I suspect - but only scraps.  I think that like most writers he uses snatches of overheard conversations, things he's observed and incidents he's read about.  Then stitches them together with thoughts, emotions and moments from his own life, like a patchwork quilt, to make a story.

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5 hours ago, Silvia said:

These songs.... they often leave me wondering about how much of the content is autobiographical...

I think all of it is autobiographical, while at the same time being a complete fabrication. There is truth, deep truth in fiction. What isn't a fabrication is the lonlieness at the heart of all the behavior, The people in the songs act out in violent ways to express the lonlieness and isolation at the heart of it. The song that comes to mind to me is "Nebraska". I love his introduction of it in Kansas City in 1984. How isolation can lead to explosions of violence. I myself have always related my own issues to this music. I have a memory of the great Woody Allen film where it is said that art creates a working through process for the viewer or listener.

In the end what is real or imagined isnt the point. the point is what we feel, more importantly, its what the writer felt that lead him to that moment of creation.

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On 8/26/2020 at 11:03 AM, Silvia said:

These songs.... they often leave me wondering about how much of the content is autobiographical...

Erm, have you read the liner notes about the stuff on disk 4 of Tracks? https://www.backstreets.com/Assets/pdfs/BackstreetsLinerNotes.pdf

The detailed history from those notes will give you a good insight

For example, HISTORY Goin’ Cali: "In 1992, Springsteen talked to Rolling Stone about his move to Los Angeles: “I’ve always felt a little lighter out here. I’ve had a house in the Hollywood Hills since the early ’80s, and I’d come out here three, four months out of the year. I always remember feeling just a little lighter, like I was carrying less.” One year earlier, he had captured that feeling in this story of moving out west, where the narrator arrives and finds a bar: “Bartender said ‘Hey, how’s it hangin’, tiger?’/He had a shot of tequila, smiled and whispered ‘lighter’.” While the driving bass line brings to mind “57 Channels,” the song is clearly more personal, talking of his parents making the same trip to California in 1969, and of finding peace in a new place with a new family. If there were any doubt, Springsteen has said that the song is indeed autobiographical."

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On 8/25/2020 at 6:50 PM, Silvia said:

I'll repeat what I've written on the other thread. Loose Change is a multilayered gem if doom and gloom is your style.

I treasure all Springsteen's songs where the male protagonist is a rootless, numb, probably dysfunctional man. He meets the most ordinary woman, and you instantly know what's going to happen. Despite acknowledging how meaningless encounters will only provide him with feelings of deep alienation and isolation, he always makes the move. 
On the surface, it appears to be just another song about casual sex, but it is indeed a song about a man who's caught inside his own head. He doesn't possess the strength, or the willingness to get out of that endless cycle. Loose change I think is a metaphor for the void in his life that accompanies him constantly.

No serious fan could ignore the lyrical and thematical connection between Loose Change, The Losing Kind, and Highway 29. And on Western Stars, we can again observe the same guy, an older, more died down version of the same man. 

Musically, the song is interesting, too. It doesn't really go anywhere, it is monotonous,  repetitive. The keyboards are distant, the bass and the vocal put in the center, and on the whole, it doesn't sound like a typical Springsteen song, more like 80s alternative pop.

Dr. Jekyll's work ended on HT/LT, and Mr. Hyde's on Tracks 4? 


 

Well put. The protagonist of Loose Change could also be an older version of the guy in Lucky Man. The guy in LM would have driven out of town when the light turned green, but by LC he's burned out and is just unable to move on for whatever reason.

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Not just my favorite song off "Tracks" Disc 4 (which IMO is criminally underrated in its entirety), but also one of my all-time favorite Springsteen songs in general. "Loose Change" also keeps reminding me of my late mother who, upon hearing it for the first time, dryly noted that "this guy sounds like his belly's aching". :D

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37 minutes ago, Peter said:

Not just my favorite song off "Tracks" Disc 4 (which IMO is criminally underrated in its entirety), but also one of my all-time favorite Springsteen songs in general. "Loose Change" also keeps reminding me of my late mother who, upon hearing it for the first time, dryly noted that "this guy sounds like his belly's aching". :D

Funny how human brain works, and how a brief comment can stay with you forever.

This song has never been played live, according to Brucebase, which is a shame. 

Sign next time, anyone?

 

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