Jump to content
Greasy Lake Community

The Official Letter to You album and documentary thread


Recommended Posts

5 hours ago, MacBruce said:

Song for Orphans; Always been a brilliant song, and this is just magical. Hugely influenced by Dylan as he was way back then. Incredible wordplay. Melody perhaps a bit too similar to Dylan's My Back Pages, but we'll let him off with that.

 

Yes, exactly this. I’m glad someone else hears it. I was thinking that Dylan would not be pleased to hear this song. That said, it’s lyrically great and I love it.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 541
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

What I like the most about this album is that there is something for everyone on it. Depending on what era you prefer, what style of song you prefer, whether you like acoustic Bruce, rock Bruce, pop B

Received from a friend by WhatsApp 

Sometimes an album will come along and its release is coincidentally timed with an event, either personally or on a larger scale, of significant importance. And it becomes a musical time capsule of th

Posted Images

I love this album!  The film is a must watch, it really defines the entire album and got pretty emotional for me at times thanks to Bruce's thoughts/narration in the film.  I think it's the most personal album he's ever done. I feel like it was divine intervention that came down and inspired Bruce to make this album on the fly with the band before all hell broke lose around the world with the virus.  Watching the film and seeing them all together, able to hug, play and drink together is kind of sad and joyful at the same time, since we're not suppose have much human interaction this year, and probably next one too.  I feel very lucky to have grown old with Bruce's music and this album pretty much sums it all up.

The 3 songs from the 70s are so great because you see the difference in his writing back then and what it's been like for the past 30 years or so.  

A huge thanks to Bruce & E Street for one of the few bright spots in this year from hell.  I need to be able to buy this film!!

  • Like 4
  • Love Love Love! 2
  • Bruuuuce! 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Jertucky said:

Right, he said he started it during Bush’s time in office then couldn’t finish it until Trump got in office. I don’t want to turn this into a political discussion, just pointing out that if you could take a step back from your (not you specifically but the generic your) political leanings you could see how it could apply to members of either party.

 

To be honest, (if you’re referring to the ´Corriere Della Sera’ interview I posted a few days ago) what Bruce said is that ‘Rainmaker’ dates back to the Bush era. The song is likely a ´Magic’ outtake (and it would have fit that album perfectly, IMHO, had Bruce wanted a more political album in 2007). What makes it peculiar on this album, is Bruce’s slightly younger voice, and the different recording room reverb (plus a higher complexity in the song arrangement. There’re some ‘Into the Fire’ similarities that are quite revealing in this respect). But it’s not that he couldn’t finish it the because a Democrat was in office. Then of course one can apply the lyrics to the leader they want.

Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, timeisillusion said:

Most certainly we can all be in 100% agreement on this!

With that percentage, we can only agree that it is the best E STREET album since Western Stars. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, G-Man said:

Rainmaker is brilliant.  My favorite song on an album of highlights.

Rainmaker is definitely a grower. I guess it "suffers" in the first listenings because it's the only "challenging" song in an otherwise extremely straightforward and homogeneous sounding album. So, I can see why many people find it out of context on LTY.

But I agree it's a brilliant song. l really like the Magic album, but I think the inclusion of Rainmaker  would have improved the album, regardless of its thematic redundancy with the 2007 title track. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, MacBruce said:

Song for Orphans; Always been a brilliant song, and this is just magical. Hugely influenced by Dylan as he was way back then. Incredible wordplay. Melody perhaps a bit too similar to Dylan's My Back Pages, but we'll let him off with that.

I started singing the 'I was so much older then' bit at some stages.  I got Kate to put The Byrds' version (always preferred their renditions) on Youtube to show her why.

 

Quote

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

There have been a few discussions on here about I'm On Fire being a bit of a creepy song (I don't agree, but still ...). Well, y'all can forget about that one now. Janey NAS has got to be the creepiest song he's ever written, eh? And I love it. I can see a film being made with this as the soundtrack.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, doesthisbusstop said:

Well Jimmy, you did ask....

 

EF854DAA-037E-47C3-97B6-E0F122D06CD8.jpeg

Nice glass, although I'd would have preferred to read a surname like Nicky's not so close to my lips... ;)

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Turns out Bruce Springsteen wears a super cool Heuer Autavia ref. 1163, and on a bund strap no less. As spotted by the watch journalist Nick Gould, who goes by @niccoloy on Instagram, the Boss can be seen in the above photo rocking the classic C-shaped chronograph in a photo from the forthcoming Apple TV+ documentary, Bruce Springsteen's Letter To You

https://www.hodinkee.com/articles/bruce-springsteen-wearing-a-vintage-heuer-autavia

boss-hero-3.thumb.jpg.a4a1f7fbd590c422231b8d385b237d81.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

https://eu.usatoday.com/story/entertainment/music/2020/10/21/bruce-springsteen-letter-you-interview-e-street-band/6002935002/ (Retweeted by David Sancious)

Behind the scenes, well, a rock ’n’ roll band is a rock ’n’ roll band – especially one that was formed in the early ’70s.       

“No, there was drama like that,” Springsteen said with a chuckle.  “We did not have clean living people.”

But band members did abide by a “code.”

“We had people who were into what other rock musicians had gotten into and who got themselves in trouble with it on more than one occasion and this happened with more than one member,” Springsteen said. “So our general approach was to assist them and get them help as quickly as we possibly could, and I can say that worked out. We looked out for one another in that sense. If someone was doing bad you may get a phone call, ‘Hey, I saw …, he didn’t look so good.’ Maybe I better call him up. I call him up, 'You don’t sound so good,' and one thing would lead to another and people would go into rehab and they would do what they had to do.

“But it was a group that looked out for the other guy a little closer than some other groups and so consequently, the guys who needed help, they got the help. And for the most part, I know the band certainly over the past 10, 20 years has been pretty sober, a lot of it for the most part. We were not free of the difficulties or troubles that other bands had, but we managed to treat them in a way that worked for the good of the band and for the good of that individual. So that was a very powerful and positive thing to do.”

“The recklessness and carelessness that you see from the current administration toward life itself is a disgrace. It’s a true disgrace and it’s very insulting to all those who have gotten sick and who have passed away. It’s a very sad state of affairs because really your job is to comfort those people. Comfort your citizens, comfort your neighbors, comfort your friends. Let them know those who died are irreplaceable. Let them know the nation is weeping for them and that the nation cares about them from the top down. Then do your best to solve the thing as well as you can. But that’s been missing. That’s a voice that’s been missing and the voice of the value of life is missing from our daily political discourse. So it’s been very sad and I suppose it is something that gets addressed in our record and maybe some folks will find it comforting.”

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Eileen said:

I started singing the 'I was so much older then' bit at some stages.  I got Kate to put The Byrds' version (always preferred their renditions) on Youtube to show her why.

 

 

There's almost a part where that line fits the melody of My Back Pages, but Bruce sings it in a lower register. Obviously very similar harmonica work, and lyrically, to Dylan's mid-sixties stuff, but Dylan never rocked in this way. It's a brilliant song. I love it.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, Promise61 said:

What is very interesting is that the producer Ron Aleoli has virtually no contribution to this film. Whatsoever. In image only.  

I'm thinking that he's toast.

Better ask questions before you shoot, the original score of the documentary is "composed" and "produced" by Bruce Springsteen with Ron Aniello

310302782_OrginalscorecomposedbyBruceSpringsteenandRonAniello.thumb.PNG.fe95c370d4811b5e1e2df90d6ed670c1.PNG

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Eileen said:

Hot? I just saw a man singing to me with all the (s)adness in his soul.

Im in no position to say no to a little eye candy when its on offer ;)

Gotta brighten the day somehow

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

This probably has been mentioned already, but the final line ''I'll See You In My Dreams' is such a beautiful way to end the album. Dropping the band out just having Bruce and the piano; pure soul and raw emotion pouring through the speakers. A fitting end to an album which echoes these feelings throughout.

  • Like 2
  • Love Love Love! 1
  • Bruuuuce! 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

More I listen the album more I think One minute you're here / Letter To You / Burnin' Train / Janey could be played at the beginning of the nexts shows. They are so intense and for me I love when Bruce begin a show with a calm song. 

When I saw him in Paris in 2016 and when the band start the show with Iceman / Lucky Town remember me a lot of the debut of this album. 

  • Like 2
  • Bruuuuce! 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

My cd arrived today and I've had my first listen (on headphones) and not read everyone's opinion yet.

Does everyone else hear the guitar opening to "Jole Blon" redeployed in "I'll See You in My Dream"? I was glad of that little touch.

Also, I wanted the band outro to "Ghosts" to go on for longer.

First impression: at a time when I'm remembering lost loved ones, it was quite a challenging listen at times. I'll be ready for this when I listen again.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, el sergio said:

Better ask questions before you shoot, the original score of the documentary is "composed" and "produced" by Bruce Springsteen with Ron Aniello

310302782_OrginalscorecomposedbyBruceSpringsteenandRonAniello.thumb.PNG.fe95c370d4811b5e1e2df90d6ed670c1.PNG

Aye. I know all that, that's how I spotted the typo. My point was that he has no contribution in the film.

Link to post
Share on other sites
24 minutes ago, richevs said:

Good solid E street album.

However The House of a Thousand Guitars is so bad I'm wondering whether the footage of Landau sobbing was actually filmed after Bruce played that track back to him for the first time.

Best song on the album in my opinion...just as well we don't all think the same.

That's what makes his albums so special, we all have our own personal favourites.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...