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FYC: amazing band playing some good songs with great attitude before rounding off with a song which reminds us that the greatest songs doesn't need a band. 

  1. Man's Job
  2. Human Touch
  3. Lucky Town
  4. I Wish I Were Blind
  5. Thunder Road


 

 

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From Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band Live/1975–1985
1.    "This Land Is Your Land" December 28, 1980, Nassau Coliseum, Uniondale, New York
2.    "Nebraska" August 6, 1984, Meadowlands Arena, East Rutherford, New Jersey    
3.    "Johnny 99" August 19, 1985, Giants Stadium, East Rutherford, New Jersey    
4.    "Reason to Believe" August 19, 1984, Meadowlands Arena, East Rutherford, New Jersey    
5.    "Born in the U.S.A." September 30, 1985, Los Angeles Coliseum

From Dave Marsh, BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN TWO HEARTS, THE DEFINITIVE BIOGRAPHY, 1972–2003
For its first five sides, then, Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band Live/1975–1985 defines a dream and chronicles its dissolution and the ways that dawning realizations transform the dreamer. Its final four are concerned with how you live with what’s left. The transition is expressed on Side Six, which runs from “This Land Is Your Land” to “Reason to Believe,” a leap every bit as long as it looks. Introducing Woody Guthrie’s greatest hit, Springsteen acknowledges that Guthrie wrote in anger, but when Bruce sings the song it’s about dreams and visions. What’s emphasized isn’t the grandeur of the landscapes or the mockery society makes of them, it’s the voices that call out at the end of each verse, promising something better.

“Nebraska” and “Johnny 99” are songs about people who cannot hear those voices, the consequence of which is a death sentence. But “Reason to Believe” is something worse: a requiem for those who have heard the voices, pursued them to the end, and then discovered that they were lying. It’s about the greatest menace that lurks in the darkness on the edge of town, about the compulsion to leap into the river and be swept downstream, about the temptation to run and keep on running, not toward freedom but away from the facts. Springsteen defines the song precisely: “That was the bottom.” “But at the end of Nebraska—it’s kind of ironic—I wrote another song with the word born in it, which is really weird,” Springsteen observed. “And from that point on, the answer to ‘Reason to Believe’ was ‘Born in the U.S.A.’—I guess either record, but particularly the live version. That’s the answer to it. That’s the only answer that I can perceive. And that connects back to ‘Badlands,’ you know. And that was the moment that I felt I’d gotten things in a little healthier perspective, and that I stopped—I didn’t stop using my job; I stopped abusing my job, which I felt part of me had been doing. In the end, I just understood a lot more about what it takes to get by. “No, it ain’t gonna save you; you gotta save yourself. And you’re gonna need a lotta help.”

The rest of the record — and, it is not entirely unreasonable to imagine, the rest of Bruce Springsteen’s work — is about giving that help and, just as important, receiving it. It begins with “Born in the U.S.A.,” with that singer “born down in a dead man’s town,” but at the end, standing in the shadows of a prison, the singer has made a choice: He will run, and keep on running, but he will never fail to look back. He will always remember what’s been done to him— and his friend at Khe Sanh, that woman he loved in Saigon, and the Viet Cong — and those memories will shape his future, no matter where it leads. In order to be “a cool rockin’ daddy in the U.S.A.,” you have to go beyond hearing the voices Woody Guthrie wrote about; you have to try to answer them back — you have to join them.

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2 minutes ago, el sergio said:

From Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band Live/1975–1985
1.    "This Land Is Your Land" December 28, 1980, Nassau Coliseum, Uniondale, New York
2.    "Nebraska" August 6, 1984, Meadowlands Arena, East Rutherford, New Jersey    
3.    "Johnny 99" August 19, 1985, Giants Stadium, East Rutherford, New Jersey    
4.    "Reason to Believe" August 19, 1984, Meadowlands Arena, East Rutherford, New Jersey    
5.    "Born in the U.S.A." September 30, 1985, Los Angeles Coliseum

From Dave Marsh, BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN TWO HEARTS, THE DEFINITIVE BIOGRAPHY, 1972–2003
For its first five sides, then, Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band Live/1975–1985 defines a dream and chronicles its dissolution and the ways that dawning realizations transform the dreamer. Its final four are concerned with how you live with what’s left. The transition is expressed on Side Six, which runs from “This Land Is Your Land” to “Reason to Believe,” a leap every bit as long as it looks. Introducing Woody Guthrie’s greatest hit, Springsteen acknowledges that Guthrie wrote in anger, but when Bruce sings the song it’s about dreams and visions. What’s emphasized isn’t the grandeur of the landscapes or the mockery society makes of them, it’s the voices that call out at the end of each verse, promising something better.

“Nebraska” and “Johnny 99” are songs about people who cannot hear those voices, the consequence of which is a death sentence. But “Reason to Believe” is something worse: a requiem for those who have heard the voices, pursued them to the end, and then discovered that they were lying. It’s about the greatest menace that lurks in the darkness on the edge of town, about the compulsion to leap into the river and be swept downstream, about the temptation to run and keep on running, not toward freedom but away from the facts. Springsteen defines the song precisely: “That was the bottom.” “But at the end of Nebraska—it’s kind of ironic—I wrote another song with the word born in it, which is really weird,” Springsteen observed. “And from that point on, the answer to ‘Reason to Believe’ was ‘Born in the U.S.A.’—I guess either record, but particularly the live version. That’s the answer to it. That’s the only answer that I can perceive. And that connects back to ‘Badlands,’ you know. And that was the moment that I felt I’d gotten things in a little healthier perspective, and that I stopped—I didn’t stop using my job; I stopped abusing my job, which I felt part of me had been doing. In the end, I just understood a lot more about what it takes to get by. “No, it ain’t gonna save you; you gotta save yourself. And you’re gonna need a lotta help.”

The rest of the record — and, it is not entirely unreasonable to imagine, the rest of Bruce Springsteen’s work — is about giving that help and, just as important, receiving it. It begins with “Born in the U.S.A.,” with that singer “born down in a dead man’s town,” but at the end, standing in the shadows of a prison, the singer has made a choice: He will run, and keep on running, but he will never fail to look back. He will always remember what’s been done to him— and his friend at Khe Sanh, that woman he loved in Saigon, and the Viet Cong — and those memories will shape his future, no matter where it leads. In order to be “a cool rockin’ daddy in the U.S.A.,” you have to go beyond hearing the voices Woody Guthrie wrote about; you have to try to answer them back — you have to join them.

Amazing post! My favorite movie of all time is STAR WARS episode III: Revenge of the sith just because of those reasons. Never imagined that the box-set actually had a dramaturgy... 
 

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On 4/15/2021 at 3:49 PM, Promise61 said:

Side four of The River is pretty much the best side of any of Bruce's vinyl. Ramrod, Price, Drive, Wreck. I know I'm cheating by only picking four.

Just add Stolen Car!

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On 4/15/2021 at 8:38 AM, Jertucky said:

I would with that as long as it excludes Meeting Across the River, which sadly eliminates Jungleland. So I guess I’ll go:

Thunder Road

10th Ave.

Night

Backstreets

Born to Run

 

 

 

For me  MATR is one of my all time favorite Bruce songs.  Love the story it tells. 

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15 hours ago, 65pacecar said:

For me  MATR is one of my all time favorite Bruce songs.  Love the story it tells. 

It’s a good story. It kills the flow of that album for me though. Just doesn’t fit. But if you like it, listen to the hell out of it.

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