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"You're a Friend of Mine"


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The infectious, upbeat song, co-written by Michael Narada Walden and Jeffrey Cohen, was included on Clemons’ 1985 album Hero and was the highest-charting single ever by an E Street Band member, rising to No. 18 on Billboard’s singles chart. Bruce Springsteen has never sung it in public excerpt at Clemons’ 2011 funeral, at which he, Browne and surviving members of the E Street Band performed it. There have been many different versions of it, over the years. Here are videos of some of them, in chronological order:

Clarence Clemons and Jackson Browne's 'You're a Friend of Mine,' from 1985 to 2020 - NJArts.netNJArts.net

 

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7 hours ago, JustDan said:

Never seen this one before...Wonder who wrote it...Kinda cheesy...(just IMO)

 

Havn't seen this evil little fucker for a while :angry:

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7 hours ago, Born To Walk said:

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Its kinda sad none of the ESB members ever really made big hits and became well none back in the day

I mean i guess (some) people know Steve and Clarence and Nils

What's that about the whole is greater than the sum of the parts parts 

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On 6/17/2021 at 11:18 AM, Promise61 said:

It's not a bad little pop song, but the album it comes from is dire.

Agreed 100%. And the video is downright embarrassing, even for mid-1980s standards. As an aside, I seem to remember a story from around that time about Clarence wanting to appear in a Pepsi TV commercial, which Bruce didn't allow.

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5 hours ago, Peter said:

Agreed 100%. And the video is downright embarrassing, even for mid-1980s standards. As an aside, I seem to remember a story from around that time about Clarence wanting to appear in a Pepsi TV commercial, which Bruce didn't allow.

Interesting trivia. I did not know that.

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19 hours ago, Promise61 said:

Interesting trivia. I did not know that.

Diet Coke it was, not Pepsi - my bad. This "Pittsburgh Quarterly" online article (from 2006) is well worth a read in its entirety, but scroll down to the "Stay loyal to the brand" section for full details on what happened in regards to that commercial:

https://pittsburghquarterly.com/articles/springsteen-inc/

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6 hours ago, Peter said:

Diet Coke it was, not Pepsi - my bad. This "Pittsburgh Quarterly" online article (from 2006) is well worth a read in its entirety, but scroll down to the "Stay loyal to the brand" section for full details on what happened in regards to that commercial:

https://pittsburghquarterly.com/articles/springsteen-inc/

Fascinating stuff. Tnx.

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22 minutes ago, Promise61 said:

Fascinating stuff. Tnx.

Paul and @Eileen, there are some write ups on BTX by Mike Saunders about the '81 European tour. You might have read them in the past but thought you might like to know. They're on the front page today.

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2 minutes ago, janeymarywendy said:

Paul and @Eileen, there are some write ups on BTX by Mike Saunders about the '81 European tour. You might have read them in the past but thought you might like to know. They're on the front page today.

He puts them on Facebook, too. Thanks for thinking of us! x

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The Martin Kahan-directed video for “A Woman’s Got The Power” (the A-side of the “Summer On Signal Hill” single) features a brief, non-speaking cameo appearance by Springsteen (as a car wash attendant!!!). The video was filmed in early autumn 1983 and first released in February 1984.

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12 hours ago, el sergio said:

The Martin Kahan-directed video for “A Woman’s Got The Power” (the A-side of the “Summer On Signal Hill” single) features a brief, non-speaking cameo appearance by Springsteen (as a car wash attendant!!!). The video was filmed in early autumn 1983 and first released in February 1984.

tumblr_myh60c22ZY1sjocaao1_1280.thumb.jpg.2c97311f945f13ba49a9b2d5819c65d1.jpg

 

It was the public's first glimpse of Muscular Bruce.

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On 6/25/2021 at 9:09 AM, Promise61 said:

It was the public's first glimpse of Muscular Bruce.

The Backstreet news is now featuring a four part story about The River tour Europe 1981. The start of this tour was reshudeled due to exhaustion/illness. And we hear that during the summer 1981 US tour after that some resheduling had taken place once again due to "ill health". That health story is further corrobated by the July 1981 Archive Show where the general pace of the songs was slowed.

"In 1983 Bruce had begun attending a gym in Red Bank owned by physical therapist Phil Dunphy. Although Bruce claimed he’d “never exercised before in my whole life,” he had always done a few things (notably, surfing) which kept him in decent physical condition. He’d never have made it through his own sweat-soaked concert marathons otherwise. On the other hand, the lingering effects of the leg injury from his high school motorcycle accident kept him limping and required frequent treatment, particularly after he was reinjured in a three-wheeler accident in 1979.

Springsteen had always been an extremely physical person; one of the things that “Dancing in the Dark” captures is how repressed he felt while sitting on his ass in a recording studio. So it made sense that he responded avidly to Dunphy’s fitness regimen. Soon Bruce was doing strength and weight training and running six miles a day. He also radically altered his eating habits. (“All I knew was fast, fast food. That’s all I had the dough for.”) The result was a measurable increase in stamina as well as physique and a degree of dedication that included bringing Dunphy on the road as his personal trainer. As Bruce later told Chet Flippo. “It’s really helped on the road. Before, I would come out the first night, and I’d almost die, wanna throw up, gaspin’ for air.” He was giddy and dizzy by the middle of that first night’s set, but that was from the surge of adrenaline and the accelerated pace the band took in its initial excitement"  Bruce Springsteen Two Hearts, the Story, Dave Marsh

 

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10 hours ago, el sergio said:

The Backstreet news is now featuring a four part story about The River tour Europe 1981. The start of this tour was reshudeled due to exhaustion/illness. And we hear that during the summer 1981 US tour after that some resheduling had taken place once again due to "ill health". That health story is further corrobated by the July 1981 Archive Show where the general pace of the songs was slowed.

"In 1983 Bruce had begun attending a gym in Red Bank owned by physical therapist Phil Dunphy. Although Bruce claimed he’d “never exercised before in my whole life,” he had always done a few things (notably, surfing) which kept him in decent physical condition. He’d never have made it through his own sweat-soaked concert marathons otherwise. On the other hand, the lingering effects of the leg injury from his high school motorcycle accident kept him limping and required frequent treatment, particularly after he was reinjured in a three-wheeler accident in 1979.

Springsteen had always been an extremely physical person; one of the things that “Dancing in the Dark” captures is how repressed he felt while sitting on his ass in a recording studio. So it made sense that he responded avidly to Dunphy’s fitness regimen. Soon Bruce was doing strength and weight training and running six miles a day. He also radically altered his eating habits. (“All I knew was fast, fast food. That’s all I had the dough for.”) The result was a measurable increase in stamina as well as physique and a degree of dedication that included bringing Dunphy on the road as his personal trainer. As Bruce later told Chet Flippo. “It’s really helped on the road. Before, I would come out the first night, and I’d almost die, wanna throw up, gaspin’ for air.” He was giddy and dizzy by the middle of that first night’s set, but that was from the surge of adrenaline and the accelerated pace the band took in its initial excitement"  Bruce Springsteen Two Hearts, the Story, Dave Marsh

 

This extract brings us back, again, to the Sandford book where he asserts that Bruce only got into body building because a college guy named Jim Cobanis beat him up because Bruce stole his girlfriend.

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On 6/27/2021 at 8:00 AM, Promise61 said:

This extract brings us back, again, to the Sandford book where he asserts that Bruce only got into body building because a college guy named Jim Cobanis beat him up because Bruce stole his girlfriend.

Well If you are in for sleazy stories about Springsteen you better read (again) the Marc Eliot / Mike Apple book "Down Thunder Road: The Making of Bruce Springsteen" where the bombshell in that book is that Springsteen (then considered as the worst driver in the band) caused an accident with someone seriously hurt during the 1973 tour.

The story in the Marsh book about Bruce attending gym and changin eating habits in 1983 sounds very inspiring, especially in the light of the current pandemic situation and also because Springsteen physical health up until now has been seen as one of his blessings  So I greatly dismiss that Jim Cobanis pumping iron gossip story

jmarchese_bs3_master.thumb.jpg.0ccbe669395f7b185265376976e4afa9.jpg

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1 hour ago, el sergio said:

Well If you are in for sleazy stories about Springsteen you better read (again) the Marc Eliot / Mike Apple book "Down Thunder Road: The Making of Bruce Springsteen" where the bombshell in that book is that Springsteen (then considered as the worst driver in the band) caused an accident with someone seriously hurt during the 1973 tour.

The story in the Marsh book about Bruce attending gym and changin eating habits in 1983 sounds very inspiring, especially in the light of the current pandemic situation and also because Springsteen physical health up until now has been seen as one of his blessings  So I greatly dismiss that Jim Cobanis pumping iron gossip story

jmarchese_bs3_master.thumb.jpg.0ccbe669395f7b185265376976e4afa9.jpg

Here we go again, Bruce as saint.

The Cobanis story was never challenged or retracted. It stands as a true story. Maybe insignificant to many, but if true it does play in to Bruce's ego.

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Here we go again, the old guard who still want back their own classic Springsteen from the 70/80's. Bruce as saint. No fucking way man, just read the remarks from Mike Appel interview with Time of Israel in 2016, there are still so much sleazy things about Springsteen we still do not know:

Times: Jon Landau loves him with absolute devotion?

Mike Appel: (Laughs.) You’d have to ask Jon that. Jon had a lot of success. But I think he deserved it. It’s not easy working with Bruce. (Landau) soldiered through an awful lot of difficult times and all sorts of problems that arose that are not publicly known. He managed to get through all that and come out on top. My hat’s off to him. The guy’s not some wussy guy. The guy’s a hard-working guy. He’s in it for the long run. He didn’t give up. He told me some stories which I knew Bruce was certainly capable of. Oh boy. Oh boy, Jon, you had your hands full. My hat’s off to you. I really have good feelings about Jon. He put in all the time. Look at how long he’s been there, for God’s sake.

Bruce as saint: that was exactly the point the incrowd tried to play down the Marsh biography (although that book was not without it flaws). But as Brian Hiatt explained in his Backstreets interview 2 years ago that the Marsh biography was still a big inspiration

Backstreets: Thinking of the interviews you did, there's a line from one that's really powerful. In 2010 he told you that when he is "on stage with all those people out there, the abyss is under my heels, and I always feel it back there." The abyss. That's heavy.

Brian Hiatt: Yeah, that was from my interview for Darkness. I used that in the Nebraska chapter. We were really skirting, really edging towards a discussion of depression without coming out and saying it; this was before he had gotten explicit about it. Although in Glory Days, Dave Marsh used the word depression — so again, these things are often hiding in plain sight.

 

Backstreets: It's not all inside baseball. And, in fact, the way you go about it, there's a clear narrative throughout the book. It's the story of Bruce and the band, told via the songbook. And by doing it chronologically, it's a story that you can put up against something like his memoir. Bruce talked about Tracks as an alternate roadmap for his career. And in a way, this is an alternate roadmap for his biography — through his work.

Brian Hiatt: You certainly get a narrative. Hopefully it's a companion to a book like... well, the book of your choice, whether Born to Run or Peter Carlin or Dave Marsh. I think, and I hope, that it works alongside them.

There you got it: most of the other biographies doesn't matter any more today. Is the Cobanis story you keep nailing on the only significant thing that happened in the last 40 years? Springsteen is now in his 70's, leave him alone now!

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2 hours ago, el sergio said:

 Is the Cobanis story you keep nailing on the only significant thing that happened in the last 40 years? 

Heck no. Promise has, at least, another 3 stories that he trots out from time to time.  Canoegate, Lynn G, guitar bloke. :)

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1 hour ago, Eileen said:

Heck no. Promise has, at least, another 3 stories that he trots out from time to time.  Canoegate, Lynn G, guitar bloke. :)

 His eventual confession to having mental illness explains a lot in retrospect.

His comment at the beginning of the WS concert, to paraphrase,  "If I loved you I would hurt you. And I still struggle with that today" I think is not only brutally honest but pretty devastating, too.

As you say, I don't mind repeating the dark days stories that are already in print.    :-)

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