Jump to content
Greasy Lake Community

Jessica going to the Olympics


Recommended Posts

2 hours ago, Daisey Jeep said:

NZ'S greatest Olympic pairing is Mark Todd and Charisma  ... 

Then he had to sell it for a couple of SOB nosebleeds… ;)

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

@JimCT, ok a couple of questions? 

1. Is the rider or the horse the athlete? 

2. Are the riders called jockey's?  

3. Since you're involved with this sport, Did Jess deserve this or was it her name? You're personal opinion? 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 minutes ago, Jimmy James said:

@JimCT, ok a couple of questions? 

1. Is the rider or the horse the athlete? 

2. Are the riders called jockey's?  

3. Since you're involved with this sport, Did Jess deserve this or was it her name? You're personal opinion? 

Technically, the rider is the athlete - the Olympics are for humans, after all. Anyone in the sport would describe the equestrian competition as a partnership between horse and rider.

They're called riders. Jockey's ride racehorses.

Jess is a talented rider who has worked very hard to get to this level. She absolutely earned it - no one gave her a spot based on her name.

  • Like 5
  • Thanks 1
  • Bruuuuce! 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

17 minutes ago, Jimmy James said:

 Did Jess deserve this or was it her name? You're personal opinion? 

 

8 minutes ago, JimCT said:

She absolutely earned it - no one gave her a spot based on her name.

Jessica is the third ranked rider in the US, and Don Juan de Whatsit is the top ranked horse.

image.png.8826cdca1064e55b95b29f3ebaa150ff.png

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

44 minutes ago, Born To Walk said:

 

Jessica is the third ranked rider in the US, and Don Juan de Whatsit is the top ranked horse.

image.png.8826cdca1064e55b95b29f3ebaa150ff.png

So how can Jessica be ranked third yet her horse can be ranked first? 

Not being an ass here, just seems weird. I can google these questions and get answers, but I would rather have a conversation here! 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, Jimmy James said:

So how can Jessica be ranked third yet her horse can be ranked first? 

Riders don't only ride one horse. Her personal ranking takes into account other horses.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, Jimmy James said:

So how can Jessica be ranked third yet her horse can be ranked first? 

Not being an ass here, just seems weird. I can google these questions and get answers, but I would rather have a conversation here! 

Because the pros ride lots of horses, but Jess probably fewer than many others. So other riders have their results divided among many more horses.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Born To Walk said:

 

Jessica is the third ranked rider in the US, and Don Juan de Whatsit is the top ranked horse.

image.png.8826cdca1064e55b95b29f3ebaa150ff.png

I imagine that calling a horse CONTAGIOUS isnt going to go downw ell in this COVID world?

  • Haha 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

35 minutes ago, AMIW said:

I imagine that calling a horse CONTAGIOUS isnt going to go downw ell in this COVID world?

Horses are named at birth. They are usually not renamed, certainly internationally. This one is a 2009 model, and the son of a Holsteiner stallion Contagio. He's registered in the Bavarian studbook, which I know nothing about, but most of the German ones require male offspring to be named with the same first letter of the sire.

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Born To Walk said:

 

Jessica is the third ranked rider in the US, and Don Juan de Whatsit is the top ranked horse.

image.png.8826cdca1064e55b95b29f3ebaa150ff.png

I've seen the top 3 riders compete but not sure if I've seen the top 3 horses...:D

  • Bruuuuce! 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

OK, I know very little about this event in the Olympics'. One last question: Is this a judged competition? Or is it timed/whoever finishes the course first wins sport?   

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Her horse, Don Juan van de Donkhoeve, is of Belgian origin. It (or he?) was bred by De Donkhoeve in Hamme, East Flanders. "Belgium is a breeding country with many good horses". Yihaaaaw

Bruce_Springsteen_watching_Jessica_Springsteen_Volage_Du_Val_Henry_KS67529_xgaplus.thumb.jpg.dd585fa58ef9b2454c20699ff877302b.jpg

(I guess this is not that Don Juan from wherever horse)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, JimCT said:

Horses are named at birth. They are usually not renamed, certainly internationally. This one is a 2009 model, and the son of a Holsteiner stallion Contagio. He's registered in the Bavarian studbook, which I know nothing about, but most of the German ones require male offspring to be named with the same first letter of the sire.

Family tree Don Juan

167582817_DonJuanfamilytree.thumb.JPG.9aadaed00e82adb9bb4642981f98e26c.JPG

Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 minutes ago, Jimmy James said:

Wow, a little over $/E 100,000 for the number 1 horse? Seems to be a bad investment? Has to cost twice that much for the up keep! 

Stud fees. ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

No idea about the exact price for this Don Juan horse, but from the same origin, Nippon van de Donkhoeve was sold for € 18.000,00

But it is more like a hobby and passion for the breeder Gustaaf Quintelier.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

55 minutes ago, Jimmy James said:

OK, I know very little about this event in the Olympics'. One last question: Is this a judged competition? Or is it timed/whoever finishes the course first wins sport?   

Showjumping is purely a timed event. The course will have a variety of obstacles. Fences are either verticals (single set of poles, sitting in "cups" on the verticals), or oxers (2 verticals spread apart to create depth, but set so close together that they must be jumped as one effort - if both are the same height it's a "square oxer", otherwise the front fence might be 10cm lower, and the spread can be up to 2m), or a triple bar (three verticals set close together in ascending height, jumped as a single effort, with a spread of up to 2.20m), or a "plank" (essentially a vertical, but the top-most rung is a plank ~12" top-to-bottom resting on a flat ledge, so very easy to dislodge). In addition, a course can include either 3 double combinations (2 fences set a specific distance apart, allowing the horse to land after the first and take one or two strides before the second) or 1 double and 1 triple (3 fences set in quick succession), labeled #A/#B/#C. Combinations may consist of only verticals and/or oxers, IIRC. If there is a water tray under an obstacle (just in front of, or centered under, or just behind) it's termed a "Liverpool". There can also be a water jump of up to 4 meters wide - just a wide pool.

Olympic courses generally run 12-14 numbered obstacles IIRC, plus any a/b/c components, up to a maximum height of ~1.60m, or 10cm higher. Spreads on oxers can be up to 2m. Now go put two things each 5'3 tall 6.5 feet apart, and imaging getting you and your 1500 pound horse over that with room to spare.

The riders walk the course beforehand, determining the optimum path from one obstacle to the next and measuring the distance by their human strides and converting that to horse strides, building a map in their mind - "fence 1 off my eye, then bend right and 5 strides to fence 2, bend left and 6 strides to the vertical at 3A and 2 strides to the oxer at 3B, ...". They will have a plan and a rhythm for the entire course. Each top rail that falls is 4 faults. Each second over the maximum allowable time for a course incurs time faults - US was 1 fault for each second, FEI IIRC was 1 fault for every 4 seconds. Fewest faults wins, and lowest time breaks ties.

So the first time through the course (unless it's a single round "speed course", in which case it's pure time, less jumping faults) the objective is to have 0 jumping faults and be within the time allowed. All those tied at the end of the first round (so ideally, all those with 0 faults) have a jump-off, a shorter course where speed will determine the winner, assuming no jumping faults.

With that long explanation, now watch London 2012, and Nick Skelton GBR (now Sir Nick ;)) and Big Star, and see if that makes sense.

 

  • Like 5
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

37 minutes ago, el sergio said:

Her horse, Don Juan van de Donkhoeve, is of Belgian origin. It (or he?) was bred by De Donkhoeve in Hamme, East Flanders. "Belgium is a breeding country with many good horses". Yihaaaaw

List of all jumping horses from Belgian breeders participating in Tokio for the Olympics:

Australia - Edwina Tops-Alexander - Identity Vitseroel (breeded by Michel Vanderhasselt)

Belgium - Niels Bruynseels - Delux van T&L (breeded by T&L NV)
Yves Vanderhasselt - Jeunesse (breeded by De Manekam CVBA) - reserve

Germany - Christian Kukuk - Mumbai (breeded by Kurt De Clercq)
Daniel Deusser - Killer Queen VDM (breeded by Dirk-Ann BruggemanCarpentier)

France - Simon Delestre - Berlux Z (breeded by Laveco NV)

Ireland  Shane Sweetnam - Karlin van ‘t Vennehof (breeded by Jos Voeten) - reserve

Mexico - Eugenio Garza Perez - Armani SL Z (breeded by  Thierry Hendrikx)
Manuel Gonzalez Dufrasne - Hortensia van de Leeuwerk (breeded by  Ronald Joosen)

Spain - Eduardo Alvarez Aznar - Legend (breeded by Jonas Boone)

UK - Scott Brash - Hello Jefferson (breeded by Bernard Mols) Harry Charles - Romeo 88  breeded by Picobello Horses)

USA - Jessica Springsteen - Don Juan van de Donkhoeve (breeded by Gustaaf Quintelier)
Kent Farrington - Gazelle (breeded by Werner Heuninckx-Van Hoornyck)

Sweden - Malin Baryard-Johnsson - Indiana (breeded by W. Vanderlinden-Van TurtelboomRuys)
Henrik von Eckermann - King Edward (breeded by Wim Impens)

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 minutes ago, JimCT said:

Showjumping is purely a timed event. The course will have a variety of obstacles. Fences are either verticals (single set of poles, sitting in "cups" on the verticals), or oxers (2 verticals spread apart to create depth, but set so close together that they must be jumped as one effort - if both are the same height it's a "square oxer", otherwise the front fence might be 10cm lower, and the spread can be up to 2m), or a triple bar (three verticals set close together in ascending height, jumped as a single effort, with a spread of up to 2.20m), or a "plank" (essentially a vertical, but the top-most rung is a plank ~12" top-to-bottom resting on a flat ledge, so very easy to dislodge). In addition, a course can include either 3 double combinations (2 fences set a specific distance apart, allowing the horse to land after the first and take one or two strides before the second) or 1 double and 1 triple (3 fences set in quick succession), labeled #A/#B/#C. Combinations may consist of only verticals and/or oxers, IIRC. If there is a water tray under an obstacle (just in front of, or centered under, or just behind) it's termed a "Liverpool". There can also be a water jump of up to 4 meters wide - just a wide pool.

Olympic courses generally run 12-14 numbered obstacles IIRC, plus any a/b/c components, up to a maximum height of ~1.60m, or 10cm higher. Spreads on oxers can be up to 2m. Now go put two things each 5'3 tall 6.5 feet apart, and imaging getting you and your 1500 pound horse over that with room to spare.

The riders walk the course beforehand, determining the optimum path from one obstacle to the next and measuring the distance by their human strides and converting that to horse strides, building a map in their mind - "fence 1 off my eye, then bend right and 5 strides to fence 2, bend left and 6 strides to the vertical at 3A and 2 strides to the oxer at 3B, ...". They will have a plan and a rhythm for the entire course. Each top rail that falls is 4 faults. Each second over the maximum allowable time for a course incurs time faults - US was 1 fault for each second, FEI IIRC was 1 fault for every 4 seconds. Fewest faults wins, and lowest time breaks ties.

So the first time through the course (unless it's a single round "speed course", in which case it's pure time, less jumping faults) the objective is to have 0 jumping faults and be within the time allowed. All those tied at the end of the first round (so ideally, all those with 0 faults) have a jump-off, a shorter course where speed will determine the winner, assuming no jumping faults.

Put another way, the winner is the fastest one who knocks the least fences down :rolleyes:

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...