Jump to content
Greasy Lake Community

Jessica going to the Olympics


Recommended Posts

8 minutes ago, Promise61 said:

He's very famous and very wealthy. He also probably bought the horse. So I'm sure he'll be there.

:-)

What matters is who is on the paperwork filed with USEF. I have experience with this ;)

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

For those interested, this is a very good story about the specialized efforts of international shipping of elite horses. This airport is in Belgium - Schiphol in Amsterdam also has an excellent facility. JFK in the US has a very new and nice one. MIA is an entry port too, but I've not seen it. All the US team has been in Europe training together, so I expect they were all on this flight.

https://www.worldofshowjumping.com/Olympic-Games/At-the-gate-of-the-Horse-Inn-The-jumping-horses-have-departed-for-Tokyo.html

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jess said her horses fly on Air Horse One. 

It would seem unfair to me that the "ordinary " parents of athletes can't be at the games, but the international rock star can.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, JoanFontaine said:

Jess said her horses fly on Air Horse One. 

It would seem unfair to me that the "ordinary " parents of athletes can't be at the games, but the international rock star can.

Unfortunately there's not much that is fair these days.

Especially if you've got money.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 hours ago, JimCT said:

For those interested, this is a very good story about the specialized efforts of international shipping of elite horses. This airport is in Belgium - Schiphol in Amsterdam also has an excellent facility. JFK in the US has a very new and nice one. MIA is an entry port too, but I've not seen it. All the US team has been in Europe training together, so I expect they were all on this flight.

https://www.worldofshowjumping.com/Olympic-Games/At-the-gate-of-the-Horse-Inn-The-jumping-horses-have-departed-for-Tokyo.html

And they are there :) photo album in link below

https://www.facebook.com/USAjumping/photos/pcb.4499154160118184/4499150790118521/

Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, JoanFontaine said:

It would seem unfair to me that the "ordinary " parents of athletes can't be at the games, but the international rock star can.

From what JimCT has told us, being an "international rock star" doesn't have anything to do with it.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The equestrian events are held on an island in Tokyo Bay, constructed in 1940 and purpose-built for the 1964 Games.

Here's a preview of the cross-country course, always an exciting phase of this challenging competition. As someone who bred horses, and consequently studied hundreds of hours on the science, genomics, physical conformation, etc., I'm always in awe of the skillset developed in elite level jumpers, the ability to adjust stride, elevate 1200+ pounds of horse, plus rider, over 1.60m fences spread 2 or more meters apart, land, collect, and move to the next fence, and the next, etc. Or the different skillset of the dressage horses, with their ability to change gaits smoothly, balance, elevation, flexibility, suspension, and exhibit levels of control, contact, and communication between horse and rider that is simply extraordinary to watch.

But eventing horses, who are challenged to perform dressage, then gallop a 4400+m cross-country course for nearly 8 minutes at ~35 km/hr while jumping a tremendous variety of obstacles, galloping thru ponds, over brush jumps, etc, showing tremendous bravery, stamina, and trust in their rider, and then 2 days later return for stadium jumping, with its exacting level of precision far different from the cross-country, just astound me. 

Having studied breeding I can now look at a pedigree and tell you the "job" a horse was bred for, at least at the elite levels. I remember looking at one of the top German team horses at London and discovering that for more than 100 years the mareline had been bred to an unending succession of Thoroughbred stallions to instill that stamina and endurance, while preserving the mental traits of the warm-blood mareline to enable strong dressage performance and stadium jumping performance. 100+ years of breeding purpose and intent, typical of the family-based breeding you see in Europe, families that cultivate marelines and are indentified with them by their fellow breeders. The Holsteiners, for example, number their marelines to identify and track track them (they also honor the stallions, requiring colts to be named with the same first letter of the sire, so there are C-line Holsteiners - actually 2 different ones, and L-line, etc.), while the Dutch tend to name them after the first prominent mare in the line (e.g., "-minka" or "-sinaa", where each succeeding mare gets a name ending in that identifier).

With the dressage final today tomorrow starts eventing with the dressage phase. As you watch these horses perform remember that in 2 days they will be galloping their hearts out, and marvel at the differnt skills exhibited.

Here's an article about the cross-country course - https://eventingnation.com/welcome-to-eventing-island-your-first-look-at-the-tokyo-2020-cross-country-course/

ETA: see if this links to a map - link

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 hours ago, JoanFontaine said:

Jess said her horses fly on Air Horse One. 

It would seem unfair to me that the "ordinary " parents of athletes can't be at the games, but the international rock star can.

 

1 hour ago, Rizla said:

From what JimCT has told us, being an "international rock star" doesn't have anything to do with it.

Actually, I think it is refreshing for Bruce and Patti that in the horse show world they are actually overshadowed by many, many others. Sure, the popular press focuses on them, but among the competitors and families they are not the biggest focus, because there are so many others of prominence. And at the high level competitions, while we all know the families, without the skills they have developed Jessica, or Georgina Bloomberg, or Eve Jobs, or Jennifer Gates, or countless others wouldn't merit a second look. Believe me, there are other off-spring of billionaires in the ring that just haven't made the leap to the highest level. We're watching the skill, and pay way more attention to the pedigree of the horse than of the rider ;) 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't see anything refreshing about it.  I'm watching the parents of athletes sitting in front of the TV in their living rooms as their children compete.  These parents gave up everything to buy equipment,  lessons and drive their kids to 5 am practices. And they're not there to help prevent the Simone Biles/Naomi Osaka type meltdowns (those are the famous names we know, no doubt there are others).  I don't blame the Springsteens for any of this and wish Jessica well, but I wonder if this double standard is why they are keeping a very low profile in Japan. 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 minutes ago, JoanFontaine said:

I don't see anything refreshing about it.  I'm watching the parents of athletes sitting in front of the TV in their living rooms as their children compete.  These parents gave up everything to buy equipment,  lessons and drive their kids to 5 am practices. And they're not there to help prevent the Simone Biles/Naomi Osaka type meltdowns (those are the famous names we know, no doubt there are others).  I don't blame the Springsteens for any of this and wish Jessica well, but I wonder if this double standard is why they are keeping a very low profile in Japan. 

I expect they're keeping a low profile because that's how they like it. It's never about them at a horse show, in my experience.

Lots of folks, athletes and family, are being deprived of the full Olympic experience, and that's a travesty.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, JoanFontaine said:

I don't see anything refreshing about it.  I'm watching the parents of athletes sitting in front of the TV in their living rooms as their children compete.  These parents gave up everything to buy equipment,  lessons and drive their kids to 5 am practices. And they're not there to help prevent the Simone Biles/Naomi Osaka type meltdowns (those are the famous names we know, no doubt there are others).  I don't blame the Springsteens for any of this and wish Jessica well, but I wonder if this double standard is why they are keeping a very low profile in Japan. 

You've taken what Jim said out of context.  He said,
"I think it is refreshing for Bruce and Patti that in the horse show world they are actually overshadowed by many, many others."

You don't seem to have read the rest of his post at all.   He said nothing about anyone being or not being present at the Games.   He was making a general point about equestrian sport and the people involved in it.

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, JoanFontaine said:

I don't see anything refreshing about it.  I'm watching the parents of athletes sitting in front of the TV in their living rooms as their children compete.  These parents gave up everything to buy equipment,  lessons and drive their kids to 5 am practices. And they're not there to help prevent the Simone Biles/Naomi Osaka type meltdowns (those are the famous names we know, no doubt there are others).  I don't blame the Springsteens for any of this and wish Jessica well, but I wonder if this double standard is why they are keeping a very low profile in Japan. 

I would agree with you in general that it’s a shame the parents of the vast majority of competitors can’t be there. But on the other hand, it’s good for some of these competitors to get a chance to compete without thinking about their parents in the stands watching them. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

27 minutes ago, Jertucky said:

I would agree with you in general that it’s a shame the parents of the vast majority of competitors can’t be there. But on the other hand, it’s good for some of these competitors to get a chance to compete without thinking about their parents in the stands watching them. 

I agree with that statement. When I was playing sports growing up and in High School, my hardest critic was my Father. I always seemed to relax and perform better when he wasn't there. As a parent now, I see he was lonely wanting me to be the best I could be.  

  • Hug 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

All I know is that most of us here have watched they're kids grow up (albeit from a fans distance) and I cant be any more proud of her! This is the biggest honor that can be given to an American Athlete and she has for sure worked her ass off for this!

As for who can/cant attend - Covid sucks, but its just our times. 

Good luck Jessie!!!

 

Brad

  • Like 2
  • Love Love Love! 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Its sad for all the mums and dads from all over the world (including the Japanese ones) who can't go see their child compete in the Olympics 

Its just to the Springsteen's advantage that the rules around the owners of the horses work in their favour and that's great for them and Jes

Doesn't matter how much money mum's and dad's have, its still sad when the mum's and dad's cant go 

In NZ equestrian is not a sport you need a rich mum and dad for - certainly not to start out in 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 minutes ago, JimCT said:

 

The stables look better than the village accommodation for the athletes  ! (The cardboard beds definatly!)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 hours ago, Jimmy James said:

I agree with that statement. When I was playing sports growing up and in High School, my hardest critic was my Father. I always seemed to relax and perform better when he wasn't there. As a parent now, I see he was lonely wanting me to be the best I could be.  

I actually banned my father from coming to my baseball games in high school. What the hell did he know about baseball (other than playing in the minors for the Giants)? Sadly, I didn’t realize it was a selfish thing to do until I became a father myself.

  • Like 1
  • Hug 1
  • Sad 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 7/28/2021 at 9:00 AM, JimCT said:

The equestrian events are held on an island in Tokyo Bay, constructed in 1940 and purpose-built for the 1964 Games.

Here's a preview of the cross-country course, always an exciting phase of this challenging competition. As someone who bred horses, and consequently studied hundreds of hours on the science, genomics, physical conformation, etc., I'm always in awe of the skillset developed in elite level jumpers, the ability to adjust stride, elevate 1200+ pounds of horse, plus rider, over 1.60m fences spread 2 or more meters apart, land, collect, and move to the next fence, and the next, etc. Or the different skillset of the dressage horses, with their ability to change gaits smoothly, balance, elevation, flexibility, suspension, and exhibit levels of control, contact, and communication between horse and rider that is simply extraordinary to watch.

But eventing horses, who are challenged to perform dressage, then gallop a 4400+m cross-country course for nearly 8 minutes at ~35 km/hr while jumping a tremendous variety of obstacles, galloping thru ponds, over brush jumps, etc, showing tremendous bravery, stamina, and trust in their rider, and then 2 days later return for stadium jumping, with its exacting level of precision far different from the cross-country, just astound me. 

Having studied breeding I can now look at a pedigree and tell you the "job" a horse was bred for, at least at the elite levels. I remember looking at one of the top German team horses at London and discovering that for more than 100 years the mareline had been bred to an unending succession of Thoroughbred stallions to instill that stamina and endurance, while preserving the mental traits of the warm-blood mareline to enable strong dressage performance and stadium jumping performance. 100+ years of breeding purpose and intent, typical of the family-based breeding you see in Europe, families that cultivate marelines and are indentified with them by their fellow breeders. The Holsteiners, for example, number their marelines to identify and track track them (they also honor the stallions, requiring colts to be named with the same first letter of the sire, so there are C-line Holsteiners - actually 2 different ones, and L-line, etc.), while the Dutch tend to name them after the first prominent mare in the line (e.g., "-minka" or "-sinaa", where each succeeding mare gets a name ending in that identifier).

With the dressage final today tomorrow starts eventing with the dressage phase. As you watch these horses perform remember that in 2 days they will be galloping their hearts out, and marvel at the differnt skills exhibited.

Here's an article about the cross-country course - https://eventingnation.com/welcome-to-eventing-island-your-first-look-at-the-tokyo-2020-cross-country-course/

ETA: see if this links to a map - link

Nothing to do with Jessica or the jumping, just a wonderful story about this Swedish rider and her horse with a huge heart :) 

https://eventingnation.com/meet-the-one-eyed-horse-competing-in-the-olympics/

  • Hug 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 7/29/2021 at 1:07 PM, Jertucky said:

I actually banned my father from coming to my baseball games in high school. What the hell did he know about baseball (other than playing in the minors for the Giants)? Sadly, I didn’t realize it was a selfish thing to do until I became a father myself.

A lot of parents want children to be the players they could or should have been themselves.  It's not fair on the kid.

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

21 minutes ago, NorthSideJimmy said:

A lot of parents want children to be the players they could or should have been themselves.  It's not fair on the kid.

Absolutely, it’s disgusting to see. My second oldest daughter played soccer in high school for 4 years. My youngest is entering high school in a couple of weeks just tried out for the same team. She got cut. I was sad for her (though she doesn’t seem so heartbroken about it) but happy for me because I sat in the stands for 4 years with parents thinking they were the ones in the field. It was obnoxious and embarrassing, so I typically wouldn’t sit with them. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...