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Who's Still Digging Letter To You


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8 hours ago, BruceWho said:

And that some revues said it was about Trump!

Well, Bruce himself said that didn’t he? Said he started to write it when Bush was in office but couldn’t finish it until Trump was in office. At least that’s what I remember him saying.

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10 minutes ago, Jimmy James said:

I can see this one about half way through the setlist! 

 

I have my doubts that he'll perform it live. It has so many words and seems to be quite straining for Bruce to get through, even on the album. But I'd love to hear it for sure.

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18 minutes ago, CosmicKid said:

I have my doubts that he'll perform it live. It has so many words and seems to be quite straining for Bruce to get through, even on the album. But I'd love to hear it for sure.

Maybe, but that's what a lot have said about Jackson Cage, yet it was played everynight for half a year! 

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16 hours ago, Jertucky said:

Well, Bruce himself said that didn’t he? Said he started to write it when Bush was in office but couldn’t finish it until Trump was in office. At least that’s what I remember him saying.

I haven't heard (or read) that interview or comment

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41 minutes ago, BruceWho said:

I haven't heard (or read) that interview or comment

After a very quick search, this is the best I could find:

Bruce has stated that he originally wrote “Rainmaker” about former U.S. President George W. Bush, but of course the obvious comparison is to Donald Trump, who famously came to power as a populist by validating fears that were already present, instilling ones that weren’t, and promising in true rainmaker fashion that he alone could fix it.
 

from this article:

https://estreetshuffle.com/index.php/2021/02/12/roll-of-the-dice-rainmaker/

 

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I think it holds up. I think of it very much as a full circle album due to the mortality aspect of the songs and the three old ones re-recorded. If this is the 

 

The opening and closing songs work really well effectively bookend the album

 

The LMS, TPOP, 1000Guitars sequence in the middle is still for me the heart of the record.

 

I think Rainmaker is brilliant. The most rocking song on it with the best lyrics (Ghosts is good but doesnt come close)

 

If it’s the last E street album, i’m happy that it’s this one (wouldnt have felt that way in 2009).

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I think I like the 'making of' film more than I like the album itself.

It's only half an album of new songs. Which followed an album which was nearly a decade old when that was released. No big deal, but possibly his songwriting days are behind him.

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44 minutes ago, Promise61 said:

I think I like the 'making of' film more than I like the album itself.

It's only half an album of new songs. Which followed an album which was nearly a decade old when that was released. No big deal, but possibly his songwriting days are behind him.

Spot on. The film is great, but it’s probably as fiction as truth. 

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That album kind of just came and went for me. It's ok but I prefer Western Stars.  

I really like 'If I was the Priest' and Burnin' Train'. 

'I'll See You in My Dreams' was played at my sister's funeral a few weeks back. 

The 'Dylanesque' 'Jeannie' and 'Orphans' are quite boring and not a patch on the real thing. Bruce simply lacks Dylan's ability and skills with language and wordplay to sustain interest beyond three verses.

The core of the album - the songs about growing up, being in a band etc - kind of just a bit ordinary for my taste. 

The bit where he repeats House of a Thousand Guitars over and over really grates on my nerves. 

Rainmaker lacks a decent, original tune. Sounds like something we've already heard before. 

I still follow Bruce because of the impact of his core iconic era up to and including BUSA plus the amazing live shows up the last time I saw him (2012). This is ultimately just a form of brand loyalty but at the end of the day there's other artists I follow who quite frankly wipe the floor with Springsteen the lyricist and Springsteen the musician - though not necessarily the live performer which is where his real legacy lies.

 

 

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58 minutes ago, Demos said:

That album kind of just came and went for me. It's ok but I prefer Western Stars.  

I really like 'If I was the Priest' and Burnin' Train'. 

'I'll See You in My Dreams' was played at my sister's funeral a few weeks back. 

The 'Dylanesque' 'Jeannie' and 'Orphans' are quite boring and not a patch on the real thing. Bruce simply lacks Dylan's ability and skills with language and wordplay to sustain interest beyond three verses.

The core of the album - the songs about growing up, being in a band etc - kind of just a bit ordinary for my taste. 

The bit where he repeats House of a Thousand Guitars over and over really grates on my nerves. 

Rainmaker lacks a decent, original tune. Sounds like something we've already heard before. 

I still follow Bruce because of the impact of his core iconic era up to and including BUSA plus the amazing live shows up the last time I saw him (2012). This is ultimately just a form of brand loyalty but at the end of the day there's other artists I follow who quite frankly wipe the floor with Springsteen the lyricist and Springsteen the musician - though not necessarily the live performer which is where his real legacy lies.

 

 

I agree with almost everything you say here.  Spot on about the "Dylanesque" songs, although I include "Priest" with those.  I am unconvinced that there is any meaning to these, they are just a collection of random words and phrases thrown together that he thought sounded cool.  If he ever gives a thorough and convincing explanation that proves me wrong, I will happily apologise.

"The bit where he repeats House of a Thousand Guitars over and over really grates on my nerves."
Oh yes.  Cringe.  A horridly clunky and discordant phrase to begin with.

I'll still go and see him if I have the opportunity, but I don't want to hear too many of the songs from this album, apart from Burning Train, which is a banger.

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10 hours ago, Demos said:

That album kind of just came and went for me. It's ok but I prefer Western Stars.  

I really like 'If I was the Priest' and Burnin' Train'. 

'I'll See You in My Dreams' was played at my sister's funeral a few weeks back. 

The 'Dylanesque' 'Jeannie' and 'Orphans' are quite boring and not a patch on the real thing. Bruce simply lacks Dylan's ability and skills with language and wordplay to sustain interest beyond three verses.

The core of the album - the songs about growing up, being in a band etc - kind of just a bit ordinary for my taste. 

The bit where he repeats House of a Thousand Guitars over and over really grates on my nerves. 

Rainmaker lacks a decent, original tune. Sounds like something we've already heard before. 

I still follow Bruce because of the impact of his core iconic era up to and including BUSA plus the amazing live shows up the last time I saw him (2012). This is ultimately just a form of brand loyalty but at the end of the day there's other artists I follow who quite frankly wipe the floor with Springsteen the lyricist and Springsteen the musician - though not necessarily the live performer which is where his real legacy lies.

 

 

Our condolences to you and your family for your sister

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After almost a year, I hear the "Letter To You" album as roughly three disjoint components, and here is my breakdown:

The Good: The songs "Letter To You", "Last Man Standing", "Ghosts", and "I'll See You In My Dreams" would have made a great standalone EP.  I think those four songs would have concisely captured the theme of the new writing while still offering some new rock and roll.

The Bad: Then there are hodge podge of filler songs ("Burnin' Train", "The Power Of Prayer", "House Of A Thousand Guitars") and songs that sound like leftovers from "Wrecking Ball" ("Rainmaker") or "Western Stars" ("One Minute You're Here").  Not terrible songs, but definitely not proof that Bruce broke through his supposed recent writer's block.

The Ugly: "Janey Needs A Shooter", "If I Was The Priest", and "Song For Orphans" did not need to be dusted off after nearly 50 years just to fill out 12 songs on the album.  The songwriting on these was not great when they were new (if they were good, Bruce would have already officially recorded them), and today they really sound very out of place next to the other themes on the album.

However, I do really enjoy the sound of the album; namely, the live band in the studio with classic E Street instrumentation and minimal studio trickery.  His voice and the band's playing are in excellent form, and if Bruce only had enough better new material, he could have checked all the boxes for me and hit it out of the park with this one.

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1 hour ago, badlands78 said:

After almost a year, I hear the "Letter To You" album as roughly three disjoint components, and here is my breakdown:

The Good: The songs "Letter To You", "Last Man Standing", "Ghosts", and "I'll See You In My Dreams" would have made a great standalone EP.  I think those four songs would have concisely captured the theme of the new writing while still offering some new rock and roll.

The Bad: Then there are hodge podge of filler songs ("Burnin' Train", "The Power Of Prayer", "House Of A Thousand Guitars") and songs that sound like leftovers from "Wrecking Ball" ("Rainmaker") or "Western Stars" ("One Minute You're Here").  Not terrible songs, but definitely not proof that Bruce broke through his supposed recent writer's block.

The Ugly: "Janey Needs A Shooter", "If I Was The Priest", and "Song For Orphans" did not need to be dusted off after nearly 50 years just to fill out 12 songs on the album.  The songwriting on these was not great when they were new (if they were good, Bruce would have already officially recorded them), and today they really sound very out of place next to the other themes on the album.

However, I do really enjoy the sound of the album; namely, the live band in the studio with classic E Street instrumentation and minimal studio trickery.  His voice and the band's playing are in excellent form, and if Bruce only had enough better new material, he could have checked all the boxes for me and hit it out of the park with this one.

This is very well put. I don’t agree on some things you say (for instance, I really like ‘Burning Train’ and ‘Rainmaker’) but I think you’re right in highlighting the album three different (and often disjoint) ‘components’. 

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18 hours ago, Eileen said:

So sorry to read the sad news about your sister, @Demos.

 

Thank you. She caught Covid around February and never really fully recovered.  Still can't believe it. Makes me wonder if the way the stats are presented in the UK really counts the full impact. 

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11 hours ago, badlands78 said:

After almost a year, I hear the "Letter To You" album as roughly three disjoint components, and here is my breakdown:

The Good: The songs "Letter To You", "Last Man Standing", "Ghosts", and "I'll See You In My Dreams" would have made a great standalone EP.  I think those four songs would have concisely captured the theme of the new writing while still offering some new rock and roll.

The Bad: Then there are hodge podge of filler songs ("Burnin' Train", "The Power Of Prayer", "House Of A Thousand Guitars") and songs that sound like leftovers from "Wrecking Ball" ("Rainmaker") or "Western Stars" ("One Minute You're Here").  Not terrible songs, but definitely not proof that Bruce broke through his supposed recent writer's block.

The Ugly: "Janey Needs A Shooter", "If I Was The Priest", and "Song For Orphans" did not need to be dusted off after nearly 50 years just to fill out 12 songs on the album.  The songwriting on these was not great when they were new (if they were good, Bruce would have already officially recorded them), and today they really sound very out of place next to the other themes on the album.

However, I do really enjoy the sound of the album; namely, the live band in the studio with classic E Street instrumentation and minimal studio trickery.  His voice and the band's playing are in excellent form, and if Bruce only had enough better new material, he could have checked all the boxes for me and hit it out of the park with this one.

This is interesting. I’ve kind developed the same feeling about Darkness, though I wouldn’t describe them as good, bad, and ugly. I find it a bit disjointed and find I skip more songs on there than I ever thought I would when I listen to it these days. 
One thing the three older songs have highlighted for me was how much more I enjoyed his old writing style. The songs are more about sharing a story than a point of view.

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1 hour ago, Jertucky said:

This is interesting. I’ve kind developed the same feeling about Darkness, though I wouldn’t describe them as good, bad, and ugly. I find it a bit disjointed and find I skip more songs on there than I ever thought I would when I listen to it these days. 
One thing the three older songs have highlighted for me was how much more I enjoyed his old writing style. The songs are more about sharing a story than a point of view.

 

woman-fainting.jpg

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Darkness is like the bible

You dont disrespect the good book or you risk the apocalypse 

 

Wait a minute ...

Who's been dissing Darkness...

Gary ........???

200701_coronavirus_hero_0.jpg

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12 hours ago, Daisey Jeep said:

Darkness is like the bible

You dont disrespect the good book or you risk the apocalypse 

 

Wait a minute ...

Who's been dissing Darkness...

Gary ........???

200701_coronavirus_hero_0.jpg

I’m not dissing it necessarily, I just don’t find it nearly as enjoyable as I used to. The moaning and wailing on a couple of the songs doesn’t help.

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4 hours ago, Jertucky said:

I’m not dissing it necessarily, I just don’t find it nearly as enjoyable as I used to. The moaning and wailing on a couple of the songs doesn’t help.

I was going to start a thread (not attacking you btw:)) last night when i got home but when i got home and switches on the news bloody covid has taken over our lives again so i forgot 

 

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