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Excerpt from Stevens upcoming Autobiography


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23 minutes ago, Frank said:

It all depends on what serious money means. Is it rock star’s serious money, or ordinary profession’s serious money?

Speaking as a postman with 3 children, definitely the former!

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3 hours ago, MacBruce said:

Garry Tallent said in an interview last year that he only started to make any serious money with the ESB during the Born in the USA tour. I found that surprising as well. 

I remember reading once that at one stage - before they got really big - that a bass player in an ESB tribute band got paid more than  Garry

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18 hours ago, Frank said:

Yes, this was exactly my point. Jagger-Richards ARE the songwriters for the band they're both in. Bruce is a solo act, regardless on the overwhelming importance of the E Street Band for his career. The impression I got from the excerpt above is that Steve would like to be a Richards-like kind of figure as is Bruce & The E Street Band was a unit like The Rolling Stones. My point was that dressing like a pirate is not enough to be Keith Richards. You must also write half the material. As for the production credits you are right, he was part of the production team for The River and, to a far lesser extent, Born in the USA (Landau's brain-child). 

So what you are suggesting is that from the Van Zandt quote "I felt I had been giving him nothing but good advice and had dedicated my whole life and career to him without asking for a thing. I felt I’d earned an official position in the decision-making process", the "official position" here Stevie is hinting at is being co-writer on Springsteen's own albums?

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10 hours ago, Daisey Jeep said:

I remember reading once that at one stage - before they got really big - that a bass player in an ESB tribute band got paid more than  Garry

Are we therefore to take it that Gary was the member of the band who wanted more money but was advised to "look in the mirror"?

 

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40 minutes ago, USAman said:

Are we therefore to take it that Gary was the member of the band who wanted more money but was advised to "look in the mirror"?

 

:o

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4 hours ago, el sergio said:

So what you are suggesting is that from the Van Zandt quote "I felt I had been giving him nothing but good advice and had dedicated my whole life and career to him without asking for a thing. I felt I’d earned an official position in the decision-making process", the "official position" here Stevie is hinting at is being co-writer on Springsteen's own albums?

I’m not suggesting anything like that, nor I have quoted the above passage in any of my replies in this thread. 

And BTW, do you really think Steve would have had any “career” if he hadn’t been riding on Bruce? He got his break as Bruce spin off, and his career went down as soon as Bruce’s massive popularity declined over the late eighties. He might not have “asked for a thing” as he claims, but he got a professional life out of Bruce (before and after living the band). As I said, I really like Steve, and I have all his albums (+ what he wrote for Southside Johnny) but his supposed “good advice” would have probably given Bruce a Southside Johnny’s career.  

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56 minutes ago, Frank said:

a Southside Johnny’s career.  

Always busy, a great band line-up, tours galore in front of loyal fans?

Only thing missing is oodles of money.

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1 hour ago, Eileen said:

Always busy, a great band line-up, tours galore in front of loyal fans?

Only thing missing is oodles of money.

But virtually unknown outside the east coast if not because of Springsteen (if Wikipedia is to be trusted, Johnny hasn’t had a contract with a proper recording label since 1991). Let’s admit it: music industry is a dog eats dog business, where only the top dogs survive in the long run. Making or breaking it for the others is often a matter of connections, not a choice. Southside Johnny is a minor act that mostly survives out of Springsteen’s lore. If Asbury Park hadn’t had Bruce, Johnny (and Steve) would have probably spent their professional lives doing regular full time jobs. 

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3 hours ago, Frank said:

If Asbury Park hadn’t had Bruce, Johnny (and Steve) would have probably spent their professional lives doing regular full time jobs. 

We'll agree to differ.  :)

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1 hour ago, Eileen said:

We'll agree to differ.  :)

Absolutely, although a quick check on Wikipedia teaches a lot about what Southside’s career has been since the early eighties. As I said, you cannot simply chose to be small. The industry doesn’t allow you such a privilege. Johnny was dropped by his recoding company around the time Steve went solo, he was re-boosted by Bruce and Bon Jovi in 1991, and he has basically produced his music by himself ever since. Now big bands cost. Just ask young Bruce Springsteen. And you’re not going to keep such a big band for long without a recording contract or by playing clubs on a restricted area. It may happen if your following has always been boosted by your connections with a top tier star. 

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52 minutes ago, Frank said:

Absolutely, although a quick check on Wikipedia

Much more informative pages/sites out there. I was originally on the Jukes' site then somebody mentioned this place.

I consider it my job to stick up for Johnny at every opportunity. ;)

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I remember hearing that Little Steven corrected one of the notes in the main guitar riff in Born To Run. If that is the case, Bruce owes his career after Born To Run to Little Steven. If that song didn't hit just right, the entire album could've flopped and he could've been dropped from Columbia. 

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50 minutes ago, rockaway88 said:

I remember hearing that Little Steven corrected one of the notes in the main guitar riff in Born To Run. If that is the case, Bruce owes his career after Born To Run to Little Steven. If that song didn't hit just right, the entire album could've flopped and he could've been dropped from Columbia. 

This was a mixing issue - Bruce bent a note a half step up, but the bend itself got buried in the mix, which would have made the note in question part of an E minor scale for a riff in played in E major. 

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21 hours ago, Frank said:

I’m not suggesting anything like that, nor I have quoted the above passage in any of my replies in this thread. 

And BTW, do you really think Steve would have had any “career” if he hadn’t been riding on Bruce? He got his break as Bruce spin off, and his career went down as soon as Bruce’s massive popularity declined over the late eighties. He might not have “asked for a thing” as he claims, but he got a professional life out of Bruce (before and after living the band). As I said, I really like Steve, and I have all his albums (+ what he wrote for Southside Johnny) but his supposed “good advice” would have probably given Bruce a Southside Johnny’s career.  

This. I'm sure Bruce appreciates his good friend's input - and may or may not go with it, but he calls the shots...hence all the comments from Steve about "lost arguments". And...going by the result, Bruce's decisions turned out to be good ones. Also, you could argue that Steve's solo career never really took off in the first place. The first two records were moderately successful because he still had the E Street connection (and MwW had E Street all over it, even Bruce sang on the record), but as soon as that was gone, the whole thing pretty much tanked. He came back only when the combined  E Street reunion/Sopranos thing started. I love Steve's stage persona, but here, he comes across as rather self-indulged and full of himself.  To think Sun City ended Apartheid is like saying Hasselhoff tore down the Berlin Wall. With all due respect...but no.

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I very poste fro article/book

I very possibly wouldn’t have gotten into politics. Would Mandela have gotten out of jail? Would the South African government have fallen? Probably. But we took years off both of those things.

 

pretty much sums Steve up really

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4 hours ago, NoneButTheBrave said:

 I'm sure Bruce appreciates his good friend's input - and may or may not go with it, but he calls the shots...hence all the comments from Steve about "lost arguments". And...going by the result, Bruce's decisions turned out to be good ones.

Did they, though?   When you look at the quality of some of the out-takes, it strikes me that Bruce could have had a lot more hit singles than he did.  Which could have drawn more people in to listen to more of his music. 

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Steve was on 6 Music this afternoon interviewed by Liz Kershaw. She's a major fan girl, always has been.

Anyway, when asked, he said he has not been approached to tour next year, and he'll wait for a press release like everyone else.

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15 minutes ago, Promise61 said:

Steve was on 6 Music this afternoon interviewed by Liz Kershaw. She's a major fan girl, always has been.

Anyway, when asked, he said he has not been approached to tour next year, and he'll wait for a press release like everyone else.

I seem to remember Jake learning of the 2016 tour by being asked about it.

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2 hours ago, MacBruce said:

Steve contributed to Tenth Avenue...it was his idea to have the horns on that song and also he helped with the arrangement.

This is not completely correct. The horns were already there but Bruce and Co couldn’t find a proper arrangement. The legend goes (actually Bruce tells it in the Wings for Wheels documentary) Steve walked in the studio and immediately told the horns what to do. The result is the track we hear on BTR. But to be honest, Steve would put horns in his morning coffee, if he could. ;)

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31 minutes ago, Promise61 said:

Steve was on 6 Music this afternoon interviewed by Liz Kershaw. She's a major fan girl, always has been.

Anyway, when asked, he said he has not been approached to tour next year, and he'll wait for a press release like everyone else.

No album-tour-album-tour-album mode anymore?

An E Street 2022 tour must be a given then. ;)

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2 hours ago, Rizla said:

Did they, though?   When you look at the quality of some of the out-takes, it strikes me that Bruce could have had a lot more hit singles than he did.  Which could have drawn more people in to listen to more of his music. 

True, but how much bigger could he get or have gotten? He consciously threw out potential super hits if he felt they they didn't fit on a particular record. Hell, he didn't put out BITUSA 2 in 86/87. He could have had 4 more BITUSA type records after the original one...did he always make the right decision? Putting Crush on You on The River answers that  question. But I do believe his decisions are informed by his vision and his artistic integrity rather than chasing hits. In the long run,  it resulted in his being one of the biggest rock stars of all time and an American cultural icon with global (universal) appeal. 

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2 hours ago, NoneButTheBrave said:

True, but how much bigger could he get or have gotten? He consciously threw out potential super hits if he felt they they didn't fit on a particular record. Hell, he didn't put out BITUSA 2 in 86/87. He could have had 4 more BITUSA type records after the original one...did he always make the right decision? Putting Crush on You on The River answers that  question. But I do believe his decisions are informed by his vision and his artistic integrity rather than chasing hits. In the long run,  it resulted in his being one of the biggest rock stars of all time and an American cultural icon with global (universal) appeal. 

And yet the vast majority wouldn't be able to name many of his songs besides Born In The USA.  Which is largely misunderstood and unfortunately remains the song which defines him for many.

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1 hour ago, Rizla said:

And yet the vast majority wouldn't be able to name many of his songs besides Born In The USA.  Which is largely misunderstood and unfortunately remains the song which defines him for many.

The whole schtick surrounding BITUSA was a conscious marketing decision. It's not like he came up with this version out of nowhere, not to mention the cover shot, the Rambo-with-a-guitar looks, the fist in the air, the giant flag on stage, particularly in that era...as for the song as such, he could have set the record straight (and kind of half-assed his way around it in his reaction to Reagan) in a heartbeat...but chose not to. Of course, the BITUSA songs are his most famous. It was his pre-planned super smash hit. And, of course, he has/had a massive body of work as well as a career spanning five decades, so I guess that's only natural. Most people know only the hits by most artists. 

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