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Springsteen at 9/11 Memorial


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Just an observation.  The man never wears a suit, claims he even hates wearing them. Perhaps the fit type of suit, since there are many simply provides a look everyone here isn't used to. Perhaps it's a fitted suit that simply showcases what his body actually is. I can't believe I'm actually engaging in this conversation..lol

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On 9/11/2021 at 10:09 AM, Promise61 said:

As rough as.  Maybe it was the emotion of the occasion.  But it was beautiful at the same time.

I love the fact that he was dressed the way that he was. I also love the fact he avoided anything from the The Rising album.

The Rising songs were instrumentals in Memorial ads. 

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8 hours ago, stillilllife said:

Side note, but I (as a non-native English speaker)'ve never understood that thing where one ends a sentence with the word mind as in the quote above. I'm sure it's gramatically correct but to me it just looks weird somehow. I think I get what it means in this context, but I don't understand why it's supposed to be the last word of the sentence and also without a comma. Can you/anyone explain?

I didn't understand it ether and I speaks real good English.

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16 hours ago, stillilllife said:

Side note, but I (as a non-native English speaker)'ve never understood that thing where one ends a sentence with the word mind as in the quote above. I'm sure it's gramatically correct but to me it just looks weird somehow. I think I get what it means in this context, but I don't understand why it's supposed to be the last word of the sentence and also without a comma. Can you/anyone explain?

I know what you mean like.

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18 hours ago, stillilllife said:

Side note, but I (as a non-native English speaker)'ve never understood that thing where one ends a sentence with the word mind as in the quote above. I'm sure it's gramatically correct but to me it just looks weird somehow. I think I get what it means in this context, but I don't understand why it's supposed to be the last word of the sentence and also without a comma. Can you/anyone explain?

Perhaps consider it as another example of the vagaries and joys of colloquial English language in all its regional variations, and another example of just how irregular the English language is!

You are correct to think that 'mind' should have a comma before it: it's a short form here of "mind you", which could also be expressed as "by the way", or "between you and me". If you recast this phrase as "Mind you, I would be surprised to see another E Street tour", you'll have the full sense of it. Substituting one of the alternative terms suggested for 'Mind you' should enable you to see how it simply serves to mark an afterthought or additional comment in this context.

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10 hours ago, THUE said:

Just an observation.  The man never wears a suit, claims he even hates wearing them. Perhaps the fit type of suit, since there are many simply provides a look everyone here isn't used to. Perhaps it's a fitted suit that simply showcases what his body actually is. I can't believe I'm actually engaging in this conversation..lol

that's a very good point 

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12 hours ago, PattyC said:

On the beach today. He looks okay. 

FB91506B-81AC-474D-8FE6-42A8074717CA.jpeg

he looks pretty darn hot if you ask me 

nice to see all the bracletes too ;)

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12 hours ago, THUE said:

Just an observation.  The man never wears a suit, claims he even hates wearing them. Perhaps the fit type of suit, since there are many simply provides a look everyone here isn't used to. Perhaps it's a fitted suit that simply showcases what his body actually is. I can't believe I'm actually engaging in this conversation..lol

His suits in ‘88 looked alright (even with the bolo tie)

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23 hours ago, stillilllife said:

Side note, but I (as a non-native English speaker)'ve never understood that thing where one ends a sentence with the word mind as in the quote above. I'm sure it's gramatically correct but to me it just looks weird somehow. I think I get what it means in this context, but I don't understand why it's supposed to be the last word of the sentence and also without a comma. Can you/anyone explain?

explaining the English language (from this side of the pond) would take more words than my fingers could possibly type, never mind the local dialects Eileen lives about 90 miles north of me and will speak in a different tongue,with words which woulsd often confuse me and so in a nutshell i cant explain. why do americans say math and not maths. now thats weird

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22 minutes ago, stevie54uk said:

explaining the English language (from this side of the pond) would take more words than my fingers could possibly type, never mind the local dialects Eileen lives about 90 miles north of me and will speak in a different tongue,with words which woulsd often confuse me and so in a nutshell i cant explain. why do americans say math and not maths. now thats weird

Math is normal, maths is weird.

My spellcheck flags maths as an error.

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3 hours ago, stevie54uk said:

explaining the English language (from this side of the pond) would take more words than my fingers could possibly type, never mind the local dialects Eileen lives about 90 miles north of me and will speak in a different tongue,with words which woulsd often confuse me and so in a nutshell i cant explain. why do americans say math and not maths. now thats weird

Is it a short version of "mind you"?

Edit: It is! Found it:
https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/mind you

"often used in British English without you
His advice wasn't very helpful. I'm not criticizing him, mind!"

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1 hour ago, stillilllife said:

Is it a short version of "mind you"?

Edit: It is! Found it:
https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/mind you

"often used in British English without you
His advice wasn't very helpful. I'm not criticizing him, mind!"

I just realized that that quote from the website kinda sounds like I'm slagging off stevie54uk for not really giving me a proper answer...Which was not my intention, haha.

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3 hours ago, Eileen said:

Do you say mathematics or mathematic?

I haven't used either one for many many years so I don't know which one I would use, but am leaning towards mathematics since it sounds right.

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11 hours ago, burghfan said:

I haven't used either one for many many years so I don't know which one I would use, but am leaning towards mathematics since it sounds right.

So, maths it is then. :)

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