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Croke Park next April?


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2 hours ago, Zambini said:

Interesting. Ed's gig in Cork (April 28) is very close to the proposed Croke Park dates (April 23 and 24). And he hasn't announced a Dublin show for his European tour which, although it's not out of the question, it would be a surprise if he skipped Dublin altogether.

So now I'd guess those two Croke Park dates are for Ed and will be added to his tour at some point if the promoters get approval. 

 

Could be the case, but looking at the confirmed dates, several big cities like Berlin are not included in the tour 

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On 9/15/2021 at 11:55 PM, dublinpaul said:

The British Isles is not an officially recognised term in any legal or inter-governmental sense. It is without any official status. The Government, including the Department of Foreign Affairs, does not use this term.

That’s a quote from a former Irish minister for foreign affairs. I never said the poster said Britain , I just thought they meant Britain as I wasn’t familiar with the phrase British isles. 

It's a geographical term and I was using it as such.   It is a convenient phrase describing the islands of Great Britain, Ireland, and all of the many smaller islands around their coastlines.   I think it would be a great shame if this useful term was banned for political reasons.

From the OED:

Quote

 

British Isles, n.

A group of islands, including Britain, Ireland (Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland), the Isle of Man, the Hebrides, the Orkney Islands, the Shetland Islands, the Isles of Scilly, and the Channel Islands, lying off the coast of northwestern Europe, from which they are separated by the North Sea and the English Channel. Chiefly with the.

The term is generally regarded as a geographical or territorial description, rather than as one which designates a political entity. The term is deprecated by some speakers in the Republic of Ireland.

 

I do know where Croke Park is, I have been to gigs there. 

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6 hours ago, MichaelU1230 said:

So at least the Ed Sherran part panned out. Just verifyed that he will play Páirc Uí Chaoimh in Cork on the 28th of April.....Now we're waiting for the Bruce part ;)

Who's Ed Sherran?

Howay man ... he's a good lad and deserves to have his name spelt (spelled?) proper, like.

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3 hours ago, Rizla said:

It's a geographical term and I was using it as such.   It is a convenient phrase describing the islands of Great Britain, Ireland, and all of the many smaller islands around their coastlines.   I think it would be a great shame if this useful term was banned for political reasons.

From the OED:

I do know where Croke Park is, I have been to gigs there. 

Hi Rizla. I can’t understand how anyone can see this as a useful term. It’s as easy to say or type Ireland and Britain than to use it. I’m sure the vast majority of Irish people would have the same view given the historical context. There is no need to lump Britain and Ireland together. 
Enjoy your weekend. 

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2 hours ago, dublinpaul said:

Hi Rizla. I can’t understand how anyone can see this as a useful term. It’s as easy to say or type Ireland and Britain than to use it. I’m sure the vast majority of Irish people would have the same view given the historical context. There is no need to lump Britain and Ireland together. 
Enjoy your weekend. 

As has been shown, it's not just "Ireland and Britain".  It refers to an archipelago of over 6,000 islands and the term has been in use for hundreds of years.  I have zero interest in politics, I've always known it as the British Isles and I shall continue to use it as a geographical term.

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Let's not get caught up in British this and Irish that; there are other places for that crap. There might be a tour coming and I'll be there whether it's here, or there.

I work for a Spanish company and the region is called UK&I. FWIW :D

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Ed Sheeran is promoted in Ireland by Aiken Promotions. Aiken Promotions have applied for the Croke Park April gigs. Ed Sheeran confirmed for other Irish gigs in April. Unthinkable Ed Sheeran would not perform Dublin shows, he is one of, if not the, biggest live act in Ireland in recent years. Ergo, it’s not Bruce in Croke Park next April.

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17 minutes ago, Neil57channels said:

Ed Sheeran is promoted in Ireland by Aiken Promotions. Aiken Promotions have applied for the Croke Park April gigs. Ed Sheeran confirmed for other Irish gigs in April. Unthinkable Ed Sheeran would not perform Dublin shows, he is one of, if not the, biggest live act in Ireland in recent years. Ergo, it’s not Bruce in Croke Park next April.

I agree

 

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4 hours ago, dublinpaul said:

Hi Rizla. I can’t understand how anyone can see this as a useful term. It’s as easy to say or type Ireland and Britain than to use it. I’m sure the vast majority of Irish people would have the same view given the historical context. There is no need to lump Britain and Ireland together. 
Enjoy your weekend. 

The term ‘British Isles’ is used since Roman times, that is well before any Anglo-Saxon set foot on any of these islands. It’s therefore the most ‘Celtic-friendly’ definition of that insular region one can come across. It’s a pure geographical term, and it is used three times a day by every major weather report in mainland Europe. I understand some people may dislike it because of the modern (and incorrect) identification of British as English, but it is basically like Portuguese citizens opposing the use of the term ‘Iberian peninsula’ because Iberian is nowadays a loose synonym of Spanish. (Or a Swiss citizen getting upset when called European, since Switzerland is still no member of the EU). It would be nonsense.

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9 hours ago, Neil57channels said:

Ed Sheeran is promoted in Ireland by Aiken Promotions. Aiken Promotions have applied for the Croke Park April gigs. Ed Sheeran confirmed for other Irish gigs in April. Unthinkable Ed Sheeran would not perform Dublin shows, he is one of, if not the, biggest live act in Ireland in recent years. Ergo, it’s not Bruce in Croke Park next April.

So if the April Croke Park dates are for Ed Sheeran and we believe that Garth Brooks is after securing as many dates there later in the year as licensing and residents will allow, what does that leave there for Bruce? Is there an alternative venue of that size?

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3 hours ago, Old English Town said:

So if the April Croke Park dates are for Ed Sheeran and we believe that Garth Brooks is after securing as many dates there later in the year as licensing and residents will allow, what does that leave there for Bruce? Is there an alternative venue of that size?

I wouldn’t be surprised if it was Slane Castle.

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4 hours ago, Old English Town said:

So if the April Croke Park dates are for Ed Sheeran and we believe that Garth Brooks is after securing as many dates there later in the year as licensing and residents will allow, what does that leave there for Bruce? Is there an alternative venue of that size?

The closest in size in Dublin is the Aviva which is around 45000. I really hope it’s not Slane as it’s a nightmare to get in and out of. 

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14 hours ago, slane85 said:

Let's not get caught up in British this and Irish that; there are other places for that crap. There might be a tour coming and I'll be there whether it's here, or there.

I work for a Spanish company and the region is called UK&I. FWIW :D

We have veered wildly off topic here. Uk and Ireland is bang on as it shows a distinction between the 2.

13 hours ago, Frank said:

The term ‘British Isles’ is used since Roman times, that is well before any Anglo-Saxon set foot on any of these islands. It’s therefore the most ‘Celtic-friendly’ definition of that insular region one can come across. It’s a pure geographical term, and it is used three times a day by every major weather report in mainland Europe. I understand some people may dislike it because of the modern (and incorrect) identification of British as English, but it is basically like Portuguese citizens opposing the use of the term ‘Iberian peninsula’ because Iberian is nowadays a loose synonym of Spanish. (Or a Swiss citizen getting upset when called European, since Switzerland is still no member of the EU). It would be nonsense.

There are plenty of terms and words that were fine to use in the past but are not acceptable now. There is no incorrect identification of British and English from me at all. The Portuguese/Spanish comparison is moot as the 2 countries have a land border and are part of the same peninsula. In regards to the Swiss people, although they are not EU members  they live on a land mass known as Europe. 

15 hours ago, Rizla said:

As has been shown, it's not just "Ireland and Britain".  It refers to an archipelago of over 6,000 islands and the term has been in use for hundreds of years.  I have zero interest in politics, I've always known it as the British Isles and I shall continue to use it as a geographical term.

I think we should agree to disagree as this could go around in circles for a long time. I’m not looking to fall out with anyone or get in to a long drawn out political/historical debate. There has been a huge amount of hurt and loss caused by the British in Ireland (to numerous to mention) and I always find it hard to reconcile when we get thrown in together by people as we are neighbours and mostly share a common language (the reasons for which are a whole different conversation). 
Conversations like this might help someone see a fresh perspective. What some might use as a simple geographic term carries a whole different meaning for someone else. We are all here because of Bruce and what his music means to us and should probably stick to that. Take care. 

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3 hours ago, dublinpaul said:

We have veered wildly off topic here.

Not my doing. 
I had no wish whatsoever to indulge in a political discussion, and have said all I have to say on this.

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In a Mojo article Steve talks of missing acting and looking at scripts. He adds, "..we'll the see what Bruce wants to do next year, virus permitting. We made a wonderful new album (LTY) just before the pandemic, and we'd dearly love to play that thing live".

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5 hours ago, dublinpaul said:

We have veered wildly off topic here. Uk and Ireland is bang on as it shows a distinction between the 2.

There are plenty of terms and words that were fine to use in the past but are not acceptable now. There is no incorrect identification of British and English from me at all. The Portuguese/Spanish comparison is moot as the 2 countries have a land border and are part of the same peninsula. In regards to the Swiss people, although they are not EU members  they live on a land mass known as Europe. 

Well, the comparison with Portugal/Spain will be moot the day Northern Ireland stops existing as a state, I’m afraid. Until that day, it is exactly the same situation in terms of shared land border. But even if it were, as I said, that geographical term is currently used throughout the world. Its origin is far older than the English language or England as such. It dates back from the very times the Iberian peninsula got its name, btw. One day it might well be banned because of new PC concerns, but that would not make this geographical term less accurate or less appropriate today. Hence the comparison with Switzerland: Switzerland is in the same continent as well as Ireland is in the same insular region. No politics involved in both cases: no EU and no UK. The British isles archipelago is called like that on any printed Atlas because in Latin it was identified as ‘Insulas Britannicas’, not because the Romans foresaw that some of them might fall under someone else’s domination some seventeen centuries later. I’m very fond of Ireland and of Irish people (and culture), and I personally would avoid the term when talking to them out of respect. But that doesn’t mean there’s something inaccurate with it or that Irish people have a reason to resent a pure historical geographical definition.

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25 minutes ago, Frank said:

Well, the comparison with Portugal/Spain will be moot the day Northern Ireland stops existing as a state, I’m afraid. Until that day, it is exactly the same situation in terms of shared land border. But even if it were, as I said, that geographical term is currently used throughout the world. Its origin is far older than the English language or England as such. It dates back from the very times the Iberian peninsula got its name, btw. One day it might well be banned because of new PC concerns, but that would not make this geographical term less accurate or less appropriate today. Hence the comparison with Switzerland: Switzerland is in the same continent as well as Ireland is in the same insular region. No politics involved in both cases: no EU and no UK. The British isles archipelago is called like that on any printed Atlas because in Latin it was identified as ‘Insulas Britannicas’, not because the Romans foresaw that some of them might fall under someone else’s domination some seventeen centuries later. I’m very fond of Ireland and of Irish people (and culture), and I personally would avoid the term when talking to them out of respect. But that doesn’t mean there’s something inaccurate with it or that Irish people have a reason to resent a pure historical geographical definition.

Hi Frank. This is going to be my last post on this as I feel the thread has been hijacked. I think it’s slightly unfair to compare a border that was imposed on a country 100 years ago to one which is nearly 1000 years old. 
If people don’t voice concerns about words or phrases that are sensitive nothing will ever change. Just because something has been historically acceptable it doesn’t mean it still is. Even something like a sports team like Washington in the NFL have fallen foul of how the world sees things now. 
Have a good weekend Frank. 

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51 minutes ago, MacBruce said:

Ed Sheerin to play two shows at Hampden Park, Glasgow 17 and 18 June 2022.

Who's this Ed Sheerin fella? ;)

This is Ed SHEERAN. Good, isn't he?

 

 

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