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Sex Pistols tell RRHOF to F-off


mcsorelyslight

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http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20060225/en_nm/...HNlYwN5bmNhdA--

LOS ANGELES (Hollywood Reporter) - The Sex Pistols have opted out on appearing at their induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.
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Tonight, Apolo Anton Ohno has two more chances for Torino Gold.

The groundbreaking English punk rock group officially declined the honor -- to be handed out March 13 at a dinner and performance at the Waldorf Astoria in New York -- in a crudely scrawled, mispunctuated handwritten message posted on the band's Web site Friday.

"Next to the SEX PISTOLS rock and roll and that hall of fame is a piss stain," the statement read. "Your museum. Urine in wine. Were (sic) not coming. Were (sic) not your monkey and so what?"

The statement slammed Hall of Fame voters as "music industry people," and excoriated the high price of attending the exclusive event -- $25,000 for a table, "or $15,000 to squeak up in the gallery."

It concluded, "Your (sic) not paying attention. Outside the sh*t-stem is a real SEX PISTOL."

Other 2006 inductees into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame include Black Sabbath, Blondie, Miles Davis, Lynyrd Skynyrd and industry executives Herb Alpert and Jerry Moss.

Susan Evans, executive director of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Foundation, said of the band's announcement, "They're being the outrageous punksters that they are, and that's rock 'n' roll."

The complete statement is posted at http://www.thefilthandthefury.co.uk.

Reuters/Hollywood Reporter
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QUOTE(mcsorelyslight @ Feb 25 2006, 09:18 AM) [snapback]986620[/snapback]

LOS ANGELES (Hollywood Reporter) - The Sex Pistols have opted out on appearing at their induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.
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Tonight, Apolo Anton Ohno has two more chances for Torino Gold.


Maybe Ohno should have opted out of the Olympics.

At least the Pistols are in good company. McCartney did show for the Beatles' induction, either.

The Hall inducts at least 5 artists a year as performers. Once the Pretenders made it on, all bets are off. Quarterflash will probably make it in around 2027.

They should never have abandoned the Early Influences category. That's where artists like the Pistols, the New York Dolls, Deep Purple, and the Sugarhill Gang belong - those whose influence far outweighed their material and performances.





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QUOTE(cheddarmustard @ Feb 25 2006, 08:29 PM) [snapback]986773[/snapback]

QUOTE(mcsorelyslight @ Feb 25 2006, 09:18 AM) [snapback]986620[/snapback]

LOS ANGELES (Hollywood Reporter) - The Sex Pistols have opted out on appearing at their induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.
ADVERTISEMENT
Tonight, Apolo Anton Ohno has two more chances for Torino Gold.


Maybe Ohno should have opted out of the Olympics.

At least the Pistols are in good company. McCartney did show for the Beatles' induction, either.

The Hall inducts at least 5 artists a year as performers. Once the Pretenders made it on, all bets are off. Quarterflash will probably make it in around 2027.

They should never have abandoned the Early Influences category. That's where artists like the Pistols, the New York Dolls, Deep Purple, and the Sugarhill Gang belong - those whose influence far outweighed their material and performances.



Tell me about it regarding Paulie and the RRHOF. I was friggin' THERE the night he didn't show for Beatles induction. What an ass. But he had no problem showing up the night he went in as a solo artist, though. The Dick.
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QUOTE(JustDan @ Feb 25 2006, 04:14 PM) [snapback]986665[/snapback]

Aren't they all dead anyway?.... except for loudmouth obnoxious Lydon?...

Er, no. All original members still alive.

The fraud member Sid did die but the original fab four of John, Paul, Steve and Glen are all alive and kicking.
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QUOTE(Miami MArk @ Feb 25 2006, 08:35 AM) [snapback]986623[/snapback]

Good for them. The whole thing is a joke anyway. One big circle jerk.


The world must be coming to an end, because i agree 100% with mark....

I would expect no less from the pistols. But it sure would be entertaining to hear Lydon speak at the induction ceremony..
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That is fu**ing great!!!! The Sex Pistols are too rock n roll for The Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame. And don't be slacking the Pretenders Pal, but your Quaterflash reference gave me a chuckel. wink.gif biggrin.gif
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Lydon isn't too rock 'n roll for anything....He's a 50 something teenager with a loud mouth & an obnoxious personality. Grow the f**k up, doofus
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QUOTE(JustDan @ Feb 27 2006, 01:27 PM) [snapback]987817[/snapback]

Lydon isn't too rock 'n roll for anything....He's a 50 something teenager with a loud mouth & an obnoxious personality. Grow the f**k up, doofus

I agree with JustDan.
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Sex Pistols? Pah! Supposedly the one time saviours of British Rock they were a crock of old shite. They had one decent song - 'Submission'. The rest of their stuff pales in comparison to the New York Scene which supposedly inspired them - give me the New York Dolls instead any day.

Are the Clash up for induction, too? They were as bad the Pistols - a joke band as well as being unintentionally and extraordinarily camp in a 'Ooh, don't I look cute in Khaki and boots' kind of way.

What amazes me is the number of Yanks especially who think the Clash were some kind of authentic voice of British working class urban youth. Bollocks. Strummer was the middle class son of a Diplomat. Their assumed affinity with Britain's Afro-Caribbean community was as hilarious as it was patronising. They were about as representative of the British Working Class as the Dukes of Hazzard. Their lyrics are hilarious to the point of verging on self parody and satire - e.g Clampdown, Guns of Brixton.

FACT - Back in 1977 your British working class was more likely to be into Saturday Night Fever or Ritchie Blackmore's Rainbow than into Punk - the most overhyped 'musical' event ever.






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QUOTE(JustDan @ Mar 2 2006, 08:05 PM) [snapback]990003[/snapback]

So, in your expert opinion, was Whitesnake better than the Clash?


I have opinions but I wouldn't assume I was 'expert' at anything. A couple of weeks back I enjoyed getting a bit drunk watching a Whitesnake DVD. And why not? Sometimes a bit of unpretentious blues rock is all it takes.

There's no point in comparing the Clash with a heavy rock band; they inhabited what seemed at the time -and with hindsight still does - an alternative universe.

My argument with the Clash is that they set out to project an image that was laughably false whilst making a barely articulate 'political' message that doesn't really stack up. Example: In 'Clampdown' they make references to people being given their 'due' for 'Working for the Clampdown'. In the contex of 1979 this could only have been a direct reference to the the success of the Iranian Revolution - led by those awfully nice islamic militant chappies who'd have no sooner looked at a Punk Rocker than they'd have him beheaded in front of the nearest camera. I'm not saying the Clash supported tyranny, I'm just saying they never had a fucking clue what they were talking about. Probably due to the amount coke they were stuffing up their rebellious little noses. However, stick a naive psuedo political rant over decent riff and the punters just lap it up without thinking it through. It makes them feel rightous just by throwing their fists into the air and singing along. And it's much easier than reading a book or a newspaper.

So in sum, Whitenake set out to be a blues rock band and were a blues rock band. The Clash set out deliver a 'message' and made complete dicks out of themselves - and their fans, who were basically being taken for ride. I guess I'd have to say that in terms of achieving their overall relative personal aims as artists that Whitesnake were, indeed, better than the Clash.
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QUOTE(BillCheatham @ Mar 2 2006, 12:54 PM) [snapback]990046[/snapback]

QUOTE(Miami MArk @ Feb 25 2006, 01:35 PM) [snapback]986623[/snapback]

Good for them. The whole thing is a joke anyway. One big circle jerk.



Couldn't agree more.


Yer. It's the pistols wtf do you expect?
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QUOTE(JohnF @ Mar 2 2006, 06:51 PM) [snapback]989942[/snapback]

FACT - Back in 1977 your British working class was more likely to be into Saturday Night Fever or Ritchie Blackmore's Rainbow than into Punk - the most overhyped 'musical' event ever.

Of course metal and disco were more popular than punk. Does not make them better. I reckon the Pistols and the Clash have worn better than Richie Blackmore's Rainbow. smile.gif And I saw a fair few punk gigs in 1977 and I can assure you that the middle classes were in scant attendance, but they were very friendly places to be in the main and all were welcome. I think you under-estimate the NME coverage in 1976/7 in particular by working class journalists like Tony Parsons and Julie Burchill. Of course there were frauds, The Police were never punk for instance but dressed up like them (a bit). To be fair, Parsons in his Bruce feature in 78 did say that Factory was a more working class song than most punk bands would recognise. But the likes of John Lydon were not pretending to be poor, they were. The likes of Weller was probably not poor but it did not matter, that was not the crucial thing.

For the record, as far as I am aware Lydon is now a property millionaire who thinks that anyone who made a few quid back then and did not buy property is an idiot. He may be right.
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QUOTE(NorthSideJimmy @ Mar 6 2006, 06:36 PM) [snapback]992615[/snapback]

QUOTE(JohnF @ Mar 2 2006, 06:51 PM) [snapback]989942[/snapback]

FACT - Back in 1977 your British working class was more likely to be into Saturday Night Fever or Ritchie Blackmore's Rainbow than into Punk - the most overhyped 'musical' event ever.

Of course metal and disco were more popular than punk. Does not make them better. I reckon the Pistols and the Clash have worn better than Richie Blackmore's Rainbow. smile.gif And I saw a fair few punk gigs in 1977 and I can assure you that the middle classes were in scant attendance, but they were very friendly places to be in the main and all were welcome. I think you under-estimate the NME coverage in 1976/7 in particular by working class journalists like Tony Parsons and Julie Burchill. Of course there were frauds, The Police were never punk for instance but dressed up like them (a bit). To be fair, Parsons in his Bruce feature in 78 did say that Factory was a more working class song than most punk bands would recognise. But the likes of John Lydon were not pretending to be poor, they were. The likes of Weller was probably not poor but it did not matter, that was not the crucial thing.

For the record, as far as I am aware Lydon is now a property millionaire who thinks that anyone who made a few quid back then and did not buy property is an idiot. He may be right.


I didn't like Ritchie Blackmore's Rainbow either. Or disco for that matter. I'm old enough myself to remember the NME coverage and I do think punk was seriouly overhyped (quite successfully) by a trendy London media desperate to be the first to discover this week's big new thing. So successfully, that bands who were by no stretch of the imagination playing 'punk rock' copied punk fashion just to get themselves noticed - the Police, as you note, being the best example. However, even by 1978, a punk rocker was a rare sight in provincial Britain including major cities such as Liverpool (where I lived at the time).

In 1978 Tony Parsons and Julie Burchill wrote a book called 'The Boy Looked at Johnny' which in effect described Punk as a spent force dominated by charlatans, including the Clash.

Paul Weller was easily the best songwriter of his generation but The Jam were no punk rock band and, I believe, would have existed even if Johnny Rotten had never swore on prime time TV.
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I read the boy looked at Johnny years ago. Burchill is from Bristol so is hardly part of a London mafia. They did love the Clash's first LP. Can't remember which of the two said to the accusation that you could not understand the words that the people who were supposed to understand could understand fine.

I used to go to Liverpool for Easter most of those years and saw some great gigs at Erics. It would be true that "punks" were not too visible after 1978 but it was never really about having green spiky hair, it was as much or more about attitude to the music, which did not go away with the hairstyle. As soon as it became fashionable to look punky punks stopped looking too punky. But for me it was not about hair or dress (within reason, I mean you would not want flairs or wide trousers smile.gif ). Look at some of the pics of Shane McGowan at early punk gigs, he was in a button-up woolly cardigan, how less punk can you dress? But he was unmistakebly punk.
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QUOTE(NorthSideJimmy @ Mar 6 2006, 09:26 PM) [snapback]992765[/snapback]

I read the boy looked at Johnny years ago. Burchill is from Bristol so is hardly part of a London mafia. They did love the Clash's first LP.


You don't have to be born a Londoner to become part of of the London media mafia. Burchill moved to London aged 16 to work for the NME following a successful response to an advertisement for a 'hip young gunslinger'. She subsequently pursued a highly paid journalistic career which continues to this day. Her employment by the NME was a cynical move intended to prove that it was in touch with 'the kids'. She's earned a fair amount writing for Murdoch owned newspapers and is responsible for writing some of the worst and misguided (if often entertaining) journalism ever written.

She later admitted to secretly detesting punk; that she'd publicly pay lip service to the Pistols, Clash etc but really preferred listening to the Isley Brothers.

Her best journalism was not the stuff she wrote in support of punk but a series of classic put downs of major rock acts via the NME album reviews section. Her review slating 'The River' as music for people who wasted their youths to listen to whilst crying into their beer still makes me chuckle, though with hindsight she was probably using it as a means of getting at her then estranged husband, Tony Parsons, a self confessed 'Bruce Bore'.

Punk was also championed by established 'hippie' journalists such as Charles Shaar Murray, Nick Kent and Mick Farren. Same journalists who got a lot of pleasure slagging off Born to Run and the '75 Hammersmith performances and contributed probably to the recently debunked myth the those shows were crap.

Burchill's most recent contribution to life, the universe and everything is a TV documentary praising HEAT magazine as the true voice of the people. Sadly, she might just be right.



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I never liked 'em that much,but I think they did the right thing..
If they would've done it,now THAT would've bothered me..
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